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Collection Number: 00011

Collection Title: Alexander and Hillhouse Family Papers, 1758-1976

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the FAQ section for more information.


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Size 3.5 feet of linear shelf space (approximately 2000 items)
Abstract Adam Alexander (1758-1812), a Scottish physician, emigrated to Liberty County, Ga., in 1776, where he acquired land and married Louisa Frederika Schmidt (1777-1846). The Alexanders' son, Adam Leopold (1803-1882), graduated from Yale and became a successful planter in Washington (Wilkes County), Ga. David Hillhouse (1756-1804) of Connecticut married Sarah Porter of Massachusetts and settled in Georgia in 1787. His son, David P. Hillhouse (1790-1851), had property and business interests in New England, South Carolina, and Georgia. His daughter, Sarah Hillhouse (1782-1808) married Felix H. Gilbert in 1804. Gilbert was a member of the Georgia legislature, 1807-1808. In 1823 Adam Leopold Alexander married Sarah Hillhouse Gilbert. Together they had ten children, among them Louisa (Alexander) Gilmer (1824-1895); Edward Porter Alexander (1835-1910); Sarah (Alexander) Lawton (1826-1897); and Harriet (Alexander) Cumming (b. 1828). Adam's sister, Louisa, married Anthony Porter of Savannah. Adam Leopold Alexander (1867-1911) married Nellie Holman Baldwin (1869-1954). Their son, Adam Leopold Alexander (1902-1960), married Elizabeth Baldwin (b. 1913) in 1939. The papers consist of extensive family and personal correspondence, business correspondence, plantation accounts, physician's accounts, estate papers, travel journals, and genealogical materials. They document family, political, and religious life in Washington and Savannah, Ga., and in Connecticut and New York.
Creator Alexander family



Hillhouse family
Language English
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Restrictions to Access
No restrictions. Open for research.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the Alexander and Hillhouse Family Papers #11, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Alternate Form of Material
All or part of this collection is available on microfilm from University Publications of America as part of the Records of ante-bellum southern plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War, Series J.
Acquisitions Information
Before 1940 these papers came to the Southern Historical Collection from Mrs. Irvine Alexander, Marion Boggs, Bessie Craig, Sarah A. Cunningham, Mrs. Stanley Erickson, Mrs. John R. Ficklen, Mrs. A. J. Kilpatrick, Jr., Mrs. J. F. Minis, and Mrs. Isaac Read. Additions came from Mrs. James P. Houston in 1940, Mrs. J. F. Minis in 1941, Sarah A. Cunningham in 1948, Mr. Alexander R. Lawton in 1950 and 1952, and Elizabeth A. Ford in August 2002 (Acc. 99301)
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Biographical Information

Dr. Adam Alexander (1758-1812), a Scottish physician, emigrated to Liberty County, Ga., in 1776, where he bought land and in 1802 married Louisa Frederika Schmidt (1777-1846). Frederika was the daughter of Egydius Heinrich Schmidt, German immigrant and cotton merchant at Savannah. Adam and Frederika's son, Adam Leopold Alexander (1803-1882), graduated from Yale and became a successful planter in Washington, Wilkes County, Ga.

David Hillhouse (1756-1804) was born in Connecticut. He married Sarah Porter of Massachusetts and settled in Georgia in 1787. After Hillhouse's death in 1804, Sarah remained in Washington, Ga., where she raised their three children. Their son, David P. Hillhouse (1790-1851), acquired property and business interests in New England, South Carolina, and Georgia, and lived at various times in each of these places. His daughter, Sarah Hillhouse, married Felix H. Gilbert, a planter and member of the Georgia legislature in 1807 and 1808.

In 1823, Adam Alexander's son, Adam Leopold Alexander, married Sarah Gilbert, the daughter of Felix H. Gilbert and Sarah Hillhouse Gilbert. Sarah was educated in New Haven, Conn., by her grandmother, Sarah Porter Hillhouse, between 1817 and 1820. Adam L. and Sarah had ten children, among whom were Edward Porter, Sarah, Harriet, and Louisa Alexander. Edward Porter Alexander became a cadet at West Point in 1853 and served as a Confederate brigadier general in the Civil War. Sarah married Alexander Robert Lawton in 1845, and Harriet married Wallace Cumming in 1853. Another daughter, Louisa (later Mrs. Jeremy Francis Gilmer), was raised by Adam L. Alexander's sister, Louisa, and her husband Anthony Porter. Porter was a Savannah planter and businessman, who in his youth served as secretary to Georgia governor David Brydie Mitchell. The Porter household also included Mrs. Louisa Schmidt Alexander until her death in 1846, and Mrs. Dorothea Schmidt VanYeveren.

Other children of Adam Leopold and Sarah Gilbert Alexander were Mary Clifford, who married George G. Hull in 1882; William Felix; Charles Atwood; James Hillhouse; Marion Brackett, who married William Ellison Boggs in 1870; and Alice VanYeveren, who married Alexander Cheves Haskell in 1870.

Ten years after his first wife's death, Adam Leopold Alexander married Jane Marian Dunwody Glenn (1821-1885).

