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Collection Number: 01412

Collection Title: Charles William Dabney Papers, 1715-1945.

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the section for more information.


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Size 17.0 feet of linear shelf space (approximately 15000 items)
Abstract Charles William Dabney was a scientist, educator, and author. Also represented in the collection are four generations of his ancestors, including William Dabney (circa 1707-1772?); Charles Dabney (1745-1829); Charles William Dabney (1786-1833); Charles William Dabney (1809-1895); Robert Lewis Dabney (1820-1898); Lavinia (Morrison) Dabney (1823-1905); and James Morrison (fl. 1817-1865). Papers from 1716 to about 1833 consist of business and personal correspondence and other papers of William Dabney, Charles Dabney, and Charles William Dabney (1786-1833), and their relatives, chiefly in Hanover, King William, and Louisa counties, Va. These items concern tobacco planting and shipping and the purchase of merchandise, and post-Revolutionary War land acquisitions in Kentucky; plantation management; current events; and family activities. Papers of Robert Lewis Dabney, clergyman, teacher, Confederate staff officer and chaplain, concern Presbyterian church matters, Hampden-Sidney College, Union Theological Seminary of Virginia, the Civil War, a biography of Stonewall Jackson, and Dabney and Morrison family news from Virginia, Tennessee, and Texas. Other Civil War material includes original and photocopied correspondence from Robert E. Lee, and reports and casualty lists of the battle of Kernstown, 1862. There are also several letters from clergyman Benjamin Mosby Smith (1811-1893). Correspondence of Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) concerns projects of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; the development of mineral resources; the advancement of scientific, technical, agricultural, and general education; his education in Virginia and Germany; scientific work in state agencies in North Carolina, 1880-1887; his presidency of the University of Tennessee, 1887-1904, and of the University of Cincinnati, 1904-1920; conflict with German-Americans in Cincinnati; family matters as reflected in correspondence with his wife and other family members, 1877-1925; and the writing of his memoirs and works on educational history. Dabney's materials also include writings, addresses, scrapbook materials, and pictures. Volumes in the collection include ten 18th-century Virginia account books; James Morrison's sermon notes; and copies of family histories by William McPheeters, 1842, and John Blair Dabney, 1850.
Creator Dabney, Charles William, 1855-1945.
Language English
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Restrictions to Access
No restrictions. Open for research.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the Charles William Dabney papers #1412, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Alternate Form of Material
All or part of this collection is available on microfilm from University Publications of America as part of the Records of ante-bellum southern plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War, Series J.
Acquisitions Information
Received from Charles William Dabney (1855-1945). Materials grouped in Series 3 were transferred from the Southern Education Papers in 1955. Papers from the Southern Education Board Records Collection (#680) were transferred in November 1992 (Acc. 92164).
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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Charles William Dabney (1855-1945)

1855 Born, son of Robert Lewis Dabney and Lavinia Morrison Dabney.

1873 B.A. from Hampden-Sydney College at Farmville, Va.

1874-1877 Attended the University of Virginia at Charlottesville.

1877-1878 Taught chemistry at Emory and Henry College, Emory, Va.

1877-1878 Earned Ph.D. at Berlin and Gottingen, Germany.

1880-1887 Director of North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station and state chemist of North Carolina.

1880-1881 Taught chemistry at the University of North Carolina.

1881 Married Mary Brent of Paris, Ky.

1883-1884 In charge of government and state exhibits at New Orleans exposition.

1887-1904 President of the University of Tennessee.

1887-1890 Director of Tennessee Experiment Station.

1893-1896 Assistant Secretary, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.

1897 Special agent, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.

1902-1904 Head of "Summer School of the South," at Knoxville, Tenn.

1904-1920 President of the University of Cincinnati.

1920-1945 Retired educator and scientist, active writer. Universal Education in the South (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1936).

Other family members

Robert Lewis Dabney (1820-1898), Presbyterian clergyman and teacher, associated with Hampden-Sydney College and with the Union Seminary of Virginia at Farmville, Va., 1836-1837, 1844, and 1853-1883. He married Lavinia Morrison (1828-1908) in 1855, and together they had several children. During the Civil War he served with the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, first as a chaplain with the 18th Virginia Infantry Regiment in 1861, then as an officer on the staff of Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson in 1862. After the Jackson's death in 1863, Dabney wrote a biography of the general entitled Life and Campains of Lt. Gen. T. J. Jackson (Stonewall Jackson) (1866), and other works as well. A biographical essay on Robert Lewis Dabney can be found in the Dictionary of American Biography. He was the son of Charles William Dabney (1786-1833) and Elizabeth Price Dabney, and the brother of Charles William Dabney (1809-1895), who served during the Civil War, in 1861 and 1862, as the captain of Company C, 15th Virginia Infantry Regiment.

Charles William Dabney (1786-1833) was the son of Samuel Dabney and Jane Meriwether Dabney. Samuel Dabney was the son of William Dabney (born before 1708, died circa 1773) and Ann Barret Dabney.

Anne Barret Dabney was the daughter of Charles Barret and Mary Chiswell Barret. William Dabney was the son of George Dabney, and the grandson of Cornelius Dabney who probably came to New Kent County, Va., about 1649.

Charles Dabney (1745-1829), a son of William Dabney (see previous paragraph), served as an officer during the American Revolution in the 2nd Virginia State Regiment.

Related Morrison family members mentioned in these papers include clergyman James Morrison (fl.1817-1865), father of Lavinia Morrison Dabney and Henry Rutherford Morrison (who served during the Civil War in the 31st Va. Militia until his death in 1864); Mary Anna Morrison Jackson (1831-1915), born near Charlotte, N.C., who married Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson in 1857; and Mary Moore Morrison Smith, who married clergyman Benjamin Mosby Smith (1811-1893) in 1839.

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These papers document the life and work of Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) and provide considerable documentation for four generations of Dabney ancestors. There are letters, business papers, account books, and related papers for several Dabneys, especially William Dabney (circa 1708-1773?); Charles Dabney (1745-1829); Charles William Dabney (1786-1833); Charles William Dabney (1809-1895); Robert Lewis Dabney (1920-1898); Lavinia Morrison Dabney (1823-1905); James Morrison (fl.1817-1865); and Mary Chilton Brent Dabney (1861-1925).

The papers of Robert Lewis Dabney concern Presbyterian church matters (including correspondence with fellow clergyman Benjamin Mosby Smith); Hampden-Sydney College and the Union Theological Seminary near Farmville, Va.; Civil War service with the staff of Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson; Dabney's materials and drafts of his Life and Campaigns of Lt. Gen'l T. J. Jackson ('Stonewall Jackson'); travel; and family affairs.

Papers of Robert Lewis Dabney's son, Charles William Dabney (1855-1945), include extensive correspondence concerned with work of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, the advancement of scientific, technical, agricultural and general education, his education in Virginia and Germany, and his presidencies of the University of Tennessee (1877-1904) and the University of Cincinnati (1904-1920); personal correspondence with family members; drafts of memoirs and addresses; genealogical information; and pictures.

Most of this material was received in 1947 and 1948. Series 2 was restricted until 1969 at the request of Dabney family members; it is primarily private family correspondence between Charles William Dabney (1855-1945), Mary Chilton Brent Dabney, and their children. Thomas J. Jackson material and R.L. Dabney material transferred in 1955 from the Southern Education Board Papers (Collection #680) constitutes Series 3. Some of the other Confederate materials in the collection probably were added to his father's papers by Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) in the twentieth century.

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Contents list

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 1. Correspondence and Business Papers.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.1. 1716-1833.

The earliest papers are deeds and wills of members of the Dabney family. Papers of William Dabney of Hanover County, Va. begin with 1745; they begin to overlap in the 1760s with the papers of his son Charles. The papers for the rest of the eighteenth century are those of Charles Dabney of Hanover, his brothers George, Robert, and Samuel, and his sister Susanna, of Hanover and Louisa counties.

There is a deed of release, dated 11 October 1716, granted to George Dabney at King William County, from George Alves at New Kent County, with bond (fragment and photostat of missing part). There is George Dabney's patent to 400 acres in Hanover County, dated 9 July 1724. There is George Dabney's will, dated 24 October 1729, naming sons, daughters, grandchildren (William, Susannah, Sarah, Judith, and George Dabney, Mary Pettus and Mrs. Anderson) and property. There is a memorandum, dated 3 December 1741, of the will of Mary Barret (grandmother of George and William Dabney?). There is a letter dated 26 April 1743 from a London shipper to Esther Chiswell at Robert Barrett's, York River, Va., discussing mostly business matters.

Papers for the years 1746 to 1750 are chiefly those related to William Dabney at Hanover County, Va., as executor of the estates of Mrs. Esther Chiswell, George Dabney, and Major Morris. There are numerous accounts and receipts. There are also receipts from George Anderson, grandson of George Dabney, and various scattered bills and memoranda. There are receipts for slaves dated 13 January and 27 November 1746. There is a letter dated 2 July 1749 from William Dabney to Esther Chiswell (location not given) about shipping her tobacco and sowing oats.

Items from the 1750s include miscellaneous business papers of William Dabney, including correspondence with Morgan, Thomas, & Co. of Bristol about tobacco and merchandise accounts. There are also various papers of William Dabney concerning the affairs of Esther Chiswell and Edward Ambler. There is additional correspondence with other Bristol shippers and also James Gildart of Liverpool, including itemized lists of general merchandise sent out to William Dabney and tobacco received from him. There are miscellaneous items involving Stephen Pettus; Peter Randolph; an unnamed blacksmith; William Dudley; Robert Jennings; John Wright; Charles Crenshaw; Peter Mason; William Winston, Jr.; John Price; estates of William Morris and Henry Robinson; and others, referring mainly to business matters. There is a document, dated 6 March 1755, assigning William Dudley to be keeper of the Hanover County, Va., gaol under sheriff William Dabney. There is a list, dated 12 February 1755, of slaves and supplies "sent to Indian Creek" plantation. There is a letter, dated 16 April 1756, from William Winston, Jr., about paying a note [more about this affair in items dated April 1765]. In a letter dated 28 November 1756, to William Dabney, Edward Ambler wrote mostly about hogs, tobacco, and other matters of business. In a letter dated 5 March 1759, Dudley Digges, Jr., at York County, Va., wrote to William Dabney about hogs, horses, and tobacco, and about supplies needed. In a letter dated 28 May 1759, Edward Ambler wrote to William Dabney about a shipment of salt for his plantation being imported by Ambler which he wanted Dabney to store for him.

Items from the 1760s consist mostly of business papers of William Dabney involving English firms, Virginia customers, and ships and their captains. There are numerous accounts, invoices, letters, bonds, notes, receipts, and memoranda.

There is an invoice, dated 31 March 1760, of a shipment from London consigned to Edward Ambler. In a letter dated 29 May 1760, Edward Ambler wrote to William Dabney mostly about plantation matters--the Mill Dam; summer work; Ambler's account with Dabney; ruined tobacco; the purchase of a slave from a guinea ship on the James River. In a letter dated 14 October 1760, Patrick Henry, Jr., wrote to William Dabney about transferring a note to Richard Ambler. Samuel Gildart at Liverpool wrote in a letter, dated 20 March 1761, to William Dabney about his shipping accounts and the dull tobacco market caused by Virginia vessels bound for London being diverted to France. There is a 1762 account of William Dabney with Johnson & Boswell, a detailed bill for merchandise showing amounts and prices. There is a letter dated 18 February 1762 from Edward Ambler to William Dabney discussing various business matters such as a land sale, an estate settlement, supplies, and tobacco. There is a bond, dated 20 February 1762, of William Dickenson to William Dabney and others, to build a bridge over Taylors Creek for use of Hanover County residents. There are itemized accounts of William Dabney, 1763-1765, and correspondence with his English suppliers and Virginia customers. There are also a number of miscellaneous memoranda.

There are letters to William Dabney, dated 1765 to 1767, from Richard Ambler, James Buchanon & Co. of London, Edward Ambler (York and James Town, Va.), and accounts, dealing mostly with business and merchandise. There are invoices of shipments of general merchandise from Farell & Jones of Bristol and James Gildart of Liverpool. There is an agreement of sale, dated 22 March 1766, of 800 acres in Louisa County, Va., by William Phillips to Edward Ambler of York County, through William Dabney of Hanover County.

In a letter dated 11 November 1766, Dudley Digges, Jr., at Williamsburg, Va., wrote to William Dabney about an unpaid debt to Dabney, offering young slaves in settlement. In letters dated 20 January and 3 October 1767, Robert Carter Nicholas (1728-1780) at Williamsburg, Va., treasurer of the Virginia Colony, wrote to William Dabney, enclosing Dabney's account and informing him of his duty to prosecute collectors for all arrears. Edward Ambler, possibly to Charles Dabney, wrote about the melancholy prospects for his plantations, his overseer troubles, and related matters (14 July and 7 December 1767). There is a list of slaves (circa 1768) born 1765-1768 on Edward Ambler's estate at plantations in Hanover County "since I took possession."

There are numerous papers of William Dabney and also of his son Charles, who apparently assumed increasing responsibility for his father's affairs: these include accounts, deeds, and receipts, but mainly letters and papers relating to the plantation affairs of Edward Ambler at James Town. There is a letter, dated 15 December 1768, from Ambler's widow, Mary, about her late husband's business. There are some items relating to William and Charles Dabney and their business transactions with George Bartlett and John Boswell. There are two letters, January and February 1769 from William Nelson at Yorktown, Va., to William Dabney about plantation matters being handled by Dabney and his son Charles.

In a letter dated 22 March 1769, Robert Carter Nicholas at Williamsburg, Va., requested William Dabney to appraise and inventory the Edward Ambler estate in Hanover and Louisa counties. There is a letter, dated 1 April 1769, from John Blair, Jr., and Mary Ambler to Charles Dabney at Taylor's Creek about the Ambler estate business in Dabney's hands, and especially about a report from a slave of the cruelty of the present owner; there is also the draft of Dabney's reply in defense of the overseer. There are letters from April 1769 to William Dabney from George Dabney and Jane Dabney, mostly about health, weather, personal news, and business matters. There are also more miscellaneous accounts and receipts and memoranda on cash and crops. In a letter dated 20 December 1769, Mary Ambler at James Town wrote to Charles Dabney about the business of transferring her hogs, beef, mutton, and slaves from Hanover to James Town.

Items from 1770 to 1775 include various business papers of Charles Dabney relating to plantation affairs, the Ambler estate, and the William Dabney estate; correspondence and accounts with British shippers; and miscellaneous accounts, receipts, and other scattered business papers.

In a letter dated 3 March 1770, William Morris wrote to Charles Dabney about the enclosed will of Esther Chiswell, by which Morris thought he had a claim to William Dabney's estate. There are other papers relating to the estate of William Dabney including items of his widow Ann Barret Dabney, James Dabney, Joseph Dabney, and others, including accounts, receipts, and other business papers. In a letter dated 4 February 1771, Mary Ambler wrote to Charles Dabney about sending the year's supply of baby clothes for slaves, and discussing other plantation matters. There are also letters from Thomas and Rowland Hunt of London and from Robert Carter Nicholas at Williamsburg, discussing mostly business matters. There is a certificate dated 17 June 1772, concerning the reward allowed for returning a runaway slave from the Ambler estate. There is an agreement, dated 21 August 1772, between Charles Dabney and Ancel Clarkson, that Clarkson would be overseer on a tobacco plantation of the Ambler estate on shares; there is another agreement, also dated 21 August 1772, with Charles Nicholls to be overseer on a different plantation. There are letters, dated 2 November and 27 December 1772, from Mrs. Ambler at Williamsburg to Charles Dabney, mostly about supplies for and the general welfare of her slaves. For the year 1773 there are bills, receipts, and accounts for shoes, merchandise, blacksmith work, crops, and similar matters. There are bonds of Charles Dabney to Donald, Scot, & Co. of Glasgow, Scotland, and to William Nelson. In a letter dated 19 March 1773, Mary Ambler wrote to Charles Dabney mostly about her plantation. There are George Holland's physician's account for the years 1772 and 1773. In a letter of 25 August 1773, John Barret wrote to Charles Dabney, regretting he could not acquire a hammer for Dabney because of the scarcity of iron. In a letter dated 4 September 1773, Robert Carter Nicholas at Williamsburg, Va., asked Charles Dabney to investigate charges of cruelty which were brought against one of his overseers, noting that "few common overseers are to be trusted." In a letter dated 9 September 1773, George Clough at Rocky Mill, Va., wrote to Charles Dabney that he was taking in wheat. In a letter dated 16 September 1773, George Dabney, Jr., discussed how he was handling recently sawed lumber. There are account statements, dated 1773 and 1774, for the Edward Ambler estate with John Syme at Rocky Mill. There are documents dated 19 January 1774, relating to the division of slaves from William Dabney's estate, agreed upon by the legitees: George, Charles, Susanna, Robert, Samuel Dabney. There are various additional Dabney and Ambler estate papers such as receipts and business notes. There are business papers that were exchanged between the Dabneys and Charles Crenshaw and Robert Anderson in regard to the settling of the estate of William Dabney. In a letter dated 29 June 1774, Zachariah Stanley at Philadelphia wrote to a (Dabney?) friend; he mentioned smallpox in Yorktown, Va., a journey, and plans for farming. In a letter dated 1 November 1774, John Barrett at Richmond, Va., wrote to Charles Dabney mostly about merchandise and also his wife's illness. In notes dated 17 November 1774 and 20 December 1774, Thomas Hinds advised [the Dabneys?] about the ulcerated throat of "Ben." There are physicians accounts, 1774-1775, including Dr. George Holland's bill to Robert Dabney for treatment of the Ambler slaves. There is an account statement of Samuel Dabney with Spevis Bowman & Co., for dealing with Robert Burton.

