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Collection Number: 02606

Collection Title: Charles Iverson Graves Papers, 1831-1962

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the section for more information.


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Size 3.0 feet of linear shelf space (approximately 1500 items)
Abstract Charles Iverson Graves of Newton and Floyd counties, Ga., and Caswell County, N.C., attended the U.S. Naval Academy; served as a U.S. and Confederate naval officer; taught school and operated a farm near Rome, Ga.; spent 1875-1878 in Egypt as an officer in the Egyptian army; and worked as a civil engineer on construction of the Georgia Pacific and Memphis & Vicksburg railroads, 1881-1884. Charles and his wife, Margaret (Lea) Graves (fl. 1860-1898), had five children: Charles Iverson, Jr., William Lea, Mary Hinton, Robert William, and Anne Parke. The collection is chiefly correspondence of Charles Iverson and Margaret (Lea) Graves, especially documenting his military career in the U.S. and Confederate navies and his civil engineering career, particularly his service in Egypt, but also his work on the Georgia Pacific and Memphis & Vicksburg railroads. The pair exchanged several hundred letters from 1875 to 1878 detailing his experiences in Egypt and her life at Locust Hill, Caswell County, N.C., where she tried to raise five children with limited economic resources. There is also correspondence relating to Charles's time at the U.S. Naval Academy; to the couple's courtship; to the couples' independent struggles--he on active duty and she on the the homefront at various places, including Mobile, Ala.--during the Civil War; and to the operation of the family farm in Rome, Ga. Other letters contain information about the experiences of other family members, particularly members of the Lea family, who moved to Alabama and Mississippi before the Civil War, and those of a relative in California after the war. Also included are genealogical materials about the Graves, Lea, and related families, reminiscences by Margaret (Lea) Graves, and Charles Iverson Graves's writings on Egyptian culture. There are also other writings, notes, and pictures, including materials relating to a book on Civil War veterans in Egypt by William Best Hesseltine.
Creator Graves, Charles Iverson, 1838-1896.
Language English
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Restrictions to Access
No restrictions. Open for research.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the Charles Iverson Graves Papers #2606, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Alternate Form of Material
All or part of this collection available on microfilm.
Additional microfilm: All or part of this collection is also available on microfilm from University Publications of America as part of Southern women and their families in the 19th century, Series A. Inquire at the Davis Reference Desk, the Microforms Reading Room, or the Manuscripts Dept.
Acquisitions Information
Preserved and collected by Marguerite Graves of Columbia, S.C. Received in October 1963 from her sisters, Mrs. Arthur S. McCallum and Mrs. Roy Holler of Sanford, Fla., and Mrs. H. Prescott Herr of Wellston, Ohio.
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Biographical Information

Charles Iverson Graves (1838-1896) was the son of John Williams (d. 1847) and Martha Hinton Graves (fl. 1838-1854) of North Carolina. Sometime before his birth, his parents joined relatives living in Newton County, Ga., among them John's cousin, Iverson Lewis Graves and Martha's brother John Hinton. John's brother, Calvin Graves remained at Locust Hill in Caswell County, N.C., near Yanceyville. Calvin often advised his nephew Charles after the death of John Graves.

Charles attended the U.S. Naval Academy; served as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Navy until 1861 when he became an officer in the Confederate Navy; taught school and operated a vegetable farm near Rome, Ga.; spent three years in Egypt as a lieutenant-colonel in the Egyptian army, 1875-1878; and worked as a civil engineer on construction of the Georgia Pacific, and Memphis & Vicksburg railroads, 1881-1884. He married Margaret Rockwell Lea in November 1862. They had five children: Charles Iverson, Jr., William Lea, Mary Hinton, Robert William, and Anne Parke.

Margaret Rockwell Lea (fl. 1860-1898) was the daughter of William (d. 1856) and Mary Lea (fl. 1850-1868). When William Lea died, his wife and daughter lived with relatives in Mississippi and Tennessee until Mary married Calvin Graves, whose first wife Elizabeth had been her aunt. Mary and Maggie, as Margaret was called by the family, moved to Locust Hill, where she met and married Calvin's nephew Charles on 10 November 1862. Charles's pet name for Margaret was "Chi Chi."