Adam Leopold Alexander (1867-1911) married Nellie Holman Baldwin (1869-1954) on 15 January 1902. Their son, Adam Leopold (Leap) Alexander married Elizabeth (Boots) Baldwin in 1939.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Scope and Content

Comprising mostly personal correspondence, this collection also contains plantation and business papers of Dr. Adam Alexander, Adam Leopold Alexander (1803-1882), Anthony Porter, David P. Hillhouse, William Gilbert (brother of Felix H. Gilbert), and Adam Leopold Alexander (b. 1903?). Personal correspondence illuminates the religious, family, and political life of Washington and Savannah, Georgia, and of various locations in New England.

The Alexander correspondence (Series 1) focuses mostly on family and religion, though some information appears on business dealings. Sarah Alexander's correspondence illuminates the relationship between Northern and Southern women, documenting the lives of friends and family in Georgia, Connecticut, and New York. Educated in New Haven, she maintained ties with friends and relatives who remained there, many of whom participated actively in New Haven's religious life. The correspondence of Adam Leopold Alexander (1803-1882) gives only limited information on his financial affairs, but provides interesting insights into his relationship with his slaves and with free blacks. Evidence appears that Alexander gave legal and economic aid to at least two free black men, and that he maintained closer than usual ties with former slaves.

The financial and legal papers of the Alexander family (Series 2) provide information chiefly concerning the estate of Adam Alexander, including financial accounts and land acquisitions. Papers for Adam Leopold Alexander's plantations consist primarily of legal agreements with other planters. A significant amount of material appears for Anthony Porter, but documents mostly his personal finances.

Other Papers (Series 3) provide interesting information on how late eighteenth century immigrants to America brought with them their own ways of life, including cooking habits and medicinal remedies. It also provides insights into antebellum family life and travel.

Hillhouse personal correspondence (Series 4) belongs mostly to David P. Hillhouse, though significant correspondence also appears for Felix H. Gilbert, Sarah Gilbert Alexander before her marriage, and other Hillhouse family members. The correspondence is most useful for the study of Georgia politics and family life. Business affairs are discussed, but little detail is available. The correspondence of Margaret P. Hillhouse provides a large amount of information on the genealogy of the Hillhouse, Porter, Baldwin, and other New England and Georgia families.

The financial and legal papers of David P. Hillhouse (and others) contained in Series 5 provide some details of his plantation's value and income, but shed little light on his other business ventures. These papers offer most information on Sarah (Gilbert) Alexander's inheritance.

Series 6 provides mostly genealogical information, though David P. Hillhouse's travel journals offer interesting descriptions of politics, New England industries, towns in New York state, and various educational and social welfare institutions.

Pictures of individuals in both the Alexander and Hillhouse families appear in Series 7. Most of the individuals and scenes are identified, and photographs, though mostly undated, are in good condition. One museum item, a lead pencil (circa 1835), ends the collection as Series 8.

The addition of August 2002 (see Subcollection 1 Series 1.5 and folder 87) contains correspondence, 1938-1952, of Elizabeth (Boots) Baldwin and Adam Leopold (Leap) Alexander of Savannah, Ga.; a letter, 28 April 1932, from Adam Leopold (Leap) Alexander to his sister, Eleanor Whitaker, describing the 50th wedding anniversary dinner of Alexander R. Lawton (1858-1936) and Ella (Daisy) Beckwith Lawton (1860-1949); the marriage license, 1902, of Nellie Holman Baldwin and Adam Leopold Alexander (1867-1911); an invitation, 1902, to the wedding of Nellie Holman Baldwin and Adam Leopold Alexander (1867-1911); an obituary of Adam Leopold Alexander (1867-1911); and the marriage license, 1939, of Elizabeth Baldwin and Adam Leopold Alexander.

Note that correspondence of Louisa Alexander Gilmer, Edward Porter Alexander, and Sarah Alexander Lawton that is dated after their marriages or after their leaving home appears in other collections in the Southern Historical Collection.

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Contents list

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series Quick Links

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subcollection 1. Alexander Family Papers, 1758-1915.

About 1600 items.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 1. Alexander Family: Correspondence, 1798-1882.

About 1400 items.

Mostly personal correspondence, with some business letters, of the Alexander family. Most of the correspondence belongs to Adam Leopold Alexander and his wife, Sarah Gilbert Alexander. Other significant correspondents are their children, Louisa, Harriet, Sarah, and Edward P.; Adam L. Alexander's mother, Louisa Schmidt Alexander; his sister, Louisa, and her husband, Anthony Porter; and the Alexanders' in-laws and several of their grandchildren.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.1. 1798-1851.

About 600 items.