For the years 1776 to 1783, there are military papers of Charles Dabney in his capacity as an officer in the 2nd Virginia State Regiment (infantry); also letters to him from his brother George Dabney; and miscellaneous business papers.

There are papers dated 1777 and 1778 relating to the 2nd Virginia, such as provisions and pay statements. In a latter dated 4 March 1776, Harry Tompkins requested from Charles Dabney a list of Dabney's men who took the oath of allegiance. There are payroll statements of Charles Dabney's company of minute men. [A number of these items are photoprints only, of originals which are apparently deposited in the Virginia Historical Society Library.] There is a contract, dated 22 February 1778, between Charles Dabney and John Hogan, waggoner, for one year. There are letters, dated 22 July and 24 October 1778, from George Dabney at Hanover, Va., to Charles Dabney, lieutenant-colonel, 2nd Va. Battalion, discussing home news, health of family members, rumors of French aid, prospects for corn and other plantation matters. There are additional military reports and papers from 1779, and more letters from George Dabney at Hanover, to Charles Dabney, mentioning affairs at home, such as mounting prices and increasing scarcities, taxes, crops, and Ann Dabney's cancer. In a letter dated 21 April 1779, Samuel Dabney at Cub Creek, Louisa County, wrote to Charles Dabney mostly about family and personal matters. In a letter dated 21 April 1779, Robert Morris wrote to Charles Dabney, mostly about the waggoning business they were mutually engaged in. In a letter dated 4 August 1779, George Dabney wrote to Charles Dabney, mentioning the legislature's attempt to regulate inflationary prices. There is the will of Anne Dabney, dated 20 December 1779. There is a land patent (photostat only) dated 3 March 1780, to Charles Dabney for a tract in Nelson County, Va. Additional material includes a blacksmith's bill and a deed. In a letter dated 22 February 1780, John Overton wrote to Charles Dabney about the organization of the two Virginia state regiments. There is a photoprint of a letter dated 7 July 1781, from the Marquis de Lafayette, giving his account of recent action and directions for future action. There is a photoprint of a memorandum of the articles of capitulation of Charles Earl Cornwallis; also of a dinner invitation to Charles Dabney from George Washington. There are also photoprints of other military papers relating to supplies and troops.

For 1782, there are photoprints of military papers of Charles Dabney at Yorktown, Portsmouth, and Richmond, Va., chiefly relating to quartermaster business. There are communications with Alexander Dick, John Hudson, and others, mostly about business. There is Charles Dabney's financial account, 1775-1783, with John Barret, settled in 1791.

Materials from the period 1783 to 1800 include correspondence and business papers of Charles Dabney and to some extent of his brothers George, Robert, and Samuel Dabney, his sister Susanna Dabney, and his mother Anne Dabney. They are largely concerned with the acquisition and surveying of Kentucky lands granted as military bounties to Virginians serving in the Revolutionary army; general accounts with John Barret, Fenwick & Dabney, Puckett, Pollard, & Johnston, and Micajah Crew; numerous notes and bonds and arrangements for exchanging them, paying them, and renewing them; the settling of estates; and miscellaneous deeds for lands and slaves, and bills and receipts.

There is a bond dated 22 July 1783 from Charles Dabney to John Syme at Hanover County, Va. In a letter (photostat) dated 21 October 1783, J[---] Hudson at Richmond wrote to [---?] about a business deal involving the disposition of ship--timber and coals. There is a bill of sale, dated 6 December 1783, for a slave sold by William Phillips to Charles Dabney. There is an account dated 17 December 1783 of Charles Dabney with John Barret & Co. at Richmond. 1784. There is a bond of George, Charles, Robert, and Samuel Dabney to Samuel Nicholas. There are true copies of certificates relating to certain tracts, and Charles Dabney's military warrants. 1785. There are bonds involving Charles and George Dabney, with Benjamin Forsythe, Wilson Miles Carey, and George Potter. There are several letters to Charles Dabney from his surveyors at Louisville and Danville, Ky., reporting on their activities in connection with surveying lands on the Cumberland River. 1786. There are also additional business papers, including receipts, memoranda, and general merchandise accounts. In a letter dated 11 January 1787, [---?] Mitchell wrote to Samuel Dabney about beef and news of a recent destructive fire in Richmond. There is a receipt, dated 5 July 1787, of Charles Dabney, for taxes and other accounts with the sheriff. In a letter dated 3 April 1788, Samuel Nuckols wrote to George Dabney transferring an obligation of six pounds. There is a copy of resolutions of U.S. Congress, dated 17 July 1788, concerning bounties for Virginia soldiers south of the Ohio River, which nullified claims north of that river. In a letter dated 23 July 1788, George Dabney explained the status of and interest on a bond to General [---?] Nelson. There are additional business papers, mostly concerned with debts and notes.

1789. There are business papers involving George and Charles Dabney, executors of William Dabney, a debt to Robert Nelson, a bond to William Nelson, and signatures of John Barret & Co., and George Dabney. There is a receipt for expenses dated 29 August 1789, W[---?] Croghan at Louisville, Ky.; there is a letter to Charles Dabney largely concerning the validity of land entries for tracts north of the Ohio River, including efforts to prompt decisions from Congress and the courts. There are papers (1789?) regarding a settlement among the Dabney family in regard to a sale of slaves. In a note dated 16 July 1790, Charles Dabney stated his debt of ten pounds to William Morris for a horse. There is an agreement dated 14 April 1791, for the division of lands of Charles and Edward Johnston, by George and Charles Dabney. There are also additional accounts, deeds, receipts, and bills of sale for slaves and land.

Items for the years 1792 to 1797 include business papers of Charles and Samuel Dabney (accounts, receipts, bills), and correspondence about legal entanglements connected with land in Kentucky. There is an account of the estate of Benjamin Dickenson, to Thomas Grubbs, with expenses for board, schooling, and clothes for the Dickenson children.

There is a certificate dated 6 August 1795 stating that John Pendleton was justice of the peace in Henrico County, Va., signed by James Wood, Lieutenant Governor of Virginia, on a document in which Charles Dabney gave Benjamin Forsythe power of attorney. In a letter dated 29 August 1795, John Lee of Kentucky, wrote to Charles Dabney about arrangements and taxes for Kentucky lands. For the year 1795, there are additional bills of sale, bonds, and receipts for taxes. There is an account of Charles Dabney with Fenwick & Dabney, 1793-1797, stating interest to 1808. In a letter dated 13 January 1796, Abraham Chapline at Kentucky wrote to Charles Dabney about military bounty lands; the obligations of the Commonwealths of Virginia and Kentucky; and how to handle individual tracts. In a letter dated 2 June 1796, John Lee at Woodford County, Ky., wrote to Charles Dabney about land affairs which Lee managed for Dabney in Kentucky. In a letter dated 16 July 1796, William Dabney at Richmond, Va., wrote to his uncle Charles Dabney about various business matters. There are accounts and an appraisement of the estate of Susanna Dabney with Charles Dabney, 1796-1797. In letters dated 5 August and 15 December 1797, Charles Johnston at Richmond, Va., wrote to Charles Dabney about investing the latter's funds on the market and selling him a slave. In a letter dated 31 January 1798, Edward Johnston informed Charles Dabney that he was sending 16 volumes of an encyclopedia by wagon (purchased from Archibald Currie, agent of Thomas Dobson who published them in Philadelphia). In a letter dated 30 July 1798, Mathew Anderson wrote to Charles Dabney with instructions on the repair of a dwelling, fencing and other matters of "Goldmine" plantation property. There is a two-year lease, dated 24 August 1798, of "Goldmine" to Zachariah Walden of Caroline, Va., drawn up by Charles Dabney as agent for Mathew Anderson. There is an agreement, dated 8 October 1798, of William Dabney, Jr. at Lexington, Ky., with George Bryant about Kentucky lands given to the former by Charles and George Dabney of Hanover, Va. There are more accounts for 1799 of Charles Dabney with Micajah Crew and with Puckett, Pollard, & Johnston.

There is a letter dated 20 January 1800 from John Marshall, then in Congress, to Charles Dabney, commenting on the report of the Secretary of War, the state of national finances, the notices for defense expenditures and unavoidable debt, and the infallibility of future resources of America. He argued that any reduction in the militia must be delayed as long as the French question was unresolved. There is a broadside, dated 26 May 1800, entitled "An Address to the Voters for Electors of President of the United States, in the State of Virginia," with a list of electors on the American Republican ticket. In a letter dated 31 May 1800, William Morris, Jr. wrote to James Henry, asking him to send on any passing wagon with whiskey for sale. There is a document, dated June 1800, relating to the estate of Benjamin Dickinson and Thomas Grubbs (who married Dickinson's widow). There are also miscellaneous bills and receipts of Charles and Samuel Dabney. There is a letter, dated 3 July 1801, from Charles Johnston at Richmond, to Charles Dabney about stock purchased for Dabney; there is a memorandum of Richard Morris dated 7 July 1826, about money left in George Dabney, Sr.'s desk. There are documents related to land, including leases, sales, claims; a promissory note, and a bond to William Morris, Sr. There are letters dated 3 February and 19 August 1802, from James Dabney to Charles Dabney, describing in detail the financial plight. There are also miscellaneous receipts to Samuel Dabney. There are fire insurance policies dated 24 February 1802, on plantation buildings of Charles Dabney at Hanover, Va. In a letter dated 14 September 1803, Thomas Price at Woodland, Va., wrote to Charles Dabney? about religion and his own disbelief.

March 1804, items relating to the court case Henry vs. Joyce. There is a deed dated 9 June 1804 of Samuel and wife Jane Dabney to Charles Dabney for some Hanover County land. In a letter dated 15 July 1804, J[---?] Moore at Lexington, Ky., wrote to Charles Dabney about Morris' embarrassment arising from having gone on a note from William Dabney, Jr. In a letter dated 13 October 1804, Frank Dabney at Pittsylvania Court House, Va., wrote to his uncle Charles Dabney, reporting on his progress in practicing law and expressing appreciation for the latter's help.

For the year 1805, there are mostly business papers of Charles Dabney, and some of Samuel Dabney, including a deed for land, a receipt for bank shares, accounts for merchandise, bills, and receipts. John Dabney at Campbell County, Va., wrote to his uncle Charles Dabney about business and family matters. In a document dated, 28 December 1805, Charles Dabney assigned power of attorney to Charles Dabney, Jr., for handling stocks and related business matters of the Bank of Virginia. There is a memorandum concerning an evaluation of property for the Mutual Insurance Company. For the year 1806, in addition to miscellaneous business papers, there is a letter dated 23 March 1806 from E[---?] Winston to Charles Dabney in regard to Patrick Henry manuscripts sent to Dabney for the use of Mr. [---?] Wirt--hoping that some parts would remain unpublished. In a letter dated 14 March 1807, Jane Dabney wrote to Elizabeth Price at Woodland, Va., about the activities of young people. In an affidavit dated 24 July 1807, Samuel Richardson denied the unpatriotic pro-British sentiment which rumor said Charles Dabney made to Richardson, and which Richardson had allegedly repeated to Charles Goodall. In a letter dated 8 August 1807, Charles Johnston at Richmond explained to Charles Dabney the present refunding of government bonds. An 1807(?) statement refuted the rumor that Charles Dabney had neglected his sick soldiers. There are items relating to Charles Dabney's withdrawal from the Mutual Assurance Society, both for buildings of the State of Virginia and for those in his own name. There are letters, dated 1809, from Charles Dabney, Jr., at Richmond, to his uncle Charles Dabney about business he attended to there for the latter; he advised against investing in the James River Company, except for a return in the remote future. In a letter dated 1 October 1809, Richard Dabney at Louisa, Va., wrote to his uncle Charles Dabney about plans for his school course and for eventually studying natural science. For 1813, there is a plat of a farm on Cub Creek, Va., and other property owned by Charles Dabney. There are a series of bills and receipts kept by John D. Andrews in account with Richmond merchants and other Virginians, apparently on behalf of Charles Dabney. There is also Jane Dabney's account with Charles Dabney, for the years 1812 to 1814. In personal letters dated 20 and 24 February 1814, Charles Dabney, Jr., at Salem and Abingdon, Va, wrote to Betsy Dabney, describing his horseback trip westward through Virginia on his way to attend business in Nashville, Tenn, and Lexington, Ky. In a letter dated 20 April 1814, William Dabney, Jr., at Richmond, wrote to his sister about a dress he purchased for her and other family matters. In a letter dated 20 June 1814, Elizabeth Dabney at Raleigh, N.C., wrote to Mrs. Elizabeth Dabney at Louisa County, Va., describing how happy she was in Raleigh, mentioning the Academy, students, and financial arrangements with her brothers. There is a letter (fragment) dated 5 September 1814, from Camp Fairfield about hardships of the soldiers, the writer's attempts to get a substitute for himself, and his needs.

In a letter dated 22 April 1815, Frank Dabney at Danville, Va., wrote to his mother, Jane Dabney, at Jacksonville, Louisa County, Va., of his brother Samuel Dabney's family, Samuel's wife Mildred Dabney dying of consumption, and his recent trip. There is a bond, dated 6 June 1815, of William, George, and Charles Dabney to William Morris, Sr., for 40 pounds. In a letter dated 1 July 1815, Frank Dabney at Danville to his sister Mildred M. Dabney at Jacksonville, Va., reporting the death of Mildred Dabney, and other family news. In a letter dated 23 August 1815, Elizabeth T. Dabney wrote to her brother (unnamed), mentioning members of the family and telling of her teaching situation under a Mr. Truehart. In a letter dated 29 October 1815, Alexander Balmain at Winchester, Va., aged 77, wrote to Charles Dabney at Hanover, Va., requesting Dabney to take his place at a meeting of the Society of the Cincinnati at Richmond in December, and advising Dabney of his (Balmain's) wishes in regard to the distribution of the Society's charitable funds. In a letter dated 23 November 1815, Samuel Dabney wrote to his mother Jane Dabney, telling of his plans to move his slaves to Tennessee along with himself and family, eventually, except Martha who would remain at school at Salem, Va. There is a document that granted power of attorney from Charles Dabney to Frank Dabney at Richmond, to handle certificates of debt due from the U.S. Government, dated 1817. There is a letter dated 26 September 1817, from Frank Dabney at Richmond to Mildred Dabney, telling of the opening of the New Eagle Hotel, and family and personal matters.

There are three letters dated 1818 from John T. Dabney at the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia, to his mother Jane Dabney at Louisa County, Va., and to his sister Miss Elizabeth Dabney; mentioned is the death of a Dr. Wistar; the contrast between Philadelphians and Virginians; that William Minor was about to return to Virginia with his M.D., and other news. 23 July 1818, Robert Pollard at Richmond to Charles Dabney about investments and banking. In a letter dated 26 November 1818, Alexander Balmain at Winchester wrote to Charles Dabney at Richmond about the disposition of the Society of Cincinnati's funds, in order of preference: the Episcopal Seminary; the University of Virginia near Charlottesville; and Washington College at Lexington, Va. There is a deed dated 14 December 1818, for Kentucky land from Charles Dabney to his nephew Charles Dabney, Jr. There are miscellaneous business papers including bills and accounts of Jane Dabney.

Writing in a letter dated 3 January 1819, John T. Dabney at Port Royal, Montgomery County, Tennessee, described to his sister, Miss Mildred M. Dabney at Louisa County, Va., his stay with Dr. Hopson, the people in Tennessee, their easy manners, and other details. In a letter dated 8 January 1819, Frank Dabney at Richmond wrote to Richard Dabney about business matters there. There is an account statement dated 1 February 1819 between Jane Dabney and Dabney & Price. In a letter dated 18 May 1819, Robert [son of Robin] Dabney at Fort Claiborne, Arkansas Territory, asked his uncle Charles Dabney to pay for the purchase of a place in Arkansas, as his leather had not yet come into market. There are forms for proxies for an annual meeting of the directors of the Bank of Virginia. There is an agreement dated 3 May 1820, of William Dabney?, Charles Dabney?, and Richard Morris, Jr., in regard to the support of their sister Miss Catharine after the death of William Morris, Sr. (Charles Dabney was the agent for this arrangement). There are more accounts of Jane Dabney with Charles Dabney, scattered deeds, and miscellaneous receipts. In a letter dated 14 June 1820, John T. Dabney at Port Royal, Tenn., wrote to Charles Dabney, Jr., at Louisa County, Va., about purchasing the latter's claim to Kentucky lands, mentioning family news and inquiries. In a letter dated 26 December 1820, Frank Dabney at Meriville, Ky., to Charles Dabney, described the land and its yield--tobacco and corn; and the fortunate situation of brother Samuel Dabney seven miles from Clarksville. In a letter dated 25 April 1822, Elizabeth Dabney described to a brother plans to take trips in Virginia when the school she was teaching at was out of session. In a letter dated 17 July 1822, W[---?] F. Micou at Richmond to Charles Dabney inquired about the claim of his wife's grandfather, John Lee of Essex, to Kentucky lands. There is a letter dated 5 September 1822, an inquiry by Richmond Terrell concerning a land claim on the basis of his father William Terrill's service as a lieutenant during the American Revolution. There is a bill to Barbara W. Pettus, for her son Samuel Pettus' board, books, and shoes for one year with Samuel Mosby. In a letter dated 26 April 1824, John T. Dabney at Montgomery, Tenn., wrote to his uncle Charles Dabney, Sr., giving his complete financial history since he came to Tennessee to practice medicine, and asking for a loan; he mentioned other family members, including his wife, a daughter of Governor Willie Blount (1768-1835); there are also statements from John Dabney's brother Samuel Dabney and his relative Charles Meriwether that they would secure the loan).