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Scope and Content

Chiefly correspondence of Charles Iverson and Margaret Graves chiefly documenting his military career in the U.S. and Confederate navies, and his civilian engineering career, particularly his service in Egypt, but also his work on the Georgia Pacific and Memphis & Vicksburg railroads. The pair exchanged several hundred letters from 1875 to 1878 detailing his experiences in Egypt and her life at Locust Hill, Caswell County, N.C., where she tried to raise five children with limited economic resources. There is also correspondence relating to the Graves's farm in Rome, Ga., and others containing much information about the experiences of Graves and Lea family members who moved to Alabama and Mississippi before the Civil War. Also included are genealogical materials about the Graves, Lea, and related families and Charles Graves's writings on Egyptian culture. There are also other writings, notes, and pictures.

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Contents list

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series Quick Links

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 1. Correspondence, 1831-1914 and undated.

About 1,100 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Chiefly correspondence of Charles Iverson Graves and his wife Margaret Lea Graves. Significant correspondents also include members of the Lea, Graves, and related families of Petersburg, Va.; Yanceyville, N.C.; and Rome, Ga.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.1. 1831-1849.

About 10 items.

Chiefly Lea family correspondence, especially of the parents of Margaret Lea Graves--William Lea of Petersburg, Va., and Mary Lea of Leasburg, N.C. Also included are scattered letters from friends and relatives, mostly female, containing information about their experiences in moving west to Alabama and Mississippi.

Folder 1

Correspondence, 1831-1849 #02606, Subseries: "1.1. 1831-1849." Folder 1

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.2. 1850-1861.

About 80 items.

Correspondence of Graves and related families, documenting Charles Iverson Graves's attendance at the Naval Academy and his service with the U.S. Navy overseas; the courtship and marriage in 1859 of Calvin Graves and Mary Lea; and the courtship of Charles Graves and Margaret Lea.

In a letter of 19 December 1853, Alexander Stephens congratulated Charles upon his acceptance to the Naval Academy. Charles reestablished connections to the Graves family in North Carolina when he stayed with his Uncle Calvin in Caswell County on the way to Annapolis. Charles's mother and sister sent him neighborhood and family news from Newton County, Ga. In February 1858, Charles wrote his family from the U.S.S. Minnesota in China; there is only limited information about his experience in the efforts of the United States to establish trade connections in far eastern markets. (See also Series 3 for further documentation of Graves's service on the Minnesota.) Charles's letters aboard the Iroquois in the Mediterranean contain considerably more information about his naval experiences. From Italy, Charles sent his fiancee a picture of Garibaldi "with whom I have the honor to be well acquainted" (1 August 1860; see also Series 5). His letters include discussions of civil unrest in the area, and descriptions of the picturesque countryside and local culture of Naples and Rome. Charles resigned his commission in March 1861.

To his family, Charles expressed difficulty in making this decision: "I feel almost broken hearted at the sad condition of our country. If the two sections separate, peaceably even, they at once fall to third rate or fourth rate powers, whose voices in the affairs of nations will be of scarcely more importance than that of Mexico." But he declared, "I could never fight against the South, especially when I thought she was right" (16 March 1861). By December 1861, Charles had returned to Rome, Ga., with a commission as lieutenant in the Confederate Navy.

Scattered letters from Margaret Lea document her response to Charles Graves's romantic overtures. Much of the correspondence for 1858 documents Calvin Graves's courtship of her mother, Mary Lea. Margaret lived with them at Locust Hill after their marriage, and wrote Charles about such topics as Lincoln's election, secession of southern states, and a reading club she had helped establish "to relieve the monotony of country life" (23 January 1861).

Also of note during this period are letters from relatives, including Azariah Graves, who sold his land in North Carolina to move west; Sallie and Grizelda Hinton, who sent their nephew Charles news from Raleigh, N.C.; and scattered Lea family letters. Calvin Graves wrote about a great religious revival in North Carolina, including a "protracted meeting" at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, "during which there was a large number of converts" (17 October 1856).

Folder 2

1850-1853 #02606, Subseries: "1.2. 1850-1861." Folder 2

Folder 3

1854-1855 #02606, Subseries: "1.2. 1850-1861." Folder 3

Folder 4

1856-1857 #02606, Subseries: "1.2. 1850-1861." Folder 4

Folder 5

1858 #02606, Subseries: "1.2. 1850-1861." Folder 5

Folder 6

1859-1860 #02606, Subseries: "1.2. 1850-1861." Folder 6

Folder 7

1861 #02606, Subseries: "1.2. 1850-1861." Folder 7

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.3. 1862-1865.

