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Collection Number: 04699

Collection Title: Club Records, 1932-1982

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the section for more information.


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Size 1.0 feet of linear shelf space (approximately 30 items)
Abstract The Club, a women's social group in Chapel Hill, N.C., that functioned from 1932 to 1982. The main purpose of the Club was "for the members to become better acquainted with each other over their mending bags and baskets," but most meetings also included short programs of "intellectual value" presented by each member in turn. Membership was limited to 12 persons. Minute books, 1932-1982, usually school notebooks of 50-100 pages, of the Club, with records of bi-monthly meetings chiefly written by the secretary-treasurer. Entries chronicle the Club's activities and sometimes contain information about other activities of Club members. Dramatic readings, dinners, garden parties, and picnics are documented, as well as discussions of books, music, current events, travel, decorating, feminism, and the arts in general. Some of the women read from their own work or displayed art of their own making. When no program was prepared, the members engaged in "informal conversation." Also included is some information about members' families, especially in the later years, when illnesses and grandchildren became frequent topics. Also included are some Club-related letters, lists of officers, and several versions of the Club's constitution.
Creator Club.
Language English
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Restrictions to Access
No restrictions. Open for research.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the Club Records #4699, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Acquisitions Information
Received from the estate of Mildred Cherry Hill in June 1994 (Acc. 94082).
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Biographical Information

The Club, a women's social group in Chapel Hill, N.C., function from 1932 to 1982. The first entry in the Club's minute books documents the organizational meeting and is quoted at length below. This entry sets forth the purpose and mode of operation of the Club, which changed little over its fifty-year existence:

On September 28, 1932, a group of faculty wives consisting of Mrs. Fessler, Mrs. Munch, Mrs. Hudson, Mrs. Peacock, Mrs. MacCarthy, Mrs. Miller, Mrs. Bailey and Mrs. Sharpe met at Mrs. Fessler's home to discuss the forming of a small club for social purposes, the members to become better acquainted with each other over their mending bags and baskets.

With Mrs. Miller acting as Chairman, a Constitution proposed by Mrs. Fessler was considered and the following articles were discussed and adopted:

I.The main purpose of the club shall be social, but a short program of some interest and intellectual value shall be given by the members in turn, at each meeting....

II.The name of the club shall be -- [an official name was never adopted].

III.The officers of the club shall consist of president, vice-president and secretary-treasurer. ..

IV.The membership shall be limited to twelve. New members shall be elected once each year ... by a unanimous vote of the members, by secret ballot. ... At least half of the new members ... shall be comparatively new (one to four years) in Chapel Hill. Absolute secrecy by every member, at all times, in regard to any name suggested for membership or voted upon, shall be regarded with utmost care. ... This one rule, the only thing of secret character about the club, is merely to prevent any unhappiness or unpleasant feeling ..

V.The club shall meet regularly every two weeks. ... The meetings shall be held at the homes of the members in turn, at 3:30 promptly. The hostess shall serve refreshments consisting of not more than two items, except upon rare occasions ..

VI.[The program committee shall make up an annual schedule of meetings.] The programs shall last, with exceptions, from half to three quarters of an hour. Mending is easy to do when listening to an interesting review of some recent book, good music, a play, etc. [Once a year, the club shall entertain husbands at a dinner or evening party, and there shall also be an annual picnic.]

VII.Dues shall be decided upon when the need arises.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Scope and Content

Minute books, 1932-1982, usually school notebooks of 50-100 pages, of the Club, with records of bi-monthly meetings chiefly written by the secretary-treasurer. Entries chronicle the Club's activities and sometimes contain information about other activities of Club members. Dramatic readings, dinners, garden parties, and picnics are documented, as well as discussions of books, music, current events, travel, decorating, feminism, and the arts in general. Some of the women read from their own work or displayed art of their own making. When no program was prepared, the members engaged in "informal conversation." Also included is some information about members' families, especially in the later years, when illnesses and grandchildren became frequent topics. Also included are some Club-related letters, lists of officers, and several versions of the Club's constitution.

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Contents list

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 1. Minute Books, 1932-1982.

13 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Minute books, usually school notebooks of 50-100 pages, of the Club, with records of bi-monthly meetings chiefly written by the secretary-treasurer. Entries chronicle the Club's activities and sometimes contain information about other activities of Club members, as in the annual fall ritual of reporting on summer vacations. Most of the entries are quite witty. The secretaries tended to add what one member called the "usual embellishments" to routine meeting reports. These elaborations chiefly consisted of personal comments on individual members, their homes, the programs they presented, and the food they served.

Dramatic readings, dinner, garden parties, and picnics are documented in these minutes, as well as discussions of books, music, current events, travel, decorating, feminism, and the arts in general. Some of the women read from their own work or displayed art of their own making. When no program was prepared, the members engaged in "informal conversation."

Also included is some information about members' families, especially in the later years, when illnesses and grandchildren became frequent topics of conversation. During World War II, the women of the Club may have produced handmade goods for the war effort during their meetings, but little mention of the war appears, except for a note on the how gasoline restrictions influenced attendance at Club meetings and functions.

Folder 1

1932-1935 #04699, Series: "1. Minute Books, 1932-1982." Folder 1

Folder 2

1935-1938 #04699, Series: "1. Minute Books, 1932-1982." Folder 2

Folder 3

1938-1940 #04699, Series: "1. Minute Books, 1932-1982." Folder 3

Folder 4

1940-1944 #04699, Series: "1. Minute Books, 1932-1982." Folder 4

Folder 5

1944-1947 #04699, Series: "1. Minute Books, 1932-1982." Folder 5

Folder 6

1948-1952 #04699, Series: "1. Minute Books, 1932-1982." Folder 6

Folder 7

1952-1956 #04699, Series: "1. Minute Books, 1932-1982." Folder 7

Folder 8

1956-1961 #04699, Series: "1. Minute Books, 1932-1982." Folder 8

Folder 9

1961-1963 #04699, Series: "1. Minute Books, 1932-1982." Folder 9

Folder 10

1964-1968 #04699, Series: "1. Minute Books, 1932-1982." Folder 10

Folder 11

1968-1973 #04699, Series: "1. Minute Books, 1932-1982." Folder 11

Folder 12

1973-1976 #04699, Series: "1. Minute Books, 1932-1982." Folder 12

Folder 13

1976-1982 #04699, Series: "1. Minute Books, 1932-1982." Folder 13

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 2. Other Materials, 1932-1972 and undated.

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Processing Information

Processed by: Roslyn Holdzkom, August 1994

Encoded by: ByteManagers Inc., 2008

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