In a letter dated 28 January 1825, Charles Dabney, Jr., wrote with advice to his son Charles William Dabney (usually addressed as William) at school at William Nelson's. There is an agreement of partnership of Woodruff(?) and Frank Dabney at St. Francisville dated 10 April 1825. In a letter dated 11 July 1825, Dr. Carter Berkeley at Edgewood wrote to John D. Andrews, agent of Charles Dabney, Sr., about the latter's recent illness, present health, and account. In a letter dated 5 August 1825, Dr. Charles Dabney, nephew, sent Charles Dabney, Sr., detailed instructions for taking care of his ailments.

There is a typed copy of a letter dated 26 July 1826 from Judge John Marshall to Charles Dabney, stating that Congress's liberality included the Continental Line only and did not extend to the 1st and 2nd Virginia State Regiments. In a letter dated 22 September 1826, H[---?] R[---?] Lewis and Mildred Lewis suggested to their nephew Charles William Dabney that he should teach in their neighborhood the next year. There is an agreement, dated 22 September 1826, between William Richardson and John D. Andrews for Richardson's land to be worked on shares for 1827. (Andrews was apparently handling Charles Dabney, Sr.'s affairs).

For the years 1827 to 1833, there are miscellaneous bills and accounts, chiefly of Barbara Pettus and John D. Andrews, for supplies, physician's services, drugs, and merchandise. In a letter dated 25 August 1828, Will Broadus at Culpeper wrote to Charles Dabney, asking advice about the status of his claim as a state militia man in the Revolutionary War, to land bounties granted to the Continental Line by the U.S. Government and to the state militia by the state legislature. In a document dated 15 November 1828, Charles Dabney, Jr., and Elizabeth Dabney, at Louisa County, Va., granted power of attorney to Charles William Dabney in regard to their Kentucky land claims. In a letter dated 30 September 1829, Mildred M. Lewis gave an account of her religious experience. There is an 1830 paper relating to the hiring of Barbara W. Pettus's slaves. There is an inventory and appraisement, dated 7 January 1830, of Charles Dabney's personal estate, by three commissioners, William Wingfield, Bellamy Vaughan, and John D. Andrews, under order of the Hanover Court. There are at least five letters from Charles Dabney at Louisa, Va., to his son Charles William Dabney at Hanover, Va., in which he advised the latter about plantation business and specific practical problems such as the care of saddles, slaves, and wheat crops. In a letter dated 20 August 1830, John D. Andrews wrote to Charles William Dabney at Hanover, about supplying shoes and confiding that he (Andrews) hoped to marry Dabney's cousin Eugenia [Price?]. There is an agreement of rent, dated 16 August 1830, between Charles Barret and John M. Price.

For the years 1831 to 1833 there are occasional letters from Charles Dabney to Charles William Dabney, mostly about personal, family, and plantation matters. In a letter dated 6 December 1831, Mrs. M[---?] W. Morris wrote to Charles William Dabney, mostly about business matters.

There is a letter dated 20 January 1832, from Elizabeth Dabney to her brother, written from Washington, D.C., where she was stranded due to snow, on her way home from Baltimore, trying to make plans for Edmund Dabney who was very ill. There is correspondence from February 1832 between Charles Dabney and Charles William Dabney mostly about plantation matters; the latter was admitted to the bar around this time. There are four letters dated May 1832 from Charles Dabney to Betsey his wife while he was in Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Washington, in which he described his journey by stage to Richmond, by ship to Baltimore, and by ship and horse-car to Philadelphia for the Presbyterian Assembly; he also described Philadelphia, the business of the Assembly, and the trip home.

In a letter from 1833, Elizabeth Dabney wrote to her son, Charles William Dabney, chiefly about home news from Louisa County. In a letter dated 7 April 1833, Reuben Lewis wrote to Charles William Dabney, for help in obtaining the pedigree of a mare he recently bought. In a letter dated 27 July 1833, Charles Dabney wrote to Charles William Dabney, mentioning a wheat harvester and a meeting of Goochland and Louisa Railroad stockholders. There is a notice, from September 1833, of the death of Charles Dabney of Louisa County, Va. There is the will, dated 11 November 1833, of Charles Dabney. In a letter dated 22 November 1833, Reuben Lewis wrote to Charles William Dabney, mentioning the funeral of Charles Dabney. There are papers, dated 26 December 1833, relating to the estate of Samuel Dabney (Frank Dabney, executor).

Undated material prior to 1834 consists mostly of numerous miscellaneous business receipts.

Folder 1

1716-1743 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 1

Folder 2

1746-1753 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 2

Folder 3

1754-1756 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 3

Folder 4

1757-1759 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 4

Folder 5

1760-1761 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 5

Folder 6

1762 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 6

Folder 7

1763 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 7

Folder 8

1764-1765 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 8

Folder 9

1766-1767 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 9

Folder 10

1768 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 10

Folder 11

1769 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 11

Folder 12

1770-1771 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 12

Folder 13

1772-1773 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 13

Folder 14

1774-1775 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 14

Folder 15

1776-1778 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 15

Folder 16

1779 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 16

Folder 17

1780-1781 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 17

Folder 18

1782-1783 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 18

Folder 19

1784-1785 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 19

Folder 20

1786-1788 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 20

Folder 21

1789-1791 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 21

Folder 22

1792-1794 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 22

Folder 23

1795-1796 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 23

Folder 24

1797 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 24

Folder 25

1798-1799 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 25

Folder 26

1800 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 26

Folder 27

1801-1802 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 27

Folder 28

1803-1804 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 28

Folder 29

1805 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 29

Folder 30

1806-1807 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 30

Folder 31

1808-1812 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 31

Folder 32

1813-1815 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 32

Folder 33

1816-1818 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 33

Folder 34

1819-1820 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 34

Folder 35

1821-1824 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 35

Folder 36

1825-1827 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 36

Folder 37

1828-1829 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 37

Folder 38

1830-1831 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 38

Folder 39

1832 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 39

Folder 40

1833 #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 40

Folder 41-42

Folder 41

Folder 42

Undated (before 1834) #01412, Subseries: "1.1. 1716-1833." Folder 41-42

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.2. 1834-1860.

Papers for the years 1834-1842 are chiefly those of Charles William Dabney at Montpelier, Hanover County, Va., his brother Robert Lewis Dabney, and their mother Elizabeth Dabney at Louisa County, Va.

In a letter dated 17 February 1834, Reubeun Lewis wrote to Charles William Dabney, mostly about plantation matters and miscellaneous business. In a letter dated 28 March 1834, Andrew Stevenson (1784-1857) wrote to Charles William Dabney, acknowledging receipt of a pension case to be looked into, and commenting on the coming elections and politics. In a letter dated 12 October 1834, John A. Morris wrote to Charles William Dabney about plantation and personal affairs. In a note dated 19 October 1834, James Fontaine at Taylor's Creek, invited Charles William Dabney to his wedding. In a letter of 18 November 1834, Robert L. Dabney, aged 14, wrote to his older brother Charles William Dabney about plantation and family news.

For the years 1836 to 1837, there are six letters from Charles William Dabney to Robert Lewis Dabney at Hampden-Sydney College, Prince Edward County, in which he discussed social life, crops, the death of Samuel Pettus, family news, and much abstract and theoretical advice about life, society, and philosophy. In a letter dated 3 July 1837, Francis A. Williamson at Cincinnati, Ohio, wrote to Charles William Dabney, lecturing on phrenology, giving Dabney flattering opinions and asking for news of Elizabeth Wingfield with whom he had tried to elope. In a letter dated 13 September 1837, Mildred M. Lewis at Hardin's Tavern, Va., wrote to her sister Miss Elizabeth Dabney at Jackson, Louisa County, Va., chiefly about orphaned relatives who were turned over to Col. and Mrs. Johnson of Tennessee [John Dabney's children?]. In a letter dated 20 December 1837, Thomas Hord wrote to Charles William Dabney about Charles Dabney's Revolutionary War claims. In a letter dated 27 June 1838, Lavinia Morrison at Blooming Green wrote to her sister Miss Mary Morrison at Charleston, [West] Virginia, about new songs, weddings, and other local events. In a letter dated 15 December 1838, from Mildred M. Lewis at Winchester, Tenn.?, to her sister, Elizabeth T. Dabney at Louisa County, she described a trip through Kentucky and Tennessee and provided an account of the Meriwethers, Dabneys, and other relatives in that area.

For the years 1840 to 1842, there are 16 letters from Charles William Dabney at Louisa, Va., to Robert Lewis Dabney at the University of Virginia at Charlottesville, discussing plantation affairs, miscellaneous topics of current interest and philosophical matters. There are two items relating to cousin J[---?] Fontaine's personal bond to Charles William Dabney. In a letter dated 10 July 1841, William B. Dabney at Richmond wrote to Charles William Dabney at Goochland, Va., about a law suit in connection with the Wharton estate. There is correspondence between Charles William Dabney, his cousin Harriet Richardson at Richmond, Va., and at Montrose, and cousin William L. King in the North, concerning the complicated legal and financial affairs of Harriet Richardson. Charles William Dabney apparently handled Harriet Richardson's business affairs for her and her family. There are 1843 letters to Robert Lewis Dabney at Thompson's Cross Roads, Louisa County, Va., from Charles William Dabney and from Mildred Lewis at Hardin's Tavern, Va., with local news and descriptions of daily life. There are letters from William L. King to Charles William Dabney about law suits centering around the property of Harriet Richardson, and from Benjamin Watkins legatees, and E[---?] F. Wickham, about business matters. There are also letters to Francis Dabney.

There are 1844 letters from Mildred M. Lewis at Valley Point, Va., to her sister Elizabeth T. Dabney at Thompson Cross Roads and to Robert L. Dabney about family and household news, visits, small trips, and illnesses. There are additional business items relating to the Benjamin Watkins estate and to Harriet Richardson's affairs. There are letters from Mildred Dabney, living with Mildred Lewis, to other members of the family, mostly about personal and family matters. There are also letters written by George Woodson Payne and Anne E. Dabney Payne about home and farm matters (Anne was a sister of Robert Lewis Dabney and Charles William Dabney). There are scattered items relating to Charles William Dabney's law practice. In a letter dated 1 December 1844, Charles William Dabney wrote to Robert Lewis Dabney at the Union Theological Seminary near Prince Edward Court House, Va., about personal matters.

There are, for the years 1845 to 1847, chiefly letters to Robert Lewis Dabney (at Seminary 1845-1846; at Thompsons Cross Roads, November 1846; at Barter Brook in Augusta County, Va., June 1847) from Charles William Dabney and from Mildred M. Lewis. Charles William Dabney's letters to his younger brother were a steady series through the years. They touch at every conceivable topic; besides being discursive they are verbose. There was also correspondence among various members of the family: Charles William Dabney at Montpelier, Va., Anne E. Payne, Mrs. Elizabeth Dabney, and George Woodson Payne at Thompsons Cross Roads, with mention of family news, neighborhood activity, crops and other farm matters, the death of Mildred Dabney in 1845, and miscellaneous family troubles. There are business letters to Charles William Dabney from: V. W. Southall at Charlottesville, Va., 5 October 1845; James A. Seddon at Washington, D.C., 27 January and 26 March 1846, about the claim of a constituent and also discussing national policy in regard to Oregon, etc.; William Seldon and Richard Randolph at Washington, D.C., February and March 1847, about the claim of Charles Dabney's heirs. Randolph explained that these could be accomplished only by bribery and indirect methods; he discussed politics, the administration, the spoils system, and his own fees in cases.

In letters dated 27 April and 7 June 1847, Benjamin M. Smith at Staunton, Va., wrote to Robert Lewis Dabney, in regard to Dabney's being installed and ordained at Tinkling Springs Church and giving the text for Dabney's trial sermon. Robert Lewis Dabney at Augusta County, Va., in a letter to his sister Elizabeth Dabney, reported on his travels and visits with relatives. In a letter dated 3 August 1847, Charles William Dabney wrote to Robert Lewis Dabney at Barter Brook mostly about the wheat market. Other letters from Charles William Dabney to Robert Lewis Dabney and Mildred Lewis mention family, personal, and neighborhood matters. Charles William Dabney provided his brother with advice and personal philosophy.

Papers for 1848 are mostly of Robert Lewis Dabney at Barter Brook, Augusta County, Va., Charles William Dabney, and Mildred Dabney Lewis of Louisa County, Va. There are many letters from Charles William Dabney to Robert Lewis Dabney, and from Mildred Dabney Lewis to both brothers. These letters are concerned with Robert Lewis Dabney's marriage; Mildred Lewis's illness and the affairs and arrangements which Charles William Dabney attended to for her; the birth of a son to Charles William Dabney's wife on 11 May 1848; and Mildred Dabney Lewis's trip to Staunton in July 1848. There are also business letters to Charles William Dabney at Montpelier, Hanover County, Va., about legal cases and also about the Dabney claim against the U.S. Government for land due to Charles Dabney of the Revolutionary War. Among the correspondents were Dr. Thomas P. Shields at Cartersville, Va.; Richard Randolph at Washington, D.C.; Philip H. Jones at Louisa Court House, Va.; James A. Seddon at Richmond, Va.; and Arthur A. Morson of Morson & Seddon, Richmond attorneys; and William L. King at New York, N.Y.

For 1849, there are several letters from Richard Randolph about the Dabney land claim, with comments about the spoils system and corruption in government. Among business correspondents were Thomas P. Shields, David Anderson, Jr., Lewis Webb, Philip H. Jones, and Frank Ballinger of Kentucky. They mentioned various apects of plantation business and merchandizing. In February 1849, Robert Lewis Dabney and Lavinia Dabney at Fisherville P.O., Augusta County, Va., announced the birth of a son. In May 1849, Charles William Dabney wrote to other family members about a scandal involving his sister Ann's husband.

Items for the years 1850 to 1855 are mostly papers of Charles William Dabney at Hanover County, Va., and Robert Lewis Dabney at Augusta County, Va., including family correspondence; there are chiefly letters from Charles William Dabney to Robert Lewis Dabney, and also business letters to Charles William Dabney and other letters to Robert Lewis Dabney. A claim against the U.S. Government for pay due Charles Dabney from the Revolutionary War was settled. Mention is made of attempts to locate the heirs of Thomas Meriwether. Another child was born to Robert Lewis Dabney and Lavinia Morrison Dabney. There are a few letters from the Morrison family to Robert Lewis Dabney; also from Lavinia Morrison Dabney to him. These letters mention mostly personal and family matters. There are letters from James M. Winston, Thomas P. Shields, Richard Randolph, Philip H. Jones, and others, to the Dabneys, mostly about business matters.

In 1851 letters, Charles William Dabney wrote to Robert Lewis Dabney about politics and his position in the sectional struggle. There are letters from Richard Randolph about the claim of James Meriwether's heirs. A letter dated 14 March 1851, from Charles William Dabney to Robert Lewis Dabney mentions a current Presbyterian church controversy (this is also mentioned in other letters), and also the Central Railroad's plans for his neighborhood. Subsequent letters discussed the advisability and possibility of publishing a pamphlet about ...In a letter dated 11 September 1851, James Morrison wrote to Robert Lewis Dabney about business of the Presbytery; he also wrote about family matters. There is a small broadside about the election in Hanover County, Va., of May 1852, with Charles William Dabney listed as the commonwealth's attorney. In a letter dated 14 November 1852, Charles William Dabney wrote to Robert Lewis Dabney, justifying slavery.

For 1854, there are letters to Robert Lewis Dabney at Hampden Sydney from Benjamin Mosby Smith, mostly at Philadelphia, about Presbyterian matters, and from James Morrison at "Bellevue," Rockbridge County, Va., about religious, personal, and family matters. In a letter dated 16 January 1855, John Samuels Caskie (1821-1869), U.S. House of Representatives, gave information about Texas land, and about the state of politics. In a letter dated 26 February 1855, William L. King wrote to Charles William Dabney about family and personal affairs. Charles William Dabney commented, in a letter dated 1 April 1855, on the tendency of the age towards socialistic schemes for internal improvement. There are letters from James Morrison to Robert Lewis Dabney about church, family, and political matters, including his negative sentiments about Catholicism. A letter dated 25 June 1855 is the first of a series of California letters that continued intermittently to 1875, from Billy Thomas Pate, formerly of Hanover County, Va., at Rabbit Creek, Sierra County, circa Pate described his voyage from New York; several weeks spent in San Francisco; the economic situation; his venture into the mining business, building a hotel and a seed store; his life and work in California; the climate; hazards; the Chinese, Indians, tax-collectors, and other matters. In a note of June 1855, there is mention of the birth of Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) to Robert Lewis Dabney and Lavinia Morrison Dabney; from November 1855, there is news of the death of their son James Dabney. In a letter dated 17 November 1855, Charles H. Shield described the terrible losses in Norfolk, Va., after three months of a yellow fever epidemic.