About 120 items.

Correspondence between Margaret and Charles documenting the effects of the Civil War during the first years of their marriage. Letters from 1862 are primarily from Charles, who encouraged his fiancee, "Chi Chi," to "write to me often and freely; your letters never leave my hands but for the fire" (29 January 1862). Charles's frequent letters to Margaret document his activities in the Confederate Navy, first in Richmond and at Acquia Creek, then as executive officer of the Morgan off the coast of Mobile, Ala.

Charles and Margaret were married in November 1862. Thereafter, Margaret's letters show that she moved to Mobile to be near her husband. In March 1863, Charles received orders to "proceed South along the line of the Greensboro, Charlotte, and Columbia Railroad for the purpose of selecting a suitable locality for the [Confederate] Naval School" (4 March 1863). These orders quickly changed since Charles wrote two months later from Charleston, S.C., on his way to Europe (26 May 1863). Unfortunately, there are no letters documenting his narrow, blockade-running escape from federal forces or his tedious negotiations with French authorities, who were reluctant either to recognize the Confederacy or to release the ship he had been sent to command. Margaret's letters do, however, document her experiences in Mobile after her husband's departure. She wrote him that "exiles from New Orleans and refugees from Jackson continue to pour into Mobile" (28 May 1863). In 1864, she returned to Locust Hill in North Carolina to have their first child. See also Margaret's reminiscences in Series 3.

Folder 8

January-March 1862 #02606, Subseries: "1.3. 1862-1865." Folder 8

Folder 9

April-June 1862 #02606, Subseries: "1.3. 1862-1865." Folder 9

Folder 10

July-August 1862 #02606, Subseries: "1.3. 1862-1865." Folder 10

Folder 11

September-December 1862 #02606, Subseries: "1.3. 1862-1865." Folder 11

Folder 12

January-February 1863 #02606, Subseries: "1.3. 1862-1865." Folder 12

Folder 13

March 1863 #02606, Subseries: "1.3. 1862-1865." Folder 13

Folder 14

April-December 1863 #02606, Subseries: "1.3. 1862-1865." Folder 14

Folder 15

1864-1865 #02606, Subseries: "1.3. 1862-1865." Folder 15

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.4. 1866-1874.

About 50 items.

Letters documenting Graves family attempts to establish themselves on a farm called Maury near Rome, Ga. Letters show that by 1868 Charles and Margaret had moved to Georgia, where Charles taught school and grew melons because he found them "more profitable at 10c. a piece than corn or cotton" (28 August 1868). The Graveses actually grew a variety of crops at their farm, including okra, beets, onions, cabbages, and cucumbers, which they sold in local markets. During this period, Charles and Margaret steadily expanded their family. By 1873, they had five children: Charles Iverson, Jr., William Lea, Mary Hinton, Robert William, and Anne Parke. In the summer of 1874, while Margaret visited her family at Locust Hill and travelled in the North (see also Series 4), Charles was a delegate to the Georgia State Agricultural Convention at Stone Mountain.

Because Charles and Margaret were together in Georgia during much of this period, the bulk of the correspondence involves other family members. Especially prominent among these is Calvin Graves, who wrote to his wife while she was attending the birth of Margaret's daughter in Georgia. Calvin stayed at Locust Hill where he observed conditions near Yanceyville, N.C., as the community adjusted to changed social conditions in the aftermath of the Civil War. There is also significant correspondence from various relatives and friends in the west. William Lea sent news about relatives and the agricultural market from Holly Springs, Miss. (6 December 1868). S. E. Lea wrote from Princeton, Ark., complaining about martial law imposed by the "Radical" state government and discussing the impact of freedom on the local labor force (15 March 1869). R. P. Green contacted Margaret from California, with details about life in Stockton and San Francisco including such topics as the cost of living and the experiences of her brothers in wheat farming and sheep raising.

Folder 16

1866-1872 #02606, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1874." Folder 16

Folder 17

July 1874 #02606, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1874." Folder 17

Folder 18

August-November 1874 #02606, Subseries: "1.4. 1866-1874." Folder 18

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.5. 1875-1878.

About 750 items.