Only one eighteenth-century item, a 24 September 1798 letter (an apparent handwritten copy) from Benjamin Rush to M. VanYeveren of Albany, appears, and concerns the death of Henry L. Schmidt. Two letters, 1810 and 1811, appear from Anthony Porter to Governor David Brydie Mitchell (1776-1837), written while Porter was serving as the governor's secretary. No letters appear from 1811 to 1818. Between 1819 and 1823 several letters appear addressed to Alexander family members, including Adam Leopold Alexander. Also included are letters, 24 December 1821 and 12 January 1822, from Adam Leopold Alexander to Sarah Gilbert before their marriage

From 1823 to 1851 much of the correspondence consists of letters written to Sarah Gilbert Alexander in Washington, Ga., by friends and family. Frequent correspondents are her cousin Mary L. Hillhouse in New Haven, Conn., and her friends Harriet Staples Douglass Smith (New Haven and later New York) and Bell Taylor in New Haven. Letters discuss the social and religious life of the Alexanders and their Northern connections. Of note are a letter, 26 September 1836, from Bell Taylor soliciting funds for the Durand Society and a letter, 1 April 1834, from Harriet discussing the role of emancipation in splits among Presbyterians in New Haven.

Adam Leopold Alexander's most frequent correspondent was his wife, Sarah, though he also exchanged letters with a number of other friends and relatives. Many of the earlier letters between Adam and Sarah, especially circa 1825-1832, discuss family news, personal feelings, plantation and other financial affairs, and Adam's travels. Their later letters focus on religion and education. Of note is a letter, 13 August 1835, Adam wrote Sarah about the establishment of a Methodist academy in Washington, Ga. Topics of interest in Adam Alexander's other correspondence include life at Yale and Dartmouth in the 1820s, free blacks, Georgia politics, and education. Of interest are several 1843 letters from Robert Toombs discussing Georgia elections; a letter, 30 April 1839, from a former slave requesting that Alexander buy her back; a letter, 13 September 1848, from W. Baud discussing the establishment of a school for women in Savannah; and a letter, 4 August 1849, from William Bostwick concerning a free black man Alexander had asked Bostwick to give employment.

Both Adam and Sarah Alexander maintained correspondence with their children and a number of relatives throughout the 1830s and 1840s. Letters to and from Sarah and Louisa at boarding school in Savannah chiefly discuss school life. Letters from Adam's sister, Louisa Porter, and to and from other relatives chiefly discuss mostly family matters.

Other correspondence of note is that of Anthony Porter and Dorothea VanYeveren. Most of Porter's correspondence appears after 1827 and is business related. Dorothea VanYeveren received scattered letters from relatives in Germany (letters are in German).

Folder 1

1798, 1810, 1811, 1819-1823 #00011, Subseries: "1.1. 1798-1851." Folder 1

Folder 2

1824-1826 #00011, Subseries: "1.1. 1798-1851." Folder 2

Folder 3

1827-1831 #00011, Subseries: "1.1. 1798-1851." Folder 3

Folder 4

1832-1833 #00011, Subseries: "1.1. 1798-1851." Folder 4

Folder 5

1834-1835 #00011, Subseries: "1.1. 1798-1851." Folder 5

Folder 6

1836 #00011, Subseries: "1.1. 1798-1851." Folder 6

Folder 7

1837-1838 #00011, Subseries: "1.1. 1798-1851." Folder 7

Folder 8

1839-1841 #00011, Subseries: "1.1. 1798-1851." Folder 8

Folder 9

1842-1843 #00011, Subseries: "1.1. 1798-1851." Folder 9

Folder 10

1844-1846 #00011, Subseries: "1.1. 1798-1851." Folder 10

Folder 11

1847-1849 #00011, Subseries: "1.1. 1798-1851." Folder 11

Folder 12

1850-1851 #00011, Subseries: "1.1. 1798-1851." Folder 12

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.2. Undated (circa 1798-1851).

About 100 items.

Mostly letters received by Louisa Alexander before her marriage in 1850. Many letters are from her mother, Sarah Gilbert Alexander and concern family. Louisa also received several letters from friends. Other correspondence belongs to Adam L. Alexander, Dorothea VanYeveren, and Louisa Alexander Porter. Of note is a letter from "Sally" offering funds to an abolitionist; a letter from the Alexander's nurse Cynthia (a slave?) to Louisa Alexander; a recommendation written by Adam L. Alexander for Mary Moseley; and a letter to "Miss B." from the Trustees of Washington Female Seminary listing the resolutions of the Board.

Folder 13-14

Folder 13

Folder 14

Undated (circa 1798-1851) #00011, Subseries: "1.2. Undated (circa 1798-1851)." Folder 13-14

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.3. 1852-1870.

About 650 items.

Mostly correspondence of the Alexanders with their children and new in laws, together with a significant number of letters their children exchanged with friends and relatives. A large number of ardent love letters exchanged between Harriet Alexander and Wallace Cumming appear for 1852. Of note are letters from Edward P. Alexander while he attended West Point, 1859-1860, discussing school life and plans, and letters from him during the Civil War. The Civil War letters are written from Richmond in 1861; from the headquarters of the Army of the Potomac, Richmond, and near Rapidan Station in 1862; from near Fredricksburg, Caroline County, near Culpeper, near Bunker's Hills, and near Chattanooga in 1863; and Petersburg in 1864. These letters often discuss troops and strategies. Letters, circa 1852- 1860, to Anthony Porter and Adam L. Alexander from Jeremy F. Gilmer concern projects Gilmer was involved with in the Army Corps of Engineers. There are also letters from Gilmer in Richmond during the Civil War. Letters exchanged among other family members frequently discuss religion and slavery, secession, wartime preparations and hardships, and family news.