Papers 1856 are primarily letters and business items of Robert Lewis Dabney and Lavinia Morrison Dabney, and of Charles William Dabney, dealing chiefly with personal, family, religious, and business matters. There are letters dated March and April 1856 from John S. Reese at Baltimore, mostly about a new fertilizer he was experimenting with and selling. In a letter dated 2 June 1856, C[---?] P. Higgason (or Higginson) at the General Land Office, Washington, wrote to Charles W. Dabney chiefly about business matters, with comments on Virginia and national politics.

In a letter dated 3 December 1856, Billy Thomas Pate at San Francisco wrote about politics and the great excitement associated with it; the Vigilance committee's activities, business conditions, and morals. There are also letters from James Morrison as he travelled in the Deep South for his health, mostly about the Presbyterian church and local matters.

There are 1857 letters to Robert Lewis Dabney, Lavinia Morrison Dabney, and Charles William Dabney from: James Morrison, especially in regard to the trouble between he and his congregation, following his absence on account of his health. In a letter dated 18 April 1857, James Morrison provided a full explanation of his view of the controversy. In a letter dated 20 June 1857, Samuel Brown wrote to Robert Lewis Dabney about the same controversy. In a letter dated 8 December 1857, James Morrison at Selma, Ala., commented on the meeting of the Methodist Conference there. In a letter dated 19 March 1857 at San Francisco, Billy Thomas Pate wrote of his large legal practice in connection with land titles and divorces. Charles P. Higgason, at General Land Office, Washington, wrote about Virginia and national politics. St. George Gregg wrote to Charles William Dabney about the latter's political defeat. There are also letters from D[---?] Graham, William L. King, and James G. Mapes. Dated 14 June 1857, there is a letter from Thomas M. Howell at Canandaigua, N.Y., to Charles William Dabney. mostly about politics and sectionalism. There are also additional family letters.

There are numerous 1858 letters to Robert Lewis Dabney, Lavinia Morrison Dabney, and Charles William Dabney. These include items from: Billy Thomas Pate at San Francisco, 4 January 1858, on general conditions in California, the new governor, and land business; 4 April 1858, about a fugitive slave case; 4 July 1858, about new gold at Frazer River taking Californians away; 5 September 1858, mostly about California politics. James Morrison at Selma, Ala., to Lavinia Morrison Dabney and Robert Lewis Dabney; also at Bellevue, Rockbridge County, in July, and at Christianburg in December. C.P. Higginson [there is an inconsistency in the papers as to the spelling of his name] on politics, office-seeking, and land business; 22 March 1858, on matters before the Congress, and a discussion of the Kansas question. Charles William Dabney evidently was evidently seeking appointment as a foreign consul. There are occasional letters from William L. King at New York, chiefly about business matters. J[---?] A. Cowardin at Richmond, 7 July 1858, described Cobbs Island, Accomac County, Va., as a good place for manly men but not suitable for women. There are several letters from Charles William Dabney to Robert Lewis Dabney, mostly about personal and family matters. In a letter dated 27 December 1858, he mentioned plans for a meeting to design a new church.

Letters for the years 1859 and 1860 are mostly to Robert Lewis Dabney, Lavinia Morrison Dabney, and Charles William Dabney from friends and relatives; they discuss family, personal, and political matters. Charles William Dabney resided during this time at "Aldingham," Montpelier, Va.; Robert Lewis Dabney at Hampden-Sydney; James Morrison at Christianburg, Montgomery County, Va.; with occasional sojourns at "Bellevue," Va.

In a letter dated 19 September 1859, Billy Thomas Pate at San Francisco wrote about politics, the duel between judge David S. Terry and senator David Colbreth Broderick (1820-1859), and Pate's own enterprises and political activities. 30 December 1859, E[---?] Littell of the Living Age wrote to Charles William Dabney evidently in answer to Dabney's statement of pro-unionism, commenting on the sectional struggle, blaming it on the politicians, and doubting whether Governor Henry Wise (1806-1876) was "not insane." In a letter dated 13 January 1860, Billy Thomas Pate at Sacremento, circa, then a member of the state legislature, described electing Milton Slocum Latham (1827-1882) to fill the senate vacancy caused by the death of David Colbreth Broderick, with an account of Latham's career. There is a photostat of Charles William Dabney's commission as a captain in the Virginia militia, dated 22 January 1860. There are several letters relating to a possible call to a New York City pulpit for Robert Lewis Dabney. There is also mention of the death of Willie Dabney, son of Charles William Dabney, crushed by a log.

Folder 43

1834-1836 #01412, Subseries: "1.2. 1834-1860." Folder 43

Folder 44

1837-1840 #01412, Subseries: "1.2. 1834-1860." Folder 44

Folder 45

1841-1842 #01412, Subseries: "1.2. 1834-1860." Folder 45

Folder 46

1843-1844 #01412, Subseries: "1.2. 1834-1860." Folder 46

Folder 47

1845-1847 #01412, Subseries: "1.2. 1834-1860." Folder 47

Folder 48

1848 #01412, Subseries: "1.2. 1834-1860." Folder 48

Folder 49

1849 #01412, Subseries: "1.2. 1834-1860." Folder 49

Folder 50

1850 #01412, Subseries: "1.2. 1834-1860." Folder 50

Folder 51

1851-1852 #01412, Subseries: "1.2. 1834-1860." Folder 51

Folder 52

1853-1854 #01412, Subseries: "1.2. 1834-1860." Folder 52

Folder 53

1855 #01412, Subseries: "1.2. 1834-1860." Folder 53

Folder 54

1856 #01412, Subseries: "1.2. 1834-1860." Folder 54

Folder 55

1857 #01412, Subseries: "1.2. 1834-1860." Folder 55

Folder 56

1858 #01412, Subseries: "1.2. 1834-1860." Folder 56

Folder 57

1859-1860 #01412, Subseries: "1.2. 1834-1860." Folder 57

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.3. 1861-1865.

Papers for the Civil War period consist mostly of family letters, discussing the war, personal and family matters, from James Morrison to Lavinia Morrison Dabney and Robert Lewis Dabney; from Charles William Dabney to Robert Lewis Dabney; correspondence between Lavinia Morrison Dabney and Robert Lewis Dabney; business letters to Charles William Dabney from B.F. Watson and B.W. Richardson at Richmond, and from Henry C. Spicer, overseer, at one of Dabney's plantations; also letters, 1864-1865, to Robert Lewis Dabney relating to his manuscript biography of Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson.

1861 items are mostly correspondence between Charles William Dabney, Robert Lewis Dabney, Lavinia Morrison Dabney, and James Morrison, with some military papers. In a letter dated 18 January 1861, Elizabeth ("Betty") Dabney wrote to her brother Robert Lewis Dabney about the household servants, domestic news, and the gloomy state of national affairs. In a letter dated 30 January 1861, James Morrison at Christianburg wrote to Lavinia Morrison Dabney about personal and family matters. In a letter dated 14 February 1861, B. W. Richardson at Richmond, Va., wrote to Charles Dabney about state politics, the safety of an unnamed bridge, and fashions. In a letter dated 14 March 1861, Charles William Dabney wrote to Robert Lewis Dabney about public affairs, divine providence, and the household servants. In a letter dated 23 April 1861, Elizabeth Dabney wrote to Robert Lewis Dabney that Charles William Dabney's company, the "Patrick Henry Riflemen" had been ordered to Richmond; she also mentioned the States Rights Convention in Richmond, and plans for the Dabney family in the event of a lengthy war. In a letter dated 1 May 1861, Charles William Dabney at "Camp of Instruction" [near Richmond] wrote to Robert Lewis Dabney about family matters and mentioned camp life. Dated 6 June 1861, there are special orders to Robert Lewis Dabney, chaplain in the 18th Virginia Volunteer Regiment under Colonel Robert E. Withers, "by order of Maj. Genl. [Robert E.] Lee," signed by Richard Garnett (1817-1863); also special orders (a travel pass) dated 10 June 1861, "by order of B.G. [Pierre Gustave Toutant] Beauregard," signed by Thomas Jordan. There are letters from James Morrison at Christianburg, Va., and "Bellevue," Va., to Lavinia Morrison Dabney at Hampden Sydney, Va., mostly about family matters. In a letter dated 18 June 1861, he wrote that Rutherford Morrison had survived the engagement at Phillippi, [West] Va., unharmed, but had lost all his clothes except those he was wearing; in a letter dated 25 September 1861, he mentioned a visit he made to Monterrey, Highland County, Va., about Rutherford Morrison, Colonel Robert Frederick Baldwin of the 31st Virginia Militia Regiment, and his desire to see his sons educated before he died; in a letter of 18 November 1861 he also mentioned that his son Samuel Morrison had joined the 58th Virginia Infantry Regiment as regimental surgeon; another son, Robert Morrison, had also joined the Confederate Army. There are letters from Lavinia Morrison Dabney at Hampden-Sydney to Robert Lewis Dabney, about her duty, the family, finding a servant for him, gardening, and agricultural work. There are also letters from Robert Lewis Dabney to Lavinia Morrison Dabney at Hampden-Sydney: 1 July 1861, at Fairfax Court House, Va., about the situation in camp, and his health; 20 July 1861 at Manassas, Va., with details of the engagement at Blackburn's Ford on 18 July 1861; 5 September 1861 at Manassas, on his way home having resigned, about the pay of chaplains, and rampant illnesses in the 18th Va. Regt. There are also letters from Charles William Dabney at Aldingham, Montpelier, Va., to Robert Lewis Dabney, with plans to evacuate his family. There are letters from Charles William Dabney in the Virginia Penninsula as a captain in the 15th Va. Vol. Inf. Regt., to Robert Lewis Dabney, serving with the 18th Va. Vol. Inf., mentioning in a letter of 19 July 1861 the latter's friend general Daniel Harvey Hill (1821-1889); in a letter of 24 August 1861, he discussed soldiering and a rumor that general John Bankhead Magruder (1810-1871) had requested a transfer which would leave Daniel Harvey Hill in charge; 20 October 1861, about the kindness of Magruder, his (Dabney's) desire for promotion to the rank of major, and the 15th Va. Regt. being down to 280-300 effectives 3 September and 2 October 1861, Garrett F. Watson at Richmond to Charles William Dabney about the latter's investments, and his business account with Ludlow and Watsen.

1862 items include family correspondence of Robert Lewis Dabney, Lavinia Morrison Dabney, James Morrison and his wife [name unstated], and Charles William Dabney near Yorktown, Va. There are 16 letters from Charles William Dabney to Robert Lewis Dabney, mostly about family matters, the war, and financial arrangements. In a letter dated 22 April 1862, James Morrison at ? to Robert Lewis Dabney at Hampden-Sydney requested the latter to use his influence with general Thomas Jonathan Jackson to secure Rutherford Morrison's transfer from infantry service to Turner Ashby's cavalry, with a mention of Mrs. Jackson. There are several letters, May-June 1862, from Lavinia Morrison Dabney at the Union Theological Seminary to Robert Lewis Dabney serving in the field on Jackson's staff, mostly about personal and family matters, and the effects of the war. In a letter dated 22 May 1862, she mentions the arrival in Farmville, Va., of refugees from Fredericksburg and Richmond. There are several personal letters from James Morrison at ? to Lavinia Morrison Dabney about family matters, and the death of Tommy Dabney.

1863 items include family letters and financial arrangements for the families in war time. There are nine letters from Charles William Dabney at Aldingham, Montpelier, Va., to Robert Lewis Dabney at Hampden-Sydney, Va., mostly about family matters, the war, and business matters. There are letters to Charles William Dabney at Aldingham from Henry C. Spicer, an overseer, and from B.W. Richardson and G.F. Watson, both at Richmond, about business affairs. In a letter dated 23 October 1863, Robert Lewis Dabney wrote to an unknown correspondent about personal news from the Synod.

Items from 1864 include Dabney family correspondence, and letters regarding the manuscript biography of Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson written by Robert Lewis Dabney. (See also Series 3 for additional related materials). In a letter dated 13 February 1864, Robert Lewis Dabney at Henry Court House, Va., wrote to Lavinia Morrison Dabney about details of plantation affairs. Letters dated July 1864 from Lavinia Morrison Dabney to Robert Lewis Dabney mention family and personal matters; Robert Lewis Dabney, in an August letter to Lavinia, described the bad road conditions on his way home. There are many references during this period to Robert Lewis Dabney's work on the life of Jackson. There is a letter, dated 7 April 1864, from William Brown at Richmond to Robert Lewis Dabney about the book. There are also letters from Henry C. Spicer, the overseer, and scattered family letters, with mention of plantation and personal matters. There is correspondence dating from May to August 1864 involving Robert Lewis Dabney as author; this includes exchanges between Robert Lewis Dabney and James Nisbet & Co., publishers, at London, (who were then undertaking an English edition of Dabney's biography of Jackson); and involving Mathew Fontaine Maury (1806-1873), who was then attempting to make the best financial arrangements for Mary Anna Morrison Jackson, but who appears to have confused and delayed the issue; also William Chalmers, editor, at London, who was seeing the manuscript through the press for Nisbet; Dr. [---?] Hoge, who had the manuscript at one time in England; and A. Minis, a Richmond publisher.

Items from 1865 are mostly scattered letters to Robert Lewis Dabney regarding personal and business matters. In a letter dated 16 January 1865, Mary Anna Morrison Jackson at Cottage Home (Va or NC?) wrote to Robert Lewis Dabney at Hampden-Sydney, Va., about her trip to Raleigh, N.C., and, with comments and suggestions, about Dabney's biography of Thomas Jonathan Jackson. Benjamin Mosby Smith at Hampden-Sydney, Va., wrote about the Session, in which he had been asked to supply Robert Lewis Dabney without compensation even while Dabney's salary continued. In a letter dated 14 September 1865, William Smith (1797-1887), ex-Governor, ex-Congressman, and ex-Confederate general, at Warrenton, Va., described the desolation of his home after the war, and his attempts at reconstruction.

Folder 58

1861 #01412, Subseries: "1.3. 1861-1865." Folder 58

Folder 59

1862 #01412, Subseries: "1.3. 1861-1865." Folder 59

Folder 60

1863 #01412, Subseries: "1.3. 1861-1865." Folder 60

Folder 61

1864 #01412, Subseries: "1.3. 1861-1865." Folder 61

Folder 62

1865 #01412, Subseries: "1.3. 1861-1865." Folder 62

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.4. 1866-1903.

This subseries is composed chiefly of letters to Robert Lewis Dabney and Charles William Dabney (fl.1810-1887) about personal matters and post-Civil War social upheaval in the South; also of extensive correspondence between Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) and relatives and friends about education, work, and personal matters.

Letters to Robert Lewis Dabney and Charles William Dabney (fl.1810-1887) from the period 1866-1874 include one from T.M. Howell, at Canandaigua, N.Y., dated 14 January 1866, about not having written in ten years. In a letter dated 2 February 1866, Walter Husted Stevens (1827-1867), former Confederate brigadier-general, in Mexico, wrote about the possibilities of settling there; also about Mathew Fontaine Maury's colonization project and agricultural considerations. In letters dated 27 July and 21 December 1867, William Smith at Warrenton endorsed plans for a school; discussed the need for agricultural chemistry; commented on the agricultural problems of the time; and described land and labor conditions in his neighborhood. In a letter dated 4 July 1869, William Smith at Warrenton discussed current affairs; and in a letter dated 30 June 1874 he discussed agricultural and political matters, and hound pups.

In a letter dated 20 July 1874, Robert Lewis Dabney wrote to William Nelson Pendleton, and Pendleton replied in the margins of the same letter on 25 July 1874, about an 1863 conversation concerning foreign aid to the Confederacy to have been brought about by a pledge of gradual emancipation. In a letter of 15 August 1874, N.R. Darrell at Brooklyn, N.Y., wrote to (probably) Robert Lewis Dabney, advising him against settling on the Island of Jamaicirca

In a letter dated 25 February 1875, Lancaster Ould at Santa Barbara, Calif. (formerly of Baltimore), replied to Charles William Dabney's inquiries about Santa Barbara as a place to settle. In a letter dated 15 April 1875, Charles William Dabney (1855-1945), at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, wrote to his brother Adam Dabney, mostly about the illnesses then prevalent. In a letter dated 2 June 1875, Robert Hall Morrison (1798-1889), at Cottage Home, N.C., wrote to his daughter (unnamed) about his plans to visit Charlotte Walhalla, N.C. There are letters, November 1875 to February 1876, from Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) at Westham Cottage Farm, near Ashland, Va., to his brother George Dabney., mostly about personal matters; a letter dated 31 December 1875 mentions an earthquake that "shook things up first rate about here." In a letter dated 21 November 1875, William Smith at Warrenton wrote to Charles William Dabney (1809-1895) about current state politics and his past record of public service. In a letter dated 27 November 1875, Robert H. Power wrote to Charles William Dabney (1809-1895) about property he should buy in York County, Va. In a letter dated 11 December 1875, Dennis Donohoe of the British Consulate at Baltimore replied to Charles William Dabney (1809-1895) and his inquiries about the possibility of emigration to Jamaica or other British West Indies islands.