Correspondence of Charles Iverson Graves in Egypt and Margaret Lea Graves living with relatives at Locust Hill in Caswell County, and at Leasburg, N.C. There are more than three hundred letters from each of the Graveses. Margaret wrote her husband long letters about family matters, including the death of her stepfather and Charles's uncle, Calvin Graves (February 1877). Charles wrote from various locations in Egypt--Cairo; Massowa, where he was in charge of military shipping during the war with Abyssinia; Suez; and several Egyptian villages that he surveyed. In addition to his homesickness, his letters document details of his work, his observations about village life, landholding practices, farming, irrigation, tax collection, and other aspects of Egyptian culture.

Also included are military communications translated from French and Arabic into English; scattered letters from family members in North Carolina; correspondence from Henry W. Miller of New York, Charles's classmate at the Naval Academy, who managed Charles's financial affairs while he was in Egypt, sending Margaret money and relaying news; and letters from acquaintances of Charles in Egypt. (See also Series 2.)

Folder 19

June 1875 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 19

Folder 20

July 1875 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 20

Folder 21

August 1875 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 21

Folder 22

September 1875 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 22

Folder 23

October 1875 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 23

Folder 24

November 1875 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 24

Folder 25

December 1875 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 25

Folder 26

January 1876 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 26

Folder 27

1-14 February 1876 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 27

Folder 28

15-29 February 1876 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 28

Folder 29

March 1876 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 29

Folder 30

April-May 1876 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 30

Folder 31

June 1876 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 31

Folder 32

July 1876 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 32

Folder 33

August 1876 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 33

Folder 34

September 1876 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 34

Folder 35

October 1876 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 35

Folder 36

November 1876 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 36

Folder 37

1-16 December 1876 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 37

Folder 38

17-31 December 1876 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 38

Folder 39

January 1877 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 39

Folder 40

February 1877 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 40

Folder 41

March 1877 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 41

Folder 42

April 1877 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 42

Folder 43

May 1877 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 43

Folder 44

1-17 June 1877 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 44

Folder 45

18-30 June 1877 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 45

Folder 46

1-14 July 1877 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 46

Folder 47

15-31 July 1877 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 47

Folder 48

August 1877 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 48

Folder 49

1-13 September 1877 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 49

Folder 50

14-30 September 1877 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 50

Folder 51

October 1877 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 51

Folder 52

November 1877 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 52

Folder 53

December 1877 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 53

Folder 54

1-19 January 1878 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 54

Folder 55

20-31 January 1878 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 55

Folder 56

February 1878 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 56

Folder 57

1-17 March 1878 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 57

Folder 58

18-31 March 1878 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 58

Folder 59

1-14 April 1878 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 59

Folder 60

15-30 April 1878 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 60

Folder 61

May 1878 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 61

Folder 62

June 1878 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 62

Folder 63

July 1878 #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 63

Folder 64

August-December 1878 and fragments #02606, Subseries: "1.5. 1875-1878." Folder 64

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.6. 1881-1914.

About 150 items.

Letters chiefly documenting Charles Iverson Graves's career as a civil engineer. In 1881, Graves was employed by the Georgia Pacific Railroad building tracks in Georgia and Alabama. In 1882, he worked with the Memphis and Vicksburg Railroad, but was transferred in October to work as the engineering representative of the railroad for the Yazoo bridge. In 1883, work on the bridge was suspended and Graves was transferred to Clarksdale. Graves's work with the railroad took him away from his family, and he wrote letters home about the work he was doing, as well as his concerns for family finances and the importance of his children's education. These letters largely end in 1884 when Graves moved home to farm at Maury and to work as railroad agent in Rome, Ga. Thereafter, letters are from family members and friends, especially former classmates like F. V. McNair, for whom Graves helped to secure the position of commandant of the U.S. Naval Academy. Charles Iverson Graves died in 1896. Margaret Graves was still receiving letters of sympathy in 1898.

Twentieth-century letters chiefly relate to the family of Charles Iverson Graves, Jr., in Alexander City, Ala. Correspondence shows that his wife Josephine Nicholes Graves lived in Asheville, N.C., in 1907 while undergoing treatment for tuberculosis.