Only one letter appears between 1871 and 1875. This is a letter, 2 November 1874, written by Lula (Lucy Roy) Alexander, age 11, to her first cousin, Nora Lawton.

Folder 15

April-August 1852 #00011, Subseries: "1.3. 1852-1870." Folder 15

Folder 16

September-December 1852 #00011, Subseries: "1.3. 1852-1870." Folder 16

Folder 17

1853-1854 #00011, Subseries: "1.3. 1852-1870." Folder 17

Folder 18

1855-1857 #00011, Subseries: "1.3. 1852-1870." Folder 18

Folder 19

1859-1860 #00011, Subseries: "1.3. 1852-1870." Folder 19

Folder 20

1861 #00011, Subseries: "1.3. 1852-1870." Folder 20

Folder 21

1862 #00011, Subseries: "1.3. 1852-1870." Folder 21

Folder 22

1863-1864 #00011, Subseries: "1.3. 1852-1870." Folder 22

Folder 23

1865-1870, 1874 #00011, Subseries: "1.3. 1852-1870." Folder 23

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.4. 1876-1915.

27 items.

Mostly letters received by the Alexander children and Mrs. Anthony Porter of Savannah. Included are a few letters to the family of Mary Clifford Alexander Hull. Topics of interest are estate matters, family news, and World War I medical care. Two letters, 3 January and 16 January 1915, from Elizabeth Nourse, an American nurse serving in France, to her friend Lucy Baldwin, provide information on hospital conditions and wartime refugees.

Folder 24

1876-1915 #00011, Subseries: "1.4. 1876-1915." Folder 24

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.5. 1932-1952 (Addition of August 2002 (Acc. 99301)).

20 items.

Correspondence, 1938-1952, of Elizabeth (Boots) Baldwin (1913-1998) and Adam Leopold (Leap) Alexander (1902-1960) of Savannah, Ga., and a letter, 28 April 1932, from Adam Leopold (Leap) Alexander to his sister, Eleanor Whitaker, describing the 50th wedding anniversary dinner of Alexander R. Lawton (1858-1936) and Ella (Daisy) Beckwith Lawton (1860-1949). The first few letters from Leap Alexander to Boots Baldwin were written in 1938, before they were married. Most later letters were written when Boots Alexander was visiting her parents or other family members. The letters chiefly contain expressions of affection, and also give news of family and friends and some description of travel. Beginning in the 1940s, letters often contain news of the couple's daughter, Elizabeth Baldwin Alexander (born 29 December 1941), who was called Betty or Punkie. Another daughter, Eloise Porter Alexander, was born on 10 November 1944.

Folder 84

1932-1939 #00011, Subseries: "1.5. 1932-1952 (Addition of August 2002 (Acc. 99301))." Folder 84

Folder 85

1940-1943 #00011, Subseries: "1.5. 1932-1952 (Addition of August 2002 (Acc. 99301))." Folder 85

Folder 86

1944-1952 #00011, Subseries: "1.5. 1932-1952 (Addition of August 2002 (Acc. 99301))." Folder 86

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 2. Alexander Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1758-1888 and undated.

About 160 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Mostly plantation papers of Dr. Adam Alexander and his heirs, with scattered plantation and business papers of Anthony Porter. Papers between 1758 and 1818 consist mostly of deeds and other papers relating to lands at Sunbury (Liberty Co.), Ga., acquired by Dr. Adam Alexander and inherited by his widow, Louisa Schmidt Alexander. Persons involved in the various property transfers were John and William Peacock, Thomas Chalmers, Joseph Jones, Jesse McCall, John Lawson, and others. Other items include receipts, indentures, wills, and various legal documents relating to the division of the estate. Dr. Alexander's physician's accounts for 1804 to 1806, contained in an 89-page daybook, are also included.

Material from 1820 to 1882 pertains to Adam Alexander's estate and to the plantation and business interests of Adam Leopold Alexander and Anthony Porter. One 168-page volume, 1824 1858, lists accounts for Adam Alexander's estate, divided among his widow Louisa, his son, Adam Leopold, his son-in-law, Anthony Porter, and his daughter, Dorothea VanYeveren. A number of agreements entered into by Adam Leopold Alexander appear concerning the hiring of slaves and use of lands. A memorandum book for 1851 to 1864 lists clothing and cloth given out to slaves on one plantation at Washington, Ga. Lists of winter clothes and shoes given out to slaves on Adam L. Alexander's Hopewell Plantation in 1860 also appear.

Of particular interest are two items related to Alexander Brown, a free black man. A document, 2 October 1843, appears appointing Adam Leopold Alexander as Brown's guardian for legal purposes. A 24 August 1843 receipt appears for Brown's corporation tax in Washington, Ga.

Anthony Porter's plantation and business papers are scattered across the years 1820 to 1868. They include bonds, bank notes, indentures, tax receipts, deeds, and slave bills of sale.

Miscellaneous papers after 1868 include Adam Leopold Alexander's and Louisa Alexander Porter's wills and an 1879 affidavit for a land grant given David Hillhouse in 1778. Undated material includes an article of agreement between Adam L. Alexander and Dr. Robertson; a schedule of lands belonging to the estate of John Hardy; a plat of land bought by Thomas Peacock from William Peacock; and a receipt belonging to John Lawson.