There is correspondence written by Robert Lewis Dabney and Lavinia Morrison Dabney during the (apparently) last illness of her mother, Mrs. Frances Morrison at Bellevue, in December 1876.

Items for 1877 include scattered letters from F.C. Shelton and J.W. Watson in Richmond. There is correspondence of Charles William Dabney (1855-1945), and E.E. Wiley, president of Emory and Henry College, and with the Board in regard to an appointment of Dabney as professor of natural sciences and French. There are two letters from sisters Hallie and Em to Lavinia Morrison Dabney, mostly about personal matters.

Items from the period 1880-1885 are mostly numerous letters to Lavinia Morrison Dabney from Robert Lewis Dabney travelling in Europe, and to and from Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) at Gottingen, Germany, and elsewhere, about personal and educational matters. There are letters dated September and October 1880 from L. H. Blanton at Central University, Richmond, Ky., about educational and personal matters. There is a typed description of the North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station, circa 1881, apparently signed by Kemp Battle, "Ex-President U. of N.C." There is a 3-page proposal for an "Elisha Mitchell Science Society" at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with names appended. There is private correspondence dated 1884 concerning the possibility of Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) obtaining a chair at the University of Texas. There is a notice, dated 7 November 1885, of "Mass Meeting in the interests of a State Industrial School," an invitation from The Joint Committee of the City of Raleigh [N.C.] and the Watauga Club, written by Charles William Dabney.

Items for the period 1886-1891 include a copy of a letter dated 8 January 1886 from Robert Lewis Dabney to Daniel Harvey Hill, recollecting some of the events of the Seven Days Battles (June 1862) in Virginia and commenting on Confederate generalship. In a letter dated 25 February 1886, Charles E. Vawter at Crozet, Va., wrote to Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) about the Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical school (typed 6-page letter and resolutions of committee). There are numerous letters from 1886 from James T. Sutton, Jr., at Richmond, Va., to Charles William Dabney (fl.1810-1888) at Hanover Junction, Va., about attempts to collect claims from the U.S. Government in connection with the Revolutionary service of Charles Dabney (1745-1829). There is correspondence from June to August 1887 of James Comfort, O.P. Temple, and others with Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) in regard to Dabney's election as president of the University of Tennessee and director of the Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station. Letters from George R. Dabney in Minnesota to his father in Charles William Dabney (1809-1895) at Hanover County, Va., chiefly about personal and family matters. There are letters from Henry E. Alvord, and other items dating mostly from 1889 to 1891, that concern the Association of American Agricultural Colleges and Experiment Stations.

Items from 1892 to 1902 are chiefly letters to and carbons of letters from Charles William Dabney (1855-1945); subjects discussed are mostly educational, professional, and personal matters. There are letters dated March and April 1893, from M.P. Jarnagin, Charles F. Vanderford, W. H. Jackson and others, to Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) at Knoxville, Tenn., concerning state legislation and the Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station. In letters dated July to September 1893, correspondents J. M. McBryde, Edwin Willits, and others wrote to Charles William Dabney (1855-1945), about a position for Dabney in the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. J.K. Kirkland of Vanderbilt wrote to Dabney about coeducation. Marcus Joseph Wright (1831-1922) wrote to Chales W. Dabney, September 1893, about an article on John Brown. There are more letters concerning the office of Assistant Secretary of Agriculture, including missives from Willits and J. Sterling Morton. In a letter dated 28 December 1893, E. W. Hilgary at Berkeley, California, discussed the relationship between the U.S Dept. of Agriculture and state experiment stations.

There are letters, dated 27 February and 18 May 1894, from M.P. Jarnigin to Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) in which Jarnigan gave legal opinions and comments on Dabney's status as President of the University of Tennessee while taking a leave of absence. There is a letter dated 15 March 1895 from James D. Porter. There are letters and related papers of Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) concerning various national projects: a "U.S. Department of Science," a national university, and a national school of science. Letters from 1898 mention the death of Robert Lewis Dabney. In letters, 1898-1899, J. Sterling Morton and others wrote to Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) about their attempts to capture the presidency of the University of California for Dabney. In a letter dated 10 March 1899, Theodore Roosevelt thanked Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) for his paper entitled "The Colleges and the National Defense." There are letters to Charles William Dabney (1855-1945), dated March to June 1899,from A. Leazer (usually) at Mooresville, N.C., about affairs at the N.C. State Agricultural & Technical College, and personal and family matters.

Folder 63

1866 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 63

Folder 64

1867-1874 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 64

Folder 65

1875-1877 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 65

Folder 66

1878-1879 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 66

Folder 67

1880-1881 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 67

Folder 68

1882-1883 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 68

Folder 69

1884-1885 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 69

Folder 70

1886 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 70

Folder 71

January-15July 1887 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 71

Folder 72

18-30 July 1887 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 72

Folder 73

August-December 1887 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 73

Folder 74

1888-1889 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 74

Folder 75

1890-1891 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 75

Folder 76

1892-May 1893 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 76

Folder 77

July-September 1893 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 77

Folder 78

October-December 1893 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 78

Folder 79

1894 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 79

Folder 80

1895 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 80

Folder 81

January-May 1896 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 81

Folder 82

June-December 1896 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 82

Folder 83

January-May 1897 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 83

Folder 84

June-December 1897 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 84

Folder 85

1898 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 85

Folder 86

January-24 June 1899 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 86

Folder 87

27-28 June 1899 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 87

Folder 88

29 June 1899 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 88

Folder 89

30 June 1899 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 89

Folder 90

1-5 July 1899 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 90

Folder 91

6-15 July 1899 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 91

Folder 92

17-31 July 1899 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 92

Folder 93

August-December 1899 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 93

Folder 94

January-February 1900 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 94

Folder 95

March-December 1900 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 95

Folder 96

1901 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 96

Folder 97

January-March 1902 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 97

Folder 98

April-August 1902 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 98

Folder 99

September-December 1902 #01412, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1903." Folder 99

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.5. 1903-1945.

Items from 1903-1904 are chiefly letters relating to Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) and his acceptance and assumption of the presidency of the University of Cincinnati (Ohio); his inauguration in November 1903; and his contracts and agreements with the Board. Items regarding the choice of his successor at the University of Tennessee, and Dabney's reports to the University Board and the Ohio State Superintendent of Instruction at the end of his first term. Correspondence with men of the Southern Education movement about various phases of the work. Many letters of congratulation and invitations in connection with the new position.

1905

Items for 1905 consist chiefly of: University of Cincinnati matters; invitations to speak; thanks to Dabney for copies of his speeches distributed. There is also correspondence with Robert C. Ogden, Wallace Henry Buttrick (1853-1926), and others concerning affairs of the General Education Board and Southern Education Board. There are also papers relating to educational and political affairs in Kentucky; Dabney's organization of a college association in Kentucky; a meeting at Mammoth Cave in June; and correspondence with M. O. Winfrey, president of Educational Improvement Commission of Kentucky, about educational matters. July- August - Letters for this period concern Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) at London and environs studying educational matters and seeing prominent people. October - There are letters to and from Charles Lee Coon (1868-1927), largely about public education in North Carolina. November - There are letters concerning the death of Charles E. Vawter, Virginia educator and lifelong friend of Charles William Dabney (1855-1945).

1906-1907

For these years, there is correspondence with George J. Ramsey largely about Kentucky educational matters.

1908

Letters for these years mention the death of Lavinia Morrison Dabney. Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) received thanks for his annual report of President of the University of Cincinnati. Dated 11 June 1908, there is a carbon of Charles William Dabney's nine-page letter to Dr. Henry Melville Curtis, giving details of affairs in Cincinnati, and Dabney's troubles with his Board about University matters. There is correspondence with Carnegie Foundation regarding plans for the University of Cincinnati, and additional papers relating to plans for developing Cincinnati as a model great municipally supported university.

1909

For 1909, there are carbon copies of Charles William Dabney's descriptions of his difficulties with the Cincinnati Board of Trustees, addressed to Henry Pritchett of Carnegie Foundation. There is a letter dated 19 April 1909 from George Sherwood Dickerman (1843-1937) concerning the recent Conference of Education in the South.

1910-1911

Items for 1910 include Charles William Dabney's continued reports to Pritchett. In May 1910, Dabney wrote to Walter Hines Page about Theodore H. Price's cotton-picking machine. Other correspondence with Page discusses Page's delivery of a course of lectures at Cincinnati. Items for 1911 include an offer to Dabney of the editorship of Charlotte, N.C., Observer. There is a tribute to Dr. Christian R. Holmes in connection with the new Cincinnati hospital. There are letters dated July 1911 from H. W. Harvey, W. H. Page, and others to Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) about an upheaval in the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

1912

There is correspondence with Mary Cooke Branch Munford, Richmond, Va., on the question of coeducation for the University of Virginia, enclosing leaflets on subject; also items referring to Dabney and Morrison family history. There is private correspondence, dated November and December 1912, between Charles William Dabney and A.J. McKelway, Edward T. Sanford, Thomas W. Jordan, K.G. Matheson, and others, relating to the possibility of Dabney's becoming Secretary of Agriculture under President Woodrow Wilson. They include Dabney's ideas about reorganizing the Department.

1913

Items from 1913 include more letters that discussed the possibility of the Secretaryship of Agriculture for Charles William Dabney. There is correspondence about legislative reference service for the city of Cincinnati and for the state of Ohio, including letters from Charles McCarthy of Wisconsin. There is a letter dated 19 January 1913, G. McM. Ross to C. A. Prosser, criticizing in detail Walter H. Page's "Why Federal Aid for Vocational Education?" In a letter dated 28 January 1913, Charles William Dabney wrote to Walter H. Page, explaining the important work which the University of Cincinnati was engaged in, including reference service for the city and state. In letters dated March 1913, Charles William Dabney recommended various persons for government posts, to President Woodrow Wilson, sending pamphlets.

1914

There is correspondence, dated May to June 1914, between Charles William Dabney and Frank R. Chambers about work of the Southern Education Board, and its absorption into the General Education Board and Conference for Education in the South. There is material relating to a controversy between Charles William Dabney and members of the German population in Cincinnati resulting from Dabney's speech on patriotism given at Columbus, Ohio.

1915

There is more material, dated January and February 1915, relating to Charles William Dabney's controversy with German Americans. Most of the correspondence of this year relates to the organizing of a committee to study conditions in Mexico, with the idea of aiding common education there as a means to restore orderly government, or of doing relief work and founding a university. Dabney's correspondence was with E.L. Doheny, who was financing the project, and with educators, politicians, and Mexican specialists: Theodore H. Price, Charles W. Kent, John B. Moore, Myron T. Herrick, Frank J. Foodnow, Elihu Root, Jacob Gould Schurman, Norman Bridge, Henry C. King, Samuel C. Mitchell, John Bassett Moore, John R. Mott, Arthur W. Page, Leo S. Rowe, David Starr Jordan, Andres Osuna, G. B. Winton, Carleton B. Gibson, and others.

For 1915, there is also Charles William Dabney's correspondence about the international situation, with friends in England--Canon Arthur W. Jephson, William Osler, Walter Hines Page; and Dabney's notes to President Woodrow Wilson, complementing him on his actions. There is information, dated November 1915, from Mrs. R. D. Brown at Meadow View, Va., about Dabney and related family history.

1916

For 1916, there are series of letters from Charles William Dabney to President Woodrow Wilson and to J. P. Tumulty; also correspondence with congressmen and various officials in Washington: about the international situation, the problems connected with the German-American population in Cincinnati; and the sinking of the Lusitania. There are items relating to Woodrow Wilson's visit to Cincinnati on 26 October 1916, when Dabney served on the reception committee. There are letters to Charles William Dabney from his brother Lewis Dabney in Texas, warning against politics, politicians, President Wilson and other "political uplifters". There was also a continuation of correspondence about Mexican education projects, with Charles R. Hudson, Cleveland H. Dodge, Samuel C. Mitchell, J. P. Tumulty, Modesto C. Rolland, Ezequiel A. Chavez, John R. Mott, Robert E. Speer, and others, including plans for establishing an independent college or university in Mexico. Thanks were sent to Dabney for his article "Star of Hope for Mexico," published in The Outlook and Commerce and Finance.

Family letters to Charles William Dabney from brothers Lewis and Samuel Dabney discussed personal and business affairs in Texas. There are minutes of an annual meeting of the George Washington Memorial Association. Beginning in March 1916, there was correspondence between Charles William Dabney and Bolton Smith at Memphis, Tenn., about problems of financing the University of Tennessee Medical College.

1917

There is correspondence dated 1917 between Charles William Dabney and Tasker H. Bliss, Cleveland H. Dodge, Alexander C. Humphreys, Paul Patton Faris, D.L. Crawford, Andres Osuna, G. B. Winton, T. H. Price, and others, educators and publicists, concerning efforts to publicize work of the Mexican educational committee and gain support for a Mexican college. In a letter dated 15 December 1917, T.H. Price began to question Dabney's motives in the Mexican project. There are a series of letters from Lewis M. Dabney, Dallas, discussing economic, war, general, and family matters. There are also copies of 1917 messages from Charles William Dabney to Woodrow Wilson, containing information and compliments. There are miscellaneous items relating to the Board of Visitors of the U.S. Naval Academy, of which Charles William Dabney was a member. Letters dated August to October 1917 from Texas friends discuss contemporary affairs at the University of Texas and Texas politics.

1918

There are 1918 items relating to various wartime services to the government--the American Protective League, War Industries Board, and the Commercial Economy Board of the Council of National Defense. There are Lewis Dabney's comments, dated April 1918, concerning William Joel Stone (1848-1918). In a letter dated 14 December 1918, Charles William Dabney wrote to Senator Lee Slater Overman (1854-1930) about the Germans in Cincinnati.

1919

Items for 1919 include miscellaneous Charles William Dabney personal and family correspondence dealing with University affairs; Naval Academy; and an idea for a tropical university. Letters from Lewis M. Dabney discuss oil speculation, personal and national affairs. There is continued correspondence with Lee Slater Overman about German activities in Cincinnati, and correspondence with Cleveland H. Dodge and Andres Osuna about the Committee on Education in Mexico and the possibility of aiding the Mexican people with sanitation problems. There are also letters to Charles William Dabney about his address and articles on the League of Nations and world peace, which he distributed to prominent people.

1920

There are copies of letters from Charles W. Eliot from 1912 to 1920 about the problems of the University of Cincinnati, to Charles William Dabney. There is correspondence with H. S. Pritchett about Dabney's retirement as president of University of Cincinnati, and Dabney's correspondence with his brothers about Texas investments and lands. There are also letters from friends about Dabney's approaching retirement, and thanks to Dabney for articles, books, and clippings. There is correspondence by telegram, dated October 1920, with George F. Peabody about Dabney's stand on the League of Nations and national politics.

1921-1945

During this period Charles W. Dabney was an active retired scientist, educator and a writer. He lived in New York, Florida, Cincinnati, and Texas. His correspondence, in connection with writing his memoirs, was concerned with the varied interests and activities of his whole life--public education, mineral resources of Texas, N.C., and the United States in general, the institutions and organizations he had been a part of, and persons he had known. His Universal Education in the South was published in 1936. In addition to his own career, these papers are concerned with his continuing interest in mineral resources, his activity in collecting and preserving his family papers and also papers of Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson and Daniel Harvey Hill, his family history and genealogy, the German menace, past and present, the development of a cotton picking machine, and miscellaneous current events and business. His steady correspondents of the later years were J. D. Eggleston, P.P. Claxton, E.P. Moses, W.J. Battle, James D. Hoskins, A.F. Woods, R. Hall Morrison, Parke P. Flournoy, Jr., and R.B. Woodworth. There are many other correspondents who supplied him with their recollections of various phases of his career and the subsequent history of movements and organizations with which he had once been involved.

There are no items for the year 1921, and only one item for the year 1922.

1923-1924

There is a 1923 item relating to the "Committee for the Study of Educational Conditions in Mexico," of which Charles William Dabney was chairman. There are letters from Geological Survey and Senator Morris Sheppard (1875-1941) and others in regard to potash in Texas and the potash bill then before Congress. There is notice of Dabney's resignation as a member of Board of McCormick Theological Seminary.

1925-1927

There was much correspondence for these years about family history and family papers--especially Moore, Morrison, and Brown connections. There was also correspondence with Dr. George J. Ramsey, Arthur W. Jephson, Henry E. Fries, about personal and general matters. Other correspondence related to geological matters--Texas potash, tin in the United States, and included relevant clippings, and letters to and from Eugene A. Smith, state geologist of Alabama. There are items, dated October 1926, relating to the history of the North Carolina Agriculture & Mining College, and an article on Dabney's work in the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in 1893-1896. There is Dabney's summary, dated 1927, of all his contacts with Woodrow Wilson, written for Ray Stannary Baker, 12 pages.

1928

Charles William Dabney at Winter Park, Fla., in the winter; in Europe in the summer; and at Bronxville, N.Y., in the fall, corresponded with Emery Record Preserving Co. of Taunton, Mass., Virginia State Library, and the Virginia Historical Society about the restoration and preservation of family papers.

1929-1931

Charles William Dabney at Chapel Hill, N.C., and Winter Park, Fla., exchanged personal letters relating to papers of Thomas Jonathan Jackson, Daniel Harvey Hill, and Dabney family history. There is a copy of a letter, dated 8 November 1929, from Thomas J. Arnold to Roy Bird Cook, commenting at length on Tate's Jefferson Davis. There are occasional letters from Edward P. Moses about the history of education in North Carolina in the 1880s. Dr. C. W. Stiles wrote to Dabney about Winter Park, Fla., as a place to settle. R.H. Morrison discussed family history. There are copies of letters dated December 1931, of Dabney reviewing certain facts in connection with his work in North Carolina and at Knoxville.

