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Collection Number: 04565

Collection Title: W. Horace Carter Papers, 1920s-1990s

This collection has access restrictions. For details, please see the restrictions.

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the FAQ section for more information.


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Size 9.0 feet of linear shelf space (approximately 2200 items)
Abstract W. Horace Carter (1921- ) of Tabor City, N.C., was a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, who was editor of the "Tabor City Tribune" and writer of books and articles on fresh-water fishing and deer and duck hunting. Office files containing correspondence, mostly with editors of outdoor recreation magazines; notes; drafts of writings; and other materials chiefly relating to W. Horace Carter's work as a free-lance writer specializing in works about fresh-water fishing and deer and duck hunting. Also included is a small number of items relating to awards Carter received during his career in journalism, including his time as editor of the Tabor City Tribune, and one photograph album containing pictures of Carter and his family.
Creator Carter, W. Horace.
Language English
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Restrictions to Access
Unprocessed. May be used with staff assistance.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the W. Horace Carter papers #4565, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Acquisitions Information
Received from W. Horace Carter of Hawthorne, Fla., in September 1990.
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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W. Horace Carter of Tabor City, Columbus County, N.C., and Hawthorne, Alachua County, Fla., was born in 1921. He was the first male graduate of Endy High School and went on to receive an A.B. degree in journalism from the University of North Carolina in 1944. In 1946, Carter took some of his G.I. Bill money from World War II service and, in partnership with others, opened the Tabor City Tribune, a weekly newspaper. Around 1950, he helped form the Atlantic Publishing Company, which published five small newspapers in North and South Carolina.

Carter received many honors during his journalistic career, two of the most prestigious resulting from his courageous battle against the Ku Klux Klan in the early 1950s. In 1953, as a result of his hard-hitting anti-Klan editorials and gutsy front-page coverage of Klan activities, the Tabor City Tribune received the first Pulitzer Prize awarded to a weekly newspaper. In addition, also in 1953, Carter's anti-Klan campaign led to his being named by the Jaycees as one of the top ten young men in America.

In later years, Carter has written several books, among them: Land That I Love (1980); Wild and Wonderful Santee Cooper Country (1981); "Buddy", Ernie Pyle, World War II's Most Beloved Typewriter Soldier (1982); Return to Cross Creek (1985); and Damn the Alligators (1989). He is also widely published as a free-lance writer specializing in works about fresh-water fishing and deer and duck hunting.

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Office files containing correspondence, mostly with editors of outdoor recreation magazines; notes; drafts of writings; and other materials chiefly relating to Carter's work as a free-lance writer specializing in works about fresh-water fishing and deer and duck hunting. Also included is a small number of items relating to awards Carter has received and photocopies of the images in a photograph album containing pictures of Carter and his family.

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Contents list

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Processing Information

Processed by: Roslyn Holdzkom, November 1990

Encoded by: ByteManagers Inc., 2008

Processing deferred due to expected additions.

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