Folder 25

1758-1806 #00011, Series: "2. Alexander Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1758-1888 and undated." Folder 25

Folder 26

1804-1806 #00011, Series: "2. Alexander Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1758-1888 and undated." Folder 26

Physician's Accounts of Adam Alexander

Folder 27

1807-1811 #00011, Series: "2. Alexander Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1758-1888 and undated." Folder 27

Folder 28

1812-1818 #00011, Series: "2. Alexander Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1758-1888 and undated." Folder 28

Folder 29

1820-1827 #00011, Series: "2. Alexander Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1758-1888 and undated." Folder 29

Folder 30

1828-1849 #00011, Series: "2. Alexander Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1758-1888 and undated." Folder 30

Folder 31

1824-1858 #00011, Series: "2. Alexander Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1758-1888 and undated." Folder 31

Memorandum Book for Estate of Adam Alexander

Folder 32

1850-1858 #00011, Series: "2. Alexander Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1758-1888 and undated." Folder 32

Folder 33

1851-1864 #00011, Series: "2. Alexander Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1758-1888 and undated." Folder 33

Plantation Book

Folder 34

1859-1864 #00011, Series: "2. Alexander Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1758-1888 and undated." Folder 34

Folder 35

1865-1888 #00011, Series: "2. Alexander Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1758-1888 and undated." Folder 35

Folder 36

Undated #00011, Series: "2. Alexander Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1758-1888 and undated." Folder 36

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 3. Alexander Family: Other Papers, 1763-1910 and undated.

32 items.

Genealogical material and miscellaneous items related to family and politics.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.1. Genealogical Material, 1803, 1847, 1869, 1882, 1899, 1910, and undated.

17 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Clippings, notes, and other material related to the Alexander family. Of note is a memorandum of the baptism of Adam Leopold Alexander, dated 30 July 1803 (actual baptism 29 July), made by his father.

Folder 37

Genealogical material #00011, Subseries: "3.1. Genealogical Material, 1803, 1847, 1869, 1882, 1899, 1910, and undated." Folder 37

Folder 87

Genealogical Materials (Addition of August 2002 (Acc. 99301)) #00011, Subseries: "3.1. Genealogical Material, 1803, 1847, 1869, 1882, 1899, 1910, and undated." Folder 87

Marriage license, 1902, of Nellie Holman Baldwin and Adam Leopold Alexander (1867-1911); invitation, 1902, to the wedding of Nellie Holman Baldwin and Adam Leopold Alexander (1867-1911); obituary of Adam Leopold Alexander (1867-1911); and marriage license, 1939, of Elizabeth Baldwin and Adam Leopold Alexander.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.2. Clippings, 1859, 1865?, and undated.

5 items.

Arrangement: Chronological.

Clippings concerning politics and Confederate currency. Three clippings are 1859 letters to the editor of the New York Evening Express by "A.B.C." (probably Jeremy F. Gilmer) defending the United States Army Corps of Engineers from attacks levied by the paper and others. One clipping (probably 1865) lists the value of Confederate money. A final clipping appears only as a fragment and contains several advertisements.

Folder 38

Clippings #00011, Subseries: "3.2. Clippings, 1859, 1865?, and undated." Folder 38

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.3. Miscellaneous Items, 1763, 1770, 1801, 1833, 1842, 1888, and undated.

11 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Personal writings, recipes, and other miscellaneous items collected by members of the Alexander family. Included are childhood and later compositions and poems by Sarah R. Alexander and Sarah (Gilbert) Alexander. Of interest is a brief dramatic sketch (undated, author unknown) describing a scene around the Adam Leopold Alexander dinner table.

Volumes include two undated recipe books. The first contains recipes in German (pp. 1-79) and in English (pp. 80-100 and unnumbered) for cooking and curing diseases. The second is a 90-page, pocket-sized volume containing recipes for cooking and medicines. An 1801 travel journal of Dr. Adam Alexander appears, and describes a trip he took with William Peacock to the North, including various stops in New York, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Washington City, Virginia, and North and South Carolina.

Several loose pages also appear from a German sketch and notebook (1759-1763), belonging to Egydius Heinrich Schmidt, which includes verses in German and several watercolors. Translations of three items from the volume are filed with it.

Folder 39

Pages from German sketch/notebook of Egydius Schmidt, 1759-1763 #00011, Subseries: "3.3. Miscellaneous Items, 1763, 1770, 1801, 1833, 1842, 1888, and undated." Folder 39

Folder 40

Travel journal of Adam Alexander, 1801 #00011, Subseries: "3.3. Miscellaneous Items, 1763, 1770, 1801, 1833, 1842, 1888, and undated." Folder 40

Folder 41

Other papers, 1833, 1842 #00011, Subseries: "3.3. Miscellaneous Items, 1763, 1770, 1801, 1833, 1842, 1888, and undated." Folder 41

Folder 42

Other papers, 1888 and undated #00011, Subseries: "3.3. Miscellaneous Items, 1763, 1770, 1801, 1833, 1842, 1888, and undated." Folder 42

Folder 43

Recipe book (in German and English), undated #00011, Subseries: "3.3. Miscellaneous Items, 1763, 1770, 1801, 1833, 1842, 1888, and undated." Folder 43

Folder 44

Recipe book, undated #00011, Subseries: "3.3. Miscellaneous Items, 1763, 1770, 1801, 1833, 1842, 1888, and undated." Folder 44

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subcollection 2. Hillhouse Family Papers, 1759-1976

About 450 items.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 4. Hillhouse Family: Correspondence, 1775-1849; 1874-1923.