1932-1933

Items for these years include Charles William Dabney's correspondence with various people about phases of the history of education in the South during his lifetime; the career of his uncle, clergyman Benjamin Mosby Smith, and the history of Hampden-Sydney for its celebration, the history of Phi Kappa Phi at the University of Tennessee in connection with Dabney's speech there in 1933. There was also correspondence with Dumas Malone about biographical sketches for the Dictionary of American Biography.

1934-1935

For these years there are items relating to the World's Fair at Chicago; the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; the University of Tennessee (especially letters from James D. Hoskins, and correspondence about naming the chemistry building for Dabney); the death of F.P. Venable in March 1934 and of H. R. McIlwaine in March 1934; and correspondence about the sons of Col. John Thruston Thornton, C.S.A.

1936-1937

Items for these years consists of notices of Universal Education in the South; correspondence about Dabney family history and papers; and dating from June 1937, information concerning Charles William Dabney's honorary degree from the University of Cincinnati.

1938

For 1938, there are items relating to the history of Hampden-Sydney and history of Phi Kappa Phi.

1940

Charles William Dabney's 1940 correspondence concerned people and institutions that had been part of his earlier life. In preparing his memoirs, he wrote to and received letters from: P.P. Claxton, Henry H. Sweets, R.L. Watts, William C. Kerr, Charles E. Ferris, Charles A. Perkins, T. H. Kearney, Bernadotte E. Schmitt, R.M. Chapin, Morse Salisbury, J.G. de Roulhac Hamilton, Dr. J. Garland Sherrill, Burwell K. Marshall, Henry E. Fries, Frederick W. Simonde, E.P. Moses. These letters relate to the University of Tennessee, North Carolina State College, the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, the Association of Agricultural Chemists, the N.C. State Exposition of 1884, Hampden-Sydney and its alumni, the life of Robert Lewis Dabney, and other subjects connected with Charles William Dabney's life. There was also correspondence with Parke Poindexter Flournoy, Jr., and R. B. Woodworth about family history.

1941

Items for this year include more letters relating to material for Charles William Dabney's memoirs, Dabney family history, and current events. Among the correspondents were: Philander P. Claxton, John B. Cox, Josephus Daniels, George Summey, James D. Hoskins, J.P. McCallie, W. T. Crouch, W. J. Battle, Isaac J. Cox, R. B. Woodworth, Charles E. Ferris, Daniel Lawrence, and John E. Hall (principal of Robert Hungerford Vocational School for Negroes at Maitland, Florida). Also J. R. Mohler, Chief of Bureau of Animal Industry of Dept. of Agriculture. There are also letters, dated January and February 1941, between Dabney and the U.S. Dept. of Interior about potash and tin resources for the current national emergency. There are items, dated June 1941, concerning the past and present German menace. There are additional letters relating to the subject of religious education in public schools, especially in Knoxville and Chattanooga, Tenn. Also, there are papers relating to efforts in behalf of the Hampden-Sydney College alumni fund.

1942

There is 1942 correspondence relating to data for Charles William Dabney's memoirs, as above: especially the Cincinnati period of Dabney's life; also concerning the history of the Tennessee Valley Authority and earlier Muscle Shoals studies; also the Summer School of the South and the University of Tennessee; North Carolina biographies; Dabney's interest in mineral resources in North Carolina and Texas; and his interest in the Washington Institute for graduate students in government departments in Washington. In a letter dated 14 March 1942, Dabney described the evolution of the Carnegie Institution of Scientific Research. There are letters to and from A. G. Woods about the development of the graduate school program in the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. There is correspondence, dated December 1942, about International Harvester's new cotton picking machine.

1943-1945

More as in 1942, especially the cotton picking machine and related social and economic problems. Correspondence for Charles William Dabney's memoirs related to the Pinehurst-Aberdeen section of North Carolina, in addition to earlier subjects. From 1943 to 1944, Dabney maintained a steady correspondence with J.D. Eggleston of Hampden-Sydney, who was reading the manuscript of Dabney's memoirs. There is a letter dated 31 October 1944, from Madeline Orr, concerning McCurdy family history. Dabney was at Orlando, Fla., and Cincinnati, Ohio.

Folder 100

January-October 1903 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 100

Folder 101

November-14 December 1903 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 101

Folder 102

15-31 December 1903 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 102

Folder 103

1-10 January 1904 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 103

Folder 104

11-31 January 1904 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 104

Folder 105

February-July 1904 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 105

Folder 106

August-September 1904 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 106

Folder 107

October 1904 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 107

Folder 108

1-15 November 1904 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 108

Folder 109

16 November-December 1904 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 109

Folder 110

January-May 1905 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 110

Folder 111

June-December 1905 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 111

Folder 112

1906-1907 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 112

Folder 113

1908 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 113

Folder 114

January-March 1909 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 114

Folder 115

April-December 1909 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 115

Folder 116

1910 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 116

Folder 117

January-May 1911 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 117

Folder 118

June 1911 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 118

Folder 119

July-December 1911 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 119

Folder 120

1912 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 120

Folder 121

January-May 1913 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 121

Folder 122

June-December 1913 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 122

Folder 123

1914 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 123

Folder 124

January-March 1915 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 124

Folder 125

April 1915 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 125

Folder 126

May-June 1915 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 126

Folder 127

July-December 1915 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 127

Folder 128

January-March 1916 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 128

Folder 129

April-September 1916 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 129

Folder 130

October-December 1916 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 130

Folder 131

January-March 1917 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 131

Folder 132

April-May 1917 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 132

Folder 133

June-18 October 1917 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 133

Folder 134

20 October-December 1917 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 134

Folder 135

January-May 1918 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 135

Folder 136

June-December 1918 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 136

Folder 137

January-May 1919 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 137

Folder 138

June-December 1919 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 138

Folder 139

January-March 1920 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 139

Folder 140

April-May 1920 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 140

Folder 141

June-December 1920 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 141

Folder 142

1922-1925 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 142

Folder 143

1926 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 143

Folder 144

1927 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 144

Folder 145

1928 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 145

Folder 146

1929 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 146

Folder 147

1930 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 147

Folder 148

1931 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 148

Folder 149

1932-1933 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 149

Folder 150

1934-1935 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 150

Folder 151

1936-1937 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 151

Folder 152

1938 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 152

Folder 153

193 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 153

Folder 154

January-February 1940 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 154

Folder 155

March-December 1940 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 155

Folder 156

January 1941 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 156

Folder 157

February 1941 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 157

Folder 158

March-April 1941 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 158

Folder 159

May-June 1941 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 159

Folder 160

July-December 1941 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 160

Folder 161

January-February 1942 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 161

Folder 162

March-April 1942 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 162

Folder 163

May-December 1942 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 163

Folder 164

January-February 1943 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 164

Folder 165

March-April 1943 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 165

Folder 166

May-December 1943 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 166

Folder 167

January-February 1944 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 167

Folder 168

March-May 1944 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 168

Folder 169

June 1944 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 169

Folder 170

July-December 1944 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 170

Folder 171

1945 #01412, Subseries: "1.5. 1903-1945." Folder 171

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.6. Undated.

Included in the subseries is data relating to troubles between Charles William Dabney and his University of Cincinnati board; miscellaneous fragments; sheets from Science on "The Carnegie Institution" by J. McKeen Cattell; and information concerning the George Washington Memorial Association.

Folder 172-174

Folder 172

Folder 173

Folder 174

Undated #01412, Subseries: "1.6. Undated." Folder 172-174

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 2. Additional Dabney Family Letters.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.1. 1872-1941.

This subseries consists of letters deemed by Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) as too personal for inclusion in the general correspondence series. Originally under seal (until May 1969), they are mostly personal letters exchanged between Charles William Dabney and his wife Mary Brent Dabney when one or the other were travelling.

Items from the period 1872 to 1878 consist mostly of Brent and Dabney family letters concerning personal and family matters. 1879 letters were written between Charles William Dabney and Mary Brent before they were married, while both situated themselves in different parts of Europe. Letters of the 1880s to the early 1900s are composed chiefly of letters from Charles William Dabney at Raleigh and Chapel Hill, N.C., Knoxville, Tenn., Washington, D.C., Cincinnati, Ohio, and while on various trips including one to the 1884 Exposition at New Orleans, La., one to St. Louis in 1904, and several trips to Texas over the years; and from Mary Brent Dabney at Elmwood, Rockbridge Baths, and St. Elizabeth's Hospital, N.Y., Battle Creek sanitorium, "Forest Retreat," San Jose (1898), and Lewisburg, W.Va. (1900); there is no indication as to where most of hers were written. In addition to the correspondence between Charles William Dabney and Mary Brent Dabney, there were scattered letters written by Dabney relatives in Texas, Tennessee, and Alabama; letters from the grown Dabney children in the 1900s, ways at college and elsewhere; and scattered family letters in the 1920s and 1930s; there is a letter to Charles William Dabney from a grandchild dated 1941.

Folder 175

1872-1878 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 175

Folder 176

1879 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 176

Folder 177

1880 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 177

Folder 178

January-February 1881 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 178

Folder 179

March 1881 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 179

Folder 180

April 1881 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 180

Folder 181

May-June 1881 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 181

Folder 182

July-December 1881 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 182

Folder 183

May 1882-October 1883 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 183

Folder 184

1884 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 184

Folder 185

February-November 1891 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 185

Folder 186

1887 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 186

Folder 187

1888-1890 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 187

Folder 188

February-November 1891 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 188

Folder 189

December 1891 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 189

Folder 190

1892 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 190

Folder 191

1893 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 191

Folder 192

January-February 1894 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 192

Folder 193

March 1894 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 193

Folder 194

April-May 1894 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 194

Folder 195

June-July 1894 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 195

Folder 196

August 1894 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 196

Folder 197

September-December 1894 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 197

Folder 198

January-March 1895 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 198

Folder 199

April-December 1895 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 199

Folder 200

January-May 1896 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 200

Folder 201

June-October 1896 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 201

Folder 202

November-December 1896 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 202

Folder 203

1897 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 203

Folder 204

January-June 1898 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 204

Folder 205

July 1898 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 205

Folder 206

August 1898 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 206

Folder 207

September 1898 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 207

Folder 208

October-December 1898 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 208

Folder 209

January-July 1899 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 209

Folder 210

August-December 1899 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 210

Folder 211

1900-1902 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 211

Folder 212

1903 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 212

Folder 213

1904 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 213

Folder 214

1905 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 214

Folder 215

1906 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 215

Folder 216

1907 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 216

Folder 217

1908 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 217

Folder 218

1909 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 218

Folder 219

January-June 1910 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 219

Folder 220

July-December 1910 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 220

Folder 221

1911 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 221

Folder 222

1913-1914 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 222

Folder 223

1915 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 223

Folder 224

1916-1917 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 224

Folder 225

1918 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 225

Folder 226

1920-1921 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 226

Folder 227

January-June 1922 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 227

Folder 228

July 1922 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 228

Folder 229

1923-1941 #01412, Subseries: "2.1. 1872-1941." Folder 229

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.2. Undated.

This subseries consists primarily of correspondence between Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) and Mary Brent Dabney, concerning mostly personal and family matters.

Folder 230-237

Folder 230

Folder 231

Folder 232

Folder 233

Folder 234

Folder 235

Folder 236

Folder 237

Undated #01412, Subseries: "2.2. Undated." Folder 230-237

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 3. Stonewall Jackson Research Materials.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.1. Source Materials.

This subseries is comprised chiefly of research materials collected by Robert Lewis Dabney for the writing of his Life and Campaigns of Lt. Genl T. J. Jackson ('Stonewall Jackson'), (1866); many items were photostated under the direction of Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) in the twentieth century and the original documents returned to their prior owners. There are also additional items, photostats and originals, relating to the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia but not Jackson directly. See also Subseries 1.4 and 1.5 for letters to and from Robert Lewis Dabney concerning Jackson and the Confederate Army.

Antebellum material includes a typed transcript of a letter dated 11 May 1854 from Thomas Jonathan Jackson to Gideon Johnson Pillow (1806-1878) in defense of Daniel Harvey Hill's conduct in a Mexican War episode.

Civil War papers include photostats of several letters from Joseph E. Johnston to Jackson, 1861 and 1862, from Robert E. Lee to Jackson, 1861 to May 1863, and from other Confederate officers and officials, in which they discussed chiefly military operations in Virginia.

There are photostats of specifications of charges levelled against William Wing Loring for "neglect of duty;" and of a letter, dated 26 January 1862, from Jackson to Judah P. Benjamin requesting transfer to the Virginia Military Institute or, if that was not granted, acceptance of his resignation. There is a photostat of a letter, dated 3 February 1862, from Joseph E. Johnston at Centreville, Va., to Jackson, urging him not to resign (Johnston's signature was cut out from the original, resulting in some loss of content).

Items dated circa7 February 1862 include an original rough draft of the official report of Jackson's operations in and near the Shenendoah Valley, Va., November 1861 to January 1862, transcribed by a clerk with notes by Jackson and, apparently also by his wife, Anna Morrison Jackson. There is a photostat of another draft of the same report.

There are numerous materials relating to the Battle of Kernstown, Va. (23 March 1862), 23 March to 7 April 1862, including original reports, casualty lists, and photostats.

There is an original letter from Joseph E. Johnston, dated 30 May 1862, to another Confederate general (unspecified), regarding the improper behavior of cavalry pickets from "Wise's Legion." (Johnston was badly wounded 31 May 1862 at the Battle of Seven Pines).

Other materials for 1862 include drafts and photostats of reports concerning the Shenendoah Valley Campaign of 1862; photostats of charges brought against Ambrose Powell Hill (see also undated materials for additional charges); an original letter from Robert E. Lee (probably at Frederickburg, Va.), dated 2 December 1862, to Jackson concerning the Fredericksburg campaign; and an original from Jackson, possibly to Daniel Harvey Hill, also regarding the Fredericksburg campaign.

1863 items include photostats of a report, dated 30 January 1863, of the armaments of the Second Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia, and another, dated 28 February 1863, of its transportation. There is an original letter, dated 30 April 1863, from Robert E. Lee to Jackson, which, according to attached information, was Lee's last letter to Jackson before the Battle of Chancellorsville and his death. There is a photostat of a note, dated 2 May 1863, written by Jackson to Lee, concerning the Battle of Chancellorsville. There are numerous memoranda and notes concerning Jackson's wounding, death, and funeral, including a detailed letter, dated 29 October 1863, from J.G. Morrison near Brandy Station, Va., to Robert Lewis Dabney.

There are numerous letters, dated 1863 to 1865, to Robert Lewis Dabney, with descriptions and reminiscences of Jackson. There are two detailed letters from G.D. Camden, dated 21 and 25 November 1863, concerning Jackson's youth. Other authors of letters to Dabney included James A. Seddon (30 May 1863); Richard S. Ewell (1 October 1863); William H. C. Whiting (30 November 1863); Mary Anna Morrison Jackson; and Thomas T. Munford (31 December 1863). Other items include an original letter from Robert E. Lee to James Longstreet, dated 25 September 1863, regarding the Confederate victory at the Battle of Chickamauga.

Undated items include photostats of charges by Jackson against Ambrose Powell Hill. See also Subseries 3.3 for additional reminiscences of Jackson.

Folder 238

1819-1854 #01412, Subseries: "3.1. Source Materials." Folder 238

Folder 239

April-October 1861 #01412, Subseries: "3.1. Source Materials." Folder 239

Folder 240

November-December 1861 #01412, Subseries: "3.1. Source Materials." Folder 240

Folder 241

January-6 February 1862 #01412, Subseries: "3.1. Source Materials." Folder 241

Folder 242

7 February 1862 #01412, Subseries: "3.1. Source Materials." Folder 242

Folder 243

19-23 March 1862 #01412, Subseries: "3.1. Source Materials." Folder 243

Folder 244

26-28 March 1862 #01412, Subseries: "3.1. Source Materials." Folder 244

Folder 245

April 1862 #01412, Subseries: "3.1. Source Materials." Folder 245

Folder 246

May 1862 #01412, Subseries: "3.1. Source Materials." Folder 246

Folder 247

June 1862 #01412, Subseries: "3.1. Source Materials." Folder 247

Folder 248

August-December 1862 #01412, Subseries: "3.1. Source Materials." Folder 248

Folder 249

January-March 1862 #01412, Subseries: "3.1. Source Materials." Folder 249

Folder 250

April 1863 #01412, Subseries: "3.1. Source Materials." Folder 250

Folder 251

May 1863 #01412, Subseries: "3.1. Source Materials." Folder 251

Folder 252

June-September 1863 #01412, Subseries: "3.1. Source Materials." Folder 252

Folder 253

October-December 1863 #01412, Subseries: "3.1. Source Materials." Folder 253

Folder 254

1864 #01412, Subseries: "3.1. Source Materials." Folder 254

Folder 255

Miscellaneous undated, 1861-1865 #01412, Subseries: "3.1. Source Materials." Folder 255

Folder 256

Materials concerning Ambrose Powell Hill, 1861-1865 #01412, Subseries: "3.1. Source Materials." Folder 256

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.2. Manuscript of Robert Lewis Dabney's Life and Campaigns of Lt. Genl. T. J. Jackson ('Stonewall Jackson').

