Slavery and the Making of the University University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Manuscripts Department Slavery and the Making of the University

[Source Description: 1 September 1847. David L. Swain to William A. Graham. University of North Carolina Papers (#40005), University Archives, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.]


Chapel Hill, 1 Sep. 1847.

My dear Sir,

I am glad to learn through Mr.Washington that you design to visit us on Saturday, and will be still more gratified if you should find it convenient to pass the day here, and at my house.

Several subjects require consideration. Gov. Morehead and yourself came to the conclusion, I believe, that a Cabinet maker rather than a carpenter ought to be employed to put up the shelves in the new libraries. Thompson of Raleigh would probably be glad to get the job. He is ordinarily so extravagant in his charges, however, that I do not like to employ him. It has recently occurred to me, that Evans (the freeman of colour) of your town, might answer our purposes. I



know nothing of him personally and will be greatly obliged to you, if you consider him a suitable person to secure him down here. In addition to this job, if he is competent to the task, the Societies will probably employ him to render the furniture for their Libraries and [?].

The best mode of arranging the shelves in the Libraries, is a matter of interest. Mr. Davis and Mr. Donaldson, have furnished plans, and Mr. Pettigrew, now of the National Observatory, who is familiar with their plans, the capacity of the Halls and the views of the young men, has examined the Library room at Washington, and submitted his views in a letter which I enclose.

What is to be done with the Stewards Hall? - Is there to be a successor to Prof. Deems[?], and if so who is he to be? - In what manner shall we attempt to improve the college grounds? - I have a good deal to say on each of these heads, at the earliest opportunity.



Two or three persons here are anxious to purchase lots, viz. R. H. Lee, Caudle and P. Clemmons.

We have never had since my connection with this institution, such general diligence and propriety of deportment, as promises to characterize the present session.

I am very respectfully,

Your ob[edien]t servant

D. L. Swain

His Excellency,
Governor Graham.



Gov. Swain On Sundry Subjects

His Excellency, Governor Graham, Hillsborough, N.C.