About 300 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Family and business correspondence of the Hillhouse family of New England and Georgia.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 4.1. 1775-1849.

About 160 items.

Mostly correspondence of David P. Hillhouse, with significant correspondence also for his brother-in-law Felix H. Gilbert; his parents, David Hillhouse and Sarah Porter Hillhouse; his two sisters, Sarah Hillhouse Gilbert and Mary Hillhouse Shepherd; and his niece Sarah Gilbert Alexander. Also included are scattered letters received by three generations of the Porter family of Hadley, Mass.

The letters to the Porter family were received 1775-1848 and are chiefly from their connections in Washington, Ga. There are two letters to Colonel Elisha Porter "in the American Camp Before Boston" in June 1775, one from Samuel Hopkins at Hadley, poignantly reporting the death of Porter's son, and one from D. Jewett at New London; four letters to Elisha Porter from his daughter Sarah after her marriage; and about a dozen letters scattered between 1804 and 1848 to Samuel, Abigail, and Elisha Porter from relatives in Georgia

Letters addressed to David P. Hillhouse begin with 1808. His most frequent correspondents were David Buel, Jr. (Troy, N. Y.), Oliver H. Prince (d. 1837), and Adam Leopold Alexander. Their correspondence (mostly 1820s-1840s) discusses politics and current events, including conflicts between whites and Cherokee Indians in 1836, the Nullification crisis, abolitionism, and the rise of the Whig party in Georgia. Letters to Hillhouse also deal with business and family affairs.

Between 1802 and 1813 personal correspondence of Felix H. Gilbert includes a number of letters to and from his wife and mother-in-law while he was traveling and attending the legislature at Milledgeville, 1807-1808. These letters discuss family and politics. Gilbert also frequently wrote David P. Hillhouse and other relatives concerning political affairs. Of interest are letters discussing the proceedings of the Georgia legislature (1808-1809) and the outbreak of the War of 1812 (including the invasion of Canada, 1812-1813).

Sarah Gilbert Alexander's correspondence appears primarily between 1813 and 1823. (Correspondence after her marriage in 1823 is filed in the Alexander subcollection.) Of note are two letters, probably written in 1822, from educator and antisuffragist Catharine Beecher, which comment on social news and Sarah's engagement to Adam L. Alexander. Several letters from Mary L. Hillhouse in 1823 discuss Catharine Beecher's emotional state after the sudden death of her fiancee, Professor Alexander Metcalf Fisher of Yale College. One letter, 12 July 1822, quotes Beecher on her feelings about Fisher's death.

Folder 45

1775-1792 #00011, Subseries: "4.1. 1775-1849." Folder 45

Folder 46

1802-1805 #00011, Subseries: "4.1. 1775-1849." Folder 46

Folder 47

1806 #00011, Subseries: "4.1. 1775-1849." Folder 47

Folder 48

1807-1808 #00011, Subseries: "4.1. 1775-1849." Folder 48

Folder 49

1809-1811 #00011, Subseries: "4.1. 1775-1849." Folder 49

Folder 50

1812 #00011, Subseries: "4.1. 1775-1849." Folder 50

Folder 51

1813-1814 #00011, Subseries: "4.1. 1775-1849." Folder 51

Folder 52

1815-1816 #00011, Subseries: "4.1. 1775-1849." Folder 52

Folder 53

1817-1818 #00011, Subseries: "4.1. 1775-1849." Folder 53

Folder 54

1819 #00011, Subseries: "4.1. 1775-1849." Folder 54

Folder 55

1820-1821 #00011, Subseries: "4.1. 1775-1849." Folder 55

Folder 56

1822-1823; 1825-1827 #00011, Subseries: "4.1. 1775-1849." Folder 56

Folder 57

1828-1833 #00011, Subseries: "4.1. 1775-1849." Folder 57

Folder 58

1834-1837 #00011, Subseries: "4.1. 1775-1849." Folder 58

Folder 59

1838-1842 #00011, Subseries: "4.1. 1775-1849." Folder 59

Folder 60

1843-1845 #00011, Subseries: "4.1. 1775-1849." Folder 60

Folder 61

1846-1849 #00011, Subseries: "4.1. 1775-1849." Folder 61

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 4.2. Undated (circa 1775-1849).

13 items.

Mostly letters of Felix H. Gilbert to his wife while Gilbert was traveling away from home. Letters discuss his travels through the Southeast and New England, family and financial matters, and news of friends. Miscellaneous family letters to Felix H. Gilbert and Sarah Gilbert Alexander also appear and focus mostly on family news.

Folder 62

Undated #00011, Subseries: "4.2. Undated (circa 1775-1849)." Folder 62

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 4.3. 1874-1923.