This subseries is composed entirely of drafts of portions of Robert Lewis Dabney's Life and Campaigns of Lt. Genl. T. J. Jackson ('Stonewall Jackson'), (1866), all in the handwriting of the author.

Folder 257-264

Folder 257

Folder 258

Folder 259

Folder 260

Folder 261

Folder 262

Folder 263

Folder 264

Life and Campaigns of Lt. Genl. T. J. Jackson ('Stonewall Jackson') #01412, Subseries: "3.2. Manuscript of Robert Lewis Dabney's Life and Campaigns of Lt. Genl. T. J. Jackson ('Stonewall Jackson')." Folder 257-264

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.3. Other Loose Materials Relating to Robert Lewis Dabney's Life and Campaigns of Lt. Genl. T. J. Jackson ('Stonewall Jackson').

Items in this subseries are chiefly reminiscences, notes, and clippings collected by Robert Lewis Dabney regarding the life and career of Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson. There are also photostats of Jackson materials made by Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) in the twentieth century. There is a sketch map made by Robert Lewis Dabney of the Battle of Gaines Mill (1862), and a photostat of a photograph of Jackson's Mill (see also Series 7.0 Pictures).

Folder 265

Miscellaneous writings #01412, Subseries: "3.3. Other Loose Materials Relating to Robert Lewis Dabney's Life and Campaigns of Lt. Genl. T. J. Jackson ('Stonewall Jackson')." Folder 265

Folder 266

Copies and extracts #01412, Subseries: "3.3. Other Loose Materials Relating to Robert Lewis Dabney's Life and Campaigns of Lt. Genl. T. J. Jackson ('Stonewall Jackson')." Folder 266

Folder 267

Clippings #01412, Subseries: "3.3. Other Loose Materials Relating to Robert Lewis Dabney's Life and Campaigns of Lt. Genl. T. J. Jackson ('Stonewall Jackson')." Folder 267

Folder 268

Articles, poems #01412, Subseries: "3.3. Other Loose Materials Relating to Robert Lewis Dabney's Life and Campaigns of Lt. Genl. T. J. Jackson ('Stonewall Jackson')." Folder 268

Folder 269

Personal narratives #01412, Subseries: "3.3. Other Loose Materials Relating to Robert Lewis Dabney's Life and Campaigns of Lt. Genl. T. J. Jackson ('Stonewall Jackson')." Folder 269

Folder 270

Maps, pictures #01412, Subseries: "3.3. Other Loose Materials Relating to Robert Lewis Dabney's Life and Campaigns of Lt. Genl. T. J. Jackson ('Stonewall Jackson')." Folder 270

Folder 271

Charles William Dabney's notes on Jackson materials #01412, Subseries: "3.3. Other Loose Materials Relating to Robert Lewis Dabney's Life and Campaigns of Lt. Genl. T. J. Jackson ('Stonewall Jackson')." Folder 271

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 4. Memoirs of Charles William Dabney (Manuscript).

This series is comprised chiefly of typed drafts of the memoirs of Charles William Dabney (1855-1945); many of the pages have marginal and appended notes.

Folder 272-296

Folder 272

Folder 273

Folder 274

Folder 275

Folder 276

Folder 277

Folder 278

Folder 279

Folder 280

Folder 281

Folder 282

Folder 283

Folder 284

Folder 285

Folder 286

Folder 287

Folder 288

Folder 289

Folder 290

Folder 291

Folder 292

Folder 293

Folder 294

Folder 295

Folder 296

Memoirs of Charles William Dabney #01412, Series: "4. Memoirs of Charles William Dabney (Manuscript)." Folder 272-296

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 5. Other Loose Papers.

This series is composed of miscellaneous papers concerning Dabney and related family history; writings (mostly typed) of Charles William Dabney (1855-1945); writings (mostly typed) of interest to Charles William Dabney by different authors; and publications and scrapbook materials collected by Charles William Dabney.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 5.1. Genealogical Data.

This subseries is comprised of genealogical information regarding the Dabney, Morrison, and related families. There are charts, various notes, and essays.

Folder 297

Dabney family chart, 1940. #01412, Subseries: "5.1. Genealogical Data." Folder 297

Folder 298

Dabney family chart, 1941 #01412, Subseries: "5.1. Genealogical Data." Folder 298

Folder 299-304

Folder 299

Folder 300

Folder 301

Folder 302

Folder 303

Folder 304

Other genealogical information #01412, Subseries: "5.1. Genealogical Data." Folder 299-304

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney.

This subseries consists of loose material, mostly typed, authored by Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) between 1877 and 1945, including essays, addresses, and notes concerning education, the First World War, and other matters of interest to Dabney.

Folder 305

"The Crusades" (1877) #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 305

Folder 306

Essay on Edgar Allan Poe #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 306

Folder 307

"The Higher Patriotism" (1914) #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 307

Folder 308

Writings concerning World War One (1914-1918) #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 308

Folder 309

Writings and addresses concerning World War One (1914-1918) #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 309

Folder 310

The German-American Alliance (1914-1917) #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 310

Folder 311

Miscellaneous (1919-1920) #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 311

Folder 312

Agriculture #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 312

Folder 313

Science #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 313

Folder 314

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 314

Folder 315

Mexico #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 315

Folder 316

Mexico #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 316

Folder 317

Rural education #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 317

Folder 318

The "Solid South" and "Renationalization" #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 318

Folder 319

The "Solid South" #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 319

Folder 320

Education in the South #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 320

Folder 321

Education in the South #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 321

Folder 322

Education in the South #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 322

Folder 323

George Washington and Education #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 323

Folder 324

George Washington and Education #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 324

Folder 325

Womens' education #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 325

Folder 326

Medical education #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 326

Folder 327

Medical education #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 327

Folder 328

Medical education #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 328

Folder 329

Medical education #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 329

Folder 330

"Presbyterianism and Popular Government" #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 330

Folder 331

"Religion and Human Progress" #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 331

Folder 332

Founder's Day, the University of South Carolina (11 January 1917) #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 332

Folder 333

Address given at Birmingham, Ala. (n.d.) #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 333

Folder 334-340

Folder 334

Folder 335

Folder 336

Folder 337

Folder 338

Folder 339

Folder 340

Miscellaneous #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 334-340

Folder 341

Phi Kappa Phi #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 341

Folder 342

Miscellaneous fragments #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 342

Folder 343

Published addresses #01412, Subseries: "5.2. Loose Writings of Charles William Dabney." Folder 343

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 5.3. Other Writings (Not by Charles William Dabney).

This subseries includes mostly typed essays about subjects of interest to Charles William Dabney, including the Tennessee Valley Authority. There are typed transcripts of an 1813 letter and 1825 diary fragment written by James M. Glassell, and of an 1819 letter written by William Wirt (1772-1834).

James M. Glassell, U.S. Army officer, wrote in a letter (typed transcript, 6 pp.) to an uncle, dated 22 July 1813, at Fort George, N.Y., about 1813 fighting between American forces under General Henry Dearborn (1751-1829) and the opposing British and Indian forces along the Canadian border. There is a 7-page typed transcript of portions of a diary written in September and December 1825 by Glassell concerning his travels in England and France. There are descriptions of the Doncaster horse races in England, pickpockets, and the "English ladies and lasses..."; and of travel in France, particularly of a visit with the Marquis de Lafayette (1757-1834) and family, who was also entertaining George Washington and his family.

There is a 4-page typed transcript of a letter, dated 25 October 1819, from William Wirt at Washington, D.C., to "Mr. Coalter" at Richmond[?], Va., referring to events in and U.S. Government policy towards Spanish Florida; the Seminole Indians; and Andrew Jackson.

Folder 344

Typed transcripts, 1813, 1819, 1825 #01412, Subseries: "5.3. Other Writings (Not by Charles William Dabney)." Folder 344

Folder 345-347

Folder 345

Folder 346

Folder 347

Miscellanous writings #01412, Subseries: "5.3. Other Writings (Not by Charles William Dabney)." Folder 345-347

Folder 348

Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) #01412, Subseries: "5.3. Other Writings (Not by Charles William Dabney)." Folder 348

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 5.4. Other Loose Materials.

This subseries includes an assortment of materials collected by Charles William Dabney. There are publications and clippings from various corporate bodies he was associated with, including Hampden-Sydney College; the University of Tennessee; the University of Cincinnati; and the U.S. Government. There are educational publications and articles; government documents and materials; business and manufacturing papers; agricultural and veterinary publications; science and health materials; 1941-1942 publications of the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity; and religious materials. The bulk of this subseries is made up of loose newspaper clippings, many concerning Charles William Dabney and his acquaintances, and some apparently used by Dabney while writing his memoirs.

Folder 349-350

Folder 349

Folder 350

Hampden-Sydney College Alumni Association #01412, Subseries: "5.4. Other Loose Materials." Folder 349-350

Folder 351

Hampden-Sydney College #01412, Subseries: "5.4. Other Loose Materials." Folder 351

Folder 352

University of Tennessee publications, 1893-1902 #01412, Subseries: "5.4. Other Loose Materials." Folder 352

Folder 353

University of Tennessee publications, 1903-1904 #01412, Subseries: "5.4. Other Loose Materials." Folder 353

Folder 354

University of Tennessee miscellaneous materials (various dates) #01412, Subseries: "5.4. Other Loose Materials." Folder 354

Folder 355

University of Cincinnati miscellaneous materials (various dates) #01412, Subseries: "5.4. Other Loose Materials." Folder 355

Folder 356

Educational publications and articles #01412, Subseries: "5.4. Other Loose Materials." Folder 356

Folder 357

(various dates) #01412, Subseries: "5.4. Other Loose Materials." Folder 357

Folder 358

Business and manufacturing publications (1900-1945) #01412, Subseries: "5.4. Other Loose Materials." Folder 358

Folder 359

Agricultural and veterinary publications (1901-1945) #01412, Subseries: "5.4. Other Loose Materials." Folder 359

Folder 360

Science and health publications (1901-1944) #01412, Subseries: "5.4. Other Loose Materials." Folder 360

Folder 361

Phi Gamma Delta publications (1941-1942) #01412, Subseries: "5.4. Other Loose Materials." Folder 361

Folder 362

Articles and publications (miscellaneous) #01412, Subseries: "5.4. Other Loose Materials." Folder 362

Folder 363

Religious publications #01412, Subseries: "5.4. Other Loose Materials." Folder 363

Folder 364-400

Folder 364

Folder 365

Folder 366

Folder 367

Folder 368

Folder 369

Folder 370

Folder 371

Folder 372

Folder 373

Folder 374

Folder 375

Folder 376

Folder 377

Folder 378

Folder 379

Folder 380

Folder 381

Folder 382

Folder 383

Folder 384

Folder 385

Folder 386

Folder 387

Folder 388

Folder 389

Folder 390

Folder 391

Folder 392

Folder 393

Folder 394

Folder 395

Folder 396

Folder 397

Folder 398

Folder 399

Folder 400

Scrapbook material #01412, Subseries: "5.4. Other Loose Materials." Folder 364-400

Folder 401

Materials about Robert E. Lee #01412, Subseries: "5.4. Other Loose Materials." Folder 401

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 6. Volumes.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 6.1. 1744-1801.

This subseries consists of account books, ledgers, daybooks, memoranda, and miscellaneous notes by William Dabney and Charles Dabney kept at various Virginia locations.

Folder 402

Vol. 1. Account book, 1744-1745, William Dabney, (8 pp.). Chiefly an account of necessaries delivered to the poor of St. Martin's Parish, Va., during William Dabney's wardship. #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 402

Folder 403

Vol. 2. Account book, 1745-1756, William Dabney, (32 pp.). Chiefly accounts of profits and charges of the estate of William Morris, deceased; also annual lists of tobacco crops. #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 403

Folder 404

Vol. 3. Account book, 1760-1765, estate of Dudley Digges at Louisa County, Va., (32 pp.). Consists of accounts of overseers, slave lists, and lists of share crops and supplies. #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 404

Folder 405

Vol. 4. Account book, 1760-1765, estate of Edward Ambler, Hanover and Louisa counties, Va. (54 pp.). #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 405

Folder 406

Vol. 5. Account book, 1767-1777, Charles Dabney at Hanover County, Va., (47 pp.). Accounts with Edward Ambler and his estate. #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 406

Folder 407

Vol. 6. Account book, circa 1767, Charles Dabney at Hanover County, Va., ( pp.). Accounts with Edward Ambler. #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 407

Folder 408

Vol. 7. Account book, 1766-1769, Charles Dabney at Hanover County, Va., (29 p.). Accounts with Edward Ambler's slaves, including share crops. #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 408

Folder 409

Vol. 8. Account book, 1770-1777, Charles Dabney at Hanover County, Va., (44 pp.). Accounts with sharecroppers at the estate of Edward Ambler. #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 409

Folder 410

Vol. 9. Slave, livestock and crop lists, 1772-1776, 1782-1784, 1789, estate of Edward Ambler, (17 pp.). #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 410

Folder 411

Vol. 10. Account book, 1776-1777, Charles Dabney at various Virginia locations, (25 pp.). Miscellaneous accounts; also lyric poetry about general Richard Montgomery (1738-1775) and his 1775 expedition to Canada, and quotations from Voltaire's "Age of Lewis [sic] XIV." #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 411

Folder 412

Vol. 11. Account book, 1777-1791, Charles Dabney, (32 pp.). Also contains written music and a list of commissioned officers of the 2nd Virginia State Regiment and their counties of origin, circa 1779. #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 412

Folder 413

Vol. 12. Daybook, 1783-1787, Charles Dabney at Hanover County, Va., (44 pp.). Also contains a list of military certificates (p. 15). #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 413

Folder 414

Vol. 13. Daybook, 1784, (48 pp.). #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 414

Folder 415

Vol. 14. Daybook, 1785-1790, (248 pp.). #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 415

Folder 416

Vol. 15. Memorandum book, 1788-1791, (45 pp.). #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 416

Folder 417

Vol. 16. Ledger, 1789-1792, Charles Dabney at Hanover County, Va., (192 pp.). Contains an incomplete account of militia mobilization in 1775, mentioning Patrick Henry (pp. 187-188). #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 417

Folder 418

Vol. 17. Daybook, 1791, (38 pp.). #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 418

Folder 419

Vol. 18. Daybook, 1792-1793, (68 pp.). #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 419

Folder 420

Vol. 19. Daybook, 1795-1797, (105 pp.). #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 420

Folder 421

Vol. 20. Daybook, 1797-1802, (68 pp.). #01412, Subseries: "6.1. 1744-1801." Folder 421

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 6.2. 1817-1850.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 6.3. 1878-1945 and Undated.

This subseries consists of volumes used by Charles William Dabney (1855-1945), including a scrapbook, pocket diaries, address books, notebooks, and an academic progress book (1878-1880) from Germany.

Folder 426

Vol. 25. Scrapbook, 1893-1897, (100 pp.), Charles William Dabney (1855-1945), as Assistant Secretary of Agriculture, of clippings concerning a proposed "National Dept. of Science." The scrapbook is a "Mark Twain's Scrap Book," (N.Y.: Daniel Slate & Company, Patented 1873). #01412, Subseries: "6.3. 1878-1945 and Undated." Folder 426

Folder 427

Vol. 26 Pocket diary, 1900, (224 pp.), Charles William Dabney (1855-1945), while President of the University of Tennessee, at Knoxville. Contains scattered notations regarding travel, classes, and accounts; also includes addresses. #01412, Subseries: "6.3. 1878-1945 and Undated." Folder 427

Folder 428

Vol. 27. Pocket diary, 1902, (120 pp., 3 encl.), Charles William Dabney (1855-1945), brief entries with notes, memoranda, accounts, and addresses. #01412, Subseries: "6.3. 1878-1945 and Undated." Folder 428

Folder 429

Vol. 28. Pocket diary, 1940, (112 pp.), Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) at Winter Park, Fla. Brief entries. #01412, Subseries: "6.3. 1878-1945 and Undated." Folder 429

Folder 430

Vol. 29. Notebook, circa 1880s, (240 pp.), Charles William Dabney (1855-1945), of physics, chemistry, and other scientific notes. #01412, Subseries: "6.3. 1878-1945 and Undated." Folder 430

Folder 431

Vol. 30. Notebook, undated, (120 pp., encl.), Charles William Dabney (1855-1945), at Knoxville, Tenn., and Winter Park, Fla., of anecdotes, quotations, and jokes (many with racist overtones). #01412, Subseries: "6.3. 1878-1945 and Undated." Folder 431

Folder 432

Vol. 31. Address book, undated, (104 pp.), Charles William Dabney (1855-1945), at Winter Park, Fla. #01412, Subseries: "6.3. 1878-1945 and Undated." Folder 432

Folder 433

Vol. 32. Address book, undated, (59 pp.), Charles William Dabney (1855-1945). #01412, Subseries: "6.3. 1878-1945 and Undated." Folder 433

Folder 434

Vol. 33. Grade book, 1878-1880, (11 pp.), Charles William Dabney (1855-1945), Gottingen (?), Germany, with notations by German professors. #01412, Subseries: "6.3. 1878-1945 and Undated." Folder 434

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 7. Pictures.