About 130 items.

The correspondence of Margaret P. Hillhouse of Yonkers, N.Y., who was gathering family data from members of the Hillhouse and Alexander families. The bulk of this correspondence appears in 1921 and consists of letters from the children and later descendants of Adam Leopold Alexander and Sarah Gilbert Alexander. Letters and their enclosures provide biographical, historical, and genealogical information on members of both families. Additional correspondence of Margaret P. Hillhouse, mostly relating to genealogy, may be found in the Jackson and Prince Family Papers in the Southern Historical Collection.

Folder 63

1874-1895 #00011, Subseries: "4.3. 1874-1923." Folder 63

Folder 64

1896-1920 #00011, Subseries: "4.3. 1874-1923." Folder 64

Folder 65

January-May 1921 #00011, Subseries: "4.3. 1874-1923." Folder 65

Folder 66

June-July 1921 #00011, Subseries: "4.3. 1874-1923." Folder 66

Folder 67

August-December 1921 #00011, Subseries: "4.3. 1874-1923." Folder 67

Folder 68

1922-1923 #00011, Subseries: "4.3. 1874-1923." Folder 68

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 5. Hillhouse Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1759, 1775-1851, and undated.

69 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

The earliest item in the series is a 1759 record of the expenditures of Sarah Taylor, a Hillhouse relative. Other early items include the commission of Elisha Porter as sheriff of Hampshire County, Massachusetts Bay, 1775, and Captain Josiah Lyman's account with Elisha Porter, including such items as "Billetting Roll" and "Recruiting," March-July 1776.

Most other items are legal papers of David P. Hillhouse. From 1798 to 1823 almost all legal and financial items pertain to the inheritance of Sarah Gilbert Alexander, which was managed by her uncles David P. Hillhouse and William G. Gilbert. These papers include wills, deeds, receipts, accounts, and affidavits. Of note are two pages from David P. Hillhouse's journal as her guardian written between 1823 and 1828.

From 1823 to 1851, almost all items relate to Hillhouse's plantation and business affairs. Included are a copy of his will; his passport (1845), his bank book with the Augusta Branch of the Bank of Georgia (1846-1851); lists of bond and notes owned by him (1847-1848); and a 52-page memorandum book for 1835-1849, which includes an inventory of his plantation, household, and personal property. This volume lists notes paid off, letters received, and other memoranda. A typed transcript of six pages, listing household and other property, is filed with the volume.

Folder 69

1759, 1775-1813 #00011, Series: "5. Hillhouse Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1759, 1775-1851, and undated." Folder 69

Folder 70

1814-1828 #00011, Series: "5. Hillhouse Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1759, 1775-1851, and undated." Folder 70

Folder 71

1833-1845 #00011, Series: "5. Hillhouse Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1759, 1775-1851, and undated." Folder 71

Folder 72

1835-1849, #00011, Series: "5. Hillhouse Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1759, 1775-1851, and undated." Folder 72

Memorandum book of David P. Hillhouse

Folder 73

1846-1851, #00011, Series: "5. Hillhouse Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1759, 1775-1851, and undated." Folder 73

Bank book of David P. Hillhouse

Folder 74

1847-1851 and undated #00011, Series: "5. Hillhouse Family: Financial and Legal Papers, 1759, 1775-1851, and undated." Folder 74

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 6. Hillhouse Family: Other Papers, 1811-1976.

55 items.

Arrangement: alphabetical.

Travel journals of David P. Hillhouse, genealogical material pertaining to the Hillhouse and other families, and miscellaneous items.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 6.1. Travel Journals, 1826 and circa 1826-1828.

3 items.

Two travel journals of David P. Hillhouse. The first journal (168 pages in two volumes) is dated 29 April 1826 to 16 January 1827, but appears to be an account written at a later time, probably from detailed notes. The journal describes, in significant detail, a trip Hillhouse took to visit relatives and tour in New York State, Connecticut, and Massachusetts. Among places described are a Jewish synagogue in Charleston, S.C.; the Connecticut legislature; a deaf and dumb asylum in Hartford, Conn.; a penitentiary in Auburn, N.Y.; Round Hill School; New York City High School; the Erie Canal; and the University of Virginia. The second volume ends with a summary of the contents of the two volumes, keyed to page numbers. A loose sketch of "the country around the Falls of Niagra" is included.

The second journal, written sometime between 1826 and 1828, documents a trip Hillhouse took to Washington and then to New England. Jotted down hurriedly, the journal gives little detail, but offers general information on his travels through South and North Carolina and Virginia; proceedings of the House of Representatives and the Supreme Court; and several industries (including clock and button factories) he saw in Connecticut.

Folder 75-76

Folder 75

Folder 76

Travel journal of David P. Hillhouse, 1826 #00011, Subseries: "6.1. Travel Journals, 1826 and circa 1826-1828." Folder 75-76

Folder 77

Travel journal of David P. Hillhouse, circa 1826-1828 #00011, Subseries: "6.1. Travel Journals, 1826 and circa 1826-1828." Folder 77

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 6.2. Genealogical Material, 1836-1976.

48 items.