Image P-1412/1

Leaf from printed publication, portrait of Charles Dabney (1855-1945) as President of the University of Cincinnati (1904-1920). #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/1

Image P-1412/2

Leaf, portrait of Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) undated. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/2

Image P-1412/3

Photograph of Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) as President of the University of Cincinnati (1904-1920). (Negative on file). #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/3

Image P-1412/4

Oval-shaped photograph of Charles William Dabney (1855-1945) with unidentified people, three women and two men, seated in a classroom, undated, but probably before 1904. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/4

Image P-1412/5

Photograph of Robert Lewis Dabney (1820-1898), undated. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/5

Image P-1412/6

Cabinet card photograph portrait of Lavinia Morrison Dabney, "while in Texas" (after 1865). #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/6

Image P-1412/7

Carte-de-Visite, Thomas Young Brent (1835-1863), circa 1861, in civilian clothes. "On reverse: Hoag & Quick's Art Palace, Cincinnati, Ohio." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/7

Image P-1412/8

Mounted photograph of Thomas Young Brent in Confederate Army officer's uniform. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/8

Image P-1412/9

Photograph of Elizabeth Dabney, "daughter of Judge Robt. L. Dabney of Hervado, Miss." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/9

Image P-1412/10

Engraving of Charles William Dabney at Aldingham, Va. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/10

Image P-1412/11

Engraving of Cordelia E. Dabney. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/11

Image P-1412/12

Engraving of John Watkins. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/12

Image P-1412/13

Engraving of Judith Watkins. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/13

Image P-1412/14

Leaf, photograph of Robert Lewis Dabney, post-1865. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/14

Image P-1412/15

Leaf, photograph of Charles Wardell Stiler, reprinted from the Annals of Medicine and Parasitology 26:1 (March 19, 1932). #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/15

Image P-1412/16-P-1412/24

Prints of P-1412/6, 10, 11, and items found elsewhere in the collection. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/16-P-1412/24

Image P-1412/25

Photograph of "Dr. J. Harvey Kellog & Former Assoc. Secy. of AG. Dr. [Charles William] Dabney, 1935." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/25

Image P-1412/26-P-1412/28

Photograph of Charles William Dabney (1855-1945), retired, and unidentified man. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/26-P-1412/28

Image P-1412/29-P-1412/30

Photographs of Charles William Dabney, retired, and two unidentified men. Thompson's Photography, Knoxville, Tenn. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/29-P-1412/30

Image P-1412/31

Photograph of Charles William Dabney, retired, and two men. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/31

Image P-1412/32

Group photograph of Charles William Dabney and friends, June 1941. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/32

Image P-1412/33

Photograph (in poor condition) of Bradley T. Johnson portrait painting of Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson. "Published by D.W. Glass & Co.," Baltimore, Md. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/33

Image P-1412/34

Photostat of photograph, "Lt. Gen'l T. J. Jackson & Staff," including Robert Lewis Dabney. "Cook Photo." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/34

Image P-1412/35

Photograph of "Jackson's Mill, on West Fork of Monongahela River, Lewis County, West Virginia." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/35

Image P-1412/36

Photograph of "the old Jackson Mill, erected in 1837 and the home of Cummins Jackson, erected about 1843 and burned in 1915...Photo by Sam Barret, Weston, 1889." "Roy Bird Cook--1930." (Information attached). #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/36

Image P-1412/37

Close-up from group portrait, print of Robert Doak Lilley (1836-1886). #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/37

Image P-1412/38

General Robert E. Lee and others at White Sulphur Springs, Va.: James Connor; John Geary; John Bankhead Magruder; Robert Doak Lilley; Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard; Lew Wallace; Henry Wise; Joseph L. Brent; Blaque Bey; George Peabody; W.W. Corcoran; and James Lyons. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/38

Image P-1412/39

Print, apparently of P-1412/38, cropped and retouched. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/39

Image P-1412/40

Photostat of P-1412/38, from Miller's Photographic History of the Civil War, v.1, p.4. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/40

Image P-1412/41

Cabinet card photograph of "Mrs. Crute" of Buckingham County, Va., a friend of Charles William Dabney (1855-1945). Foster, Cambell & Co. Richmond, Va. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/41

Image P-1412/42

Photograph, mounted, of Dabney Kerr, son of William C. Kerr, December 1909. Backrack & Bro., Baltimore, Md. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/42

Image P-1412/43

Photograph of Charles Dabney Thomson at cottage in New York (as a baby). #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/43

Image P-1412/44

Photograph, mounted, of Charles Dabney Thomson (as an adult). #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/44

Image P-1412/45

Photograph, mounted, of "M. Dorest." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/45

Image P-1412/46

Photograph, mounted, of "C. Alphonson Smith." B.F. Johnson, Washington, D.C. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/46

Image P-1412/47

Photograph, mounted, of "Julius D. Dreher[?]" taken on his 81st birthday, 28 October 1926, at Clearwater, Fla. Taken by John Atren, Clearwater, Fla. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/47

Image P-1412/48

"Miss Miriamme J. Houston, Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. Frederick Houston at the New York Times Studios. William E. Coutts, Ltd., Toronto, Canada." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/48

Image P-1412/49

Carte-de-Visite: "My young friend, the Count von [?], as a Fuchs of the Hanoverian Corps at Gottingen in 1878-1879, who introduced me to the Corps, whose members were so courteous to me. C[harles] W[illiam] D[abney]." Berna. Petri, Gottingen. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/49

Image P-1412/50

Carte-de-Visite of Dr. Karl Klevn[?]. Gebr. Noelle, Gottingen. "Lith., Anst. v. J. Knuevangel, Hannover." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/50

Image P-1412/51

Photograph of Elizabeth Eggleston. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/51

Image P-1412/52

Photograph of Leonard Wood. Copyright, Walinger, Chicago. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/52

Image P-1412/53

Print, photograph of Mariam H. Bell Fairchild and David Fairchild "looking down on the rice terraces," Luzon, Phillipines, 9 December 1939, "taken by M. Pamesis, the Chief Forestor of the Phillipine Islands." Information on reverse of picture. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/53

Image P-1412/54-P-1412/55

Prints of portrait painting of John Marshall (1755-1835), "courtesy of the Chamber of Congress of Richmond, Va." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/54-P-1412/55

Image P-1412/56

Photograph of Julian Harvey Kellogg, 1893. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/56

Image P-1412/57

Photograph of "A. Woods, May 1943." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/57

Image P-1412/58

See 31. Harris & Ewing, Washington, D.C. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/58

Image P-1412/59

Photograph of Martha Berry, at The Berry Schools, Mount Berry, Ga., undated. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/59

Image P-1412/60

Photograph of "Hon. Robert C. Ogden." (negative on file). #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/60

Image P-1412/61

Group photograph, mounted, of the First Convention of Agricultural Colleges and Experiment Stations, July 8, 1885. There is an accompanying key with names and places, apparently made by Charles William Dabney (1855-1945). #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/61

Image P-1412/62

Print, President Grover Cleveland and his cabinet, April or May 1885: Daniel S. Lamont; Hoke Smith; Walter Q. Gresham; William L. Wilson; Hilary A. Herbert; John G. Carlisle; Julius Sterling Morton; and Richard Olney. Photo c1895 by G. Prince. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/62

Image P-1412/63-P-1412/71

Snapshots of people at educational ceremonies, circa 1930s. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/63-P-1412/71

Image P-1412/63

Joseph Lincoln[?]. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/63

Image P-1412/64

"Dr. Stocking." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/64

Image P-1412/65

"Dr. Stocking speaking & Sec. [Cordell] Hull." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/65

Image P-1412/66

David Grayson[?]. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/66

Image P-1412/67

"Mrs. John Martin." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/67

Image P-1412/68

Winslow S. Anderson, Dean, Rollins College. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/68

Image P-1412/69

Irving Bachellor. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/69

Image P-1412/70

"Prof. Peabody." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/70

Image P-1412/71

"Mrs. Holt & Rabbi Wise." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/71

Image P-1412/72-P-1412/75

Snapshots from envelope labelled "Friends of Walter True of Animated Mag.", circa 1930s. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/72-P-1412/75

Image P-1412/72

"S.T. Stocking, Mrs. Holt, Joe Lincoln, Mrs. Seveland[?]." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/72

Image P-1412/73

"Dr. Campbell & Rabbi Wise." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/73

Image P-1412/74

Ray Stannard Baker. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/74

Image P-1412/75

"The blind astronomer and his wife." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/75

Image P-1412/76-P-1412/91

Snapshots, mostly of people, circa 1930s. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/76-P-1412/91

Image P-1412/76

"Winston Churchill the Am[erican]." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/76

Image P-1412/77

"Mrs. [Marjorie Kinnan] Rawlings [(1896-1953)], author, The Yearling [1938]." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/77

Image P-1412/78

Crutes House at Buckingham, Va. Keystone Photo Serice, 19 July 1935. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/78

Image P-1412/79

"Secy. [Cordell] Hull with handicapped Mrs. Rawlings." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/79

Image P-1412/80

"Pres. Holt, Rollins College, Winter Park, Fla." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/80

Image P-1412/81

"Mrs. Totsluch[?], Mrs. Thomsen, wife of the supt. of 'Old tenters.'" #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/81

Image P-1412/82

"Prest. Tigert of Univ. Fla." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/82

Image P-1412/83

Norma Tuttle in nurse's uniform. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/83

Image P-1412/84

Albert Shaw and Winston Churchill (the American). #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/84

Image P-1412/85

"Prof. Grover of Rollins." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/85

Image P-1412/86

Irving Bacheller. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/86

Image P-1412/87

"Secy [Cordell] Hull, Rabbi Wise." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/87

Image P-1412/88

John Martin. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/88

Image P-1412/89

"Irving Bachellar, Shaw, Baker." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/89

Image P-1412/90

"Mr. & Mrs. Martin's Res." House with man standing in front, residential area. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/90

Image P-1412/91

"Dr. Stocking" with cigar. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/91

Image P-1412/91-P-1412/110

Scenes, mostly snaphots, of places associated with Dabney family history. Several bear a stamp on their reverse side reading "People's Drug Stores, Sep. 2, 1936." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/91-P-1412/110

Image P-1412/92

"Aldingham house built by Wil. Dabney & owned by Charles of Rev., Charl., Jr., his nephew, & uncle C.W." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/92

Image P-1412/93

"The little old house of Saml Dabney & his daughter Elizabeth, who taught school their." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/93

Image P-1412/94

"One end of house at Aldingham..." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/94

Image P-1412/95

"Old 'Dabney Well' near Pamunkey in King William Co. Va." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/95

Image P-1412/96

"Tablet in the wall of the cemetery back of the old house..." Includes names and vital dates of several Dabney family members up to 1890. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/96

Image P-1412/97

"Price Place, Barbara Winston." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/97

Image P-1412/98

people standing in well house, beside trunk of large tree, a 1930s car in the background. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/98

Image P-1412/99-P-1412/106

Other views. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/99-P-1412/106

Image P-1412/107

Front porch and portico of house. Keystone Photo Service, 19 July 1935. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/107

Image P-1412/108

Schoolhouse, Buckingham, Va. Keystone Photo Service, 19 July 1935. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/108

Image P-1412/109

"Marker to brigade with name of Col. Charles Dabney at Valley Forge, Pa." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/109

Image P-1412/110

Another view of P-1412/109. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/110

Image P-1412/111-P-1412/118

Postcards, circa 1920s-1930s, of places related to Dabney family history, mostly of South Petherton, England, "where Daubeny [old spelling of Dabney] tomb is located." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/111-P-1412/118

Image P-1412/111

Cushing Hall, Hampden-Sydney College, Farmville, Va. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/111

Image P-1412/112

South Petherton, England. "Aerial View by Surrey Flying Services, Croydon." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/112

Image P-1412/113

South Petherton. Cross & Thornton, Photos., Wincanton. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/113

Image P-1412/114

"King Ina's Palace," South Petherton. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/114

Image P-1412/115

Church, cemetery, and dog. South Petherton. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/115

Image P-1412/116

South Petherton. Photographed and published by R. Wilkinson & Co., Towbridge. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/116

Image P-1412/117

South Petherton. R. Wilkinson & Co., Towbridge. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/117

Image P-1412/118

Interior of church. South Petherton. Cross & Thorton, Photos., Wincanton. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/118

Image P-1412/119

Photograph of home of Robert Lewis Dabney and Lavinia Morrison Dabney at Victoria, Tex. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/119

Image P-1412/120-P-1412/123

International Harvester Co. "Cotton Picker Series" photographs, with captions attached. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/120-P-1412/123

Image P-1412/120

Black agricultural workers (men) using a "McCormick-Deering Cotton-Picker" to pick cotton. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/120

Image P-1412/121

White agricultural workers (men) riding a "Price-Campbell Cotton Picker." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/121

Image P-1412/122

"Int'l Harvester cotton picker's in operation...in a cotton field in the Miss. delta region..." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/122

Image P-1412/123

A black agricultural worker (man) operating the "latest model" of cotton picker. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/123

Image P-1412/124

Photograph, mounted, of a memorial tablet inscribed "In Memory of Worth Bagley, Ensign, United States Navy, the first American officer killed in the Spanish-American War...May 11, 1898." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/124

Image P-1412/125

Photograph, mounted, of memorial tablet dedicated "To the Glory of God and in memory of Jefferson Davis..." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/125

Image P-1412/126-P-1412/138

Photographs of unidentified people. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/126-P-1412/138

Image P-1412/126-A

Man with coat and hat; brick dwelling in background. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/126-A

Image P-1412/126-B

Man with coat standing in front of a biplane, circa 1928. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/126-B

Image P-1412/127

Four elderly people--two men and two women--including a nurse. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/127

Image P-1412/128

Man, probably Robert Lewis Dabney before the Civil War. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/128

Image P-1412/129

Woman, probably Lavinia Morrison Dabney before the Civil War. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/129

Image P-1412/130

Woman, probably Lavinia Morrison Dabney after the Civil War. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/130

Image P-1412/131

Unidentified woman. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/131

Image P-1412/132

Unidentified woman. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/132

Image P-1412/133

Print, portrait of a man, 19th century. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/133

Image P-1412/134

Print, portrait of a woman, 18th century. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/134

Image P-1412/135

Man in a white coat, 20th century, gripping a microscope in his left hand and a pencil in his right hand. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/135

Image P-1412/136

Four people--two men and two women, 20th century. (One man in white U.S. Navy uniform). #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/136

Image P-1412/137

Man in suit and tie, 20th century. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/137

Image P-1412/138

Two girls seated at a table outside a house, a black cook or servant standing. circa 1915-1929. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/138

Image P-1412/139-P-1412/179

Snapshots, unidentified travel scenes, including sites in Egypt, Turkey, and Greece. Undated. #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/139-P-1412/179

Image P-1412/180-P-1412/181

Leaves, post-1920, photograph of "Barrington Court," England, "work in progress." #01412, Series: "7. Pictures." P-1412/180-P-1412/181

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse ADDITIONS AFTER 1991. Addition of November 1992 (Acc. 92164) 1796-1936 and undated

Box 37

1796-1901 #01412, Series: "ADDITIONS AFTER 1991. Addition of November 1992 (Acc. 92164) 1796-1936 and undated" Box 37

Box 38

January-September 1902 #01412, Series: "ADDITIONS AFTER 1991. Addition of November 1992 (Acc. 92164) 1796-1936 and undated" Box 38

Box 39

October 1902-June 1903 #01412, Series: "ADDITIONS AFTER 1991. Addition of November 1992 (Acc. 92164) 1796-1936 and undated" Box 39

Box 40

July 1903-March 1904 #01412, Series: "ADDITIONS AFTER 1991. Addition of November 1992 (Acc. 92164) 1796-1936 and undated" Box 40

Box 41

April 1904-April 1906 #01412, Series: "ADDITIONS AFTER 1991. Addition of November 1992 (Acc. 92164) 1796-1936 and undated" Box 41

Box 42

May 1906-December 1911 #01412, Series: "ADDITIONS AFTER 1991. Addition of November 1992 (Acc. 92164) 1796-1936 and undated" Box 42

Box 43

1912-1922 #01412, Series: "ADDITIONS AFTER 1991. Addition of November 1992 (Acc. 92164) 1796-1936 and undated" Box 43

Box 44

1923-1929 #01412, Series: "ADDITIONS AFTER 1991. Addition of November 1992 (Acc. 92164) 1796-1936 and undated" Box 44

Box 45

January 1930-October 1931 #01412, Series: "ADDITIONS AFTER 1991. Addition of November 1992 (Acc. 92164) 1796-1936 and undated" Box 45

Box 46

November 1931-December 1932 #01412, Series: "ADDITIONS AFTER 1991. Addition of November 1992 (Acc. 92164) 1796-1936 and undated" Box 46

Box 47

1933-1936; undated #01412, Series: "ADDITIONS AFTER 1991. Addition of November 1992 (Acc. 92164) 1796-1936 and undated" Box 47

Box 48-50

Box 48

Box 49

Box 50

Undated #01412, Series: "ADDITIONS AFTER 1991. Addition of November 1992 (Acc. 92164) 1796-1936 and undated" Box 48-50

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Items Separated

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Processing Information

Processed by: B. Allan, 1953-1956, 1960; Erik D. France, February 1991 and subsequent additions

Encoded by: ByteManagers Inc., 2008

Subseries 5.4 (Scrapbook Materials) not fully processed.

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