Clippings, notes, printed publications, biographical sketches, and miscellaneous items relating to the genealogy of the Alexander, Porter, Baldwin, and Hillhouse families. Of note are an index to the New England ancestors of Lucie Harvie Hull Baldwin (undated) and handwritten genealogical extracts from a memorandum book kept by William Hillhouse in 1789 while on a trip to Ireland.

Folder 78

Clippings #00011, Subseries: "6.2. Genealogical Material, 1836-1976." Folder 78

Folder 79

Notes #00011, Subseries: "6.2. Genealogical Material, 1836-1976." Folder 79

Folder 80

Sketches and miscellaneous items #00011, Subseries: "6.2. Genealogical Material, 1836-1976." Folder 80

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 6.3. Miscellaneous Items, 1770, 1811, 1812, 1902, and undated.

6 items.

The earliest item is an astronomical almanack by Nathaniel Ames, printed in Boston in 1770. Interleaved pages include manuscript entries, presumably by a member of the Porter family of (North) Hadley, Mass. (perhaps by Sarah Porter Hillhouse's father or grandfather, Elisha Porter). Three entries include references to Bible verses, sermons, and family comings and goings, and a list of births and deaths, presumably of citizens of the town for the year. Other miscellaneous items are verses copied by Felix Gilbert in 1811; a prayer copied by Gilbert in 1812; a printed address entitled "The Confederate Veteran" made by General Edward Porter Alexander on Alumni Day (9 June 1902) at West Point's Centennial; a handwritten transcription of the lines Catharine Beecher had inscribed on the gravestone of Professor Fisher of Yale College, her fiance; and an undated handwritten poem (author unknown).

Folder 81

"Astronomical Almanack" with manuscript entries, 1770 #00011, Subseries: "6.3. Miscellaneous Items, 1770, 1811, 1812, 1902, and undated." Folder 81

Folder 82

Other miscellaneous items #00011, Subseries: "6.3. Miscellaneous Items, 1770, 1811, 1812, 1902, and undated." Folder 82

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated.

31 items.

Mostly photographs of Alexander and Hillhouse family members, with a few photographs of homes and landscapes.

Image P-11/1

Mary Clifford Alexander, at age 10, photograph of painting, 1840. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/1

Image P-11/2

Felix Alexander, circa 1870. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/2

Image P-11/3

Lucy Grattan Alexander, circa 1870-1880. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/3

Image P-11/4

Sarah Hillhouse Gilbert, photograph of painting, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/4

Image P-11/5

Sarah Porter Hillhouse, photograph of painting, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/5

Image P-11/6

Sarah Hillhouse Gilbert, photograph of painting, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/6

Image P-11/7

Asbury Hull, photograph of painting, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/7

Image P-11/8

Lucy Harvie, photograph of painting, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/8

Image P-11/9

Ella Alexander (?) as an infant, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/9

Image P-11/10

Samuel D. Smith, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/10

Image P-11/11

Pamela Porter Smith, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/11

Image P-11/12

Margaret Porter Smith, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/12

Image P-11/13

Abby Phillips Smith, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/13

Image P-11/14

Daniel H. Dickinson, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/14

Image P-11/15

Clarissa Alexander Smith, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/15

Image P-11/16

Henry F. B. Cooley, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/16

Image P-11/17

Hattie S. Thayer, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/17

Image P-11/18

Lucy C. Smith, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/18

Image P-11/19

Abigail Porter, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/19

Image P-11/20

Dorothea Kinselbach Schmidt, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/20

Image P-11/21

Unidentified young man, in uniform of Union private (?), circa 1860. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/21

Image P-11/22

Unidentified man, circa 1860-1870. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/22

Image P-11/23

Unidentified man (probably same as P-11/22), in Confederate general's uniform, circa 1865-1875. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/23

Image P-11/24

Unidentified man, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/24

Image P-11/25

Unidentified woman, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/25

Image P-11/26

Unidentified man, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/26

Image P-11/27

Gravesite of Edward Porter Alexander III, St. Nazare, France, 1918? #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/27

Special Format Image SF-P-11/28

House built in 1714 in which Colonel Elisha Porter was born in 1743, circa 1860 1870, stereoview. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." SF-P-11/28

Image P-11/29

Alexander family home, Washington, Georgia, mounted albumen print, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/29

Image P-11/30

View of trees at edge of dirt road, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/30

Image P-11/31

Small cemetery, surrounded by trees, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/31

Image P-11/32

Schmidt family seal, no date. #00011, Series: "7. Hillhouse Family: Pictures, 1840-1918? and undated." P-11/32

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 8. Hillhouse Family: Museum Item, circa 1835.

1 item.

One lead pencil, manufactured circa 1835, taken from a volume with a built-in holder (see David P. Hillhouse Memorandum Book in Series 5, dated 1835-1849).

Museum Item MU-11/1

Pencil #00011, Series: "8. Hillhouse Family: Museum Item, circa 1835." MU-11/1

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Items Separated

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Processing Information

Processed by: Allie Mae Blake, 1936; B. Allan, November 1963; and Jill Snider, July 1990, with subsequent revisions

Encoded by: ByteManagers Inc., 2008

Diacritics and other special characters have been omitted from this finding aid to facilitate keyword searching in web browsers.

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