Folder 65

1881 #02606, Subseries: "1.6. 1881-1914." Folder 65

Folder 66

January-July 1882 #02606, Subseries: "1.6. 1881-1914." Folder 66

Folder 67

1-21 August 1882 #02606, Subseries: "1.6. 1881-1914." Folder 67

Folder 68

22-31 August 1882 #02606, Subseries: "1.6. 1881-1914." Folder 68

Folder 69

September-October 1882 #02606, Subseries: "1.6. 1881-1914." Folder 69

Folder 70

November-December 1882 #02606, Subseries: "1.6. 1881-1914." Folder 70

Folder 71

January 1883 #02606, Subseries: "1.6. 1881-1914." Folder 71

Folder 72

February-December 1883 #02606, Subseries: "1.6. 1881-1914." Folder 72

Folder 73

January-February 1884 #02606, Subseries: "1.6. 1881-1914." Folder 73

Folder 74

March-August 1884 #02606, Subseries: "1.6. 1881-1914." Folder 74

Folder 75

1889-1891 #02606, Subseries: "1.6. 1881-1914." Folder 75

Folder 76

1894 #02606, Subseries: "1.6. 1881-1914." Folder 76

Folder 77

1896-1914 #02606, Subseries: "1.6. 1881-1914." Folder 77

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.7. Undated.

About 25 items.

Undated letters and letter fragments from family members and friends.

Folder 78

Correspondence, Undated #02606, Subseries: "1.7. Undated." Folder 78

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 2. Egyptian Materials.

About 130 items.

Materials, other than letters (see Subseries 1.5), of Charles Iverson Graves, relating to Egypt, including official communications in French and Arabic; notes and writings by Graves about his experience in Egypt, including "Notes on the Country of the Somalis"; a multi-purpose journal he kept from 1875 to 1878, containing letter extracts, diary entries, expense accounts, and other information related to his duties with the army of the khedive; and a photograph album containing pictures of stereotypical Egyptian scenes, portraits of Egyptian men and women in both traditional and modern dress, and Egyptian landscapes collected by Graves.

Also included are materials of William Best Hesseltine that are related to Hesseltine's research for his book The Blue and the Gray on the Nile. These include correspondence, 1956-1962; press releases; publication proposals; and other materials. Hesseltine apparently also wanted to edit selected letters written by Charles Iverson Graves in Egypt, but was unable to find a publisher.

Folder 79-80

Folder 79

Folder 80

Charles Iverson Graves Materials 1875-1878 #02606, Series: "2. Egyptian Materials." Folder 79-80

Folder 81

Charles Iverson Graves Materials An address on Egypt and the Egyptians #02606, Series: "2. Egyptian Materials." Folder 81

Folder 82

Charles Iverson Graves Materials Journal, 1875-1878 #02606, Series: "2. Egyptian Materials." Folder 82

Folder 83

Charles Iverson Graves Materials Photo Album #02606, Series: "2. Egyptian Materials." Folder 83

Folder 84

William Best Hesseltine Materials 1956-1957 #02606, Series: "2. Egyptian Materials." Folder 84

Folder 85

William Best Hesseltine Materials 1958-1959 #02606, Series: "2. Egyptian Materials." Folder 85

Folder 86

William Best Hesseltine Materials 1960-1962 #02606, Series: "2. Egyptian Materials." Folder 86

Folder 87

William Best Hesseltine Materials Research materials #02606, Series: "2. Egyptian Materials." Folder 87

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 3. Genealogical Materials.

About 200 items.

Correspondence of Marguerite Graves concerning her genealogical research; her DAR application; histories of various family branches; and biographical information about Charles Iverson Graves, including printed accounts of Graves's life.

Folder 88-91

Folder 88

Folder 89

Folder 90

Folder 91

Charles Iverson Graves #02606, Series: "3. Genealogical Materials." Folder 88-91

Folder 92-93

Folder 92

Folder 93

Graves family #02606, Series: "3. Genealogical Materials." Folder 92-93

Folder 94

Hinton family #02606, Series: "3. Genealogical Materials." Folder 94

Folder 95

Lea family #02606, Series: "3. Genealogical Materials." Folder 95

Folder 96

Nicholes family #02606, Series: "3. Genealogical Materials." Folder 96

Folder 97

Williams family #02606, Series: "3. Genealogical Materials." Folder 97

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 4. Other Papers.

About 50 items.

Included are the technical log, 1859-1861, of Graves's voyage from New York to Italy on the Iroquois and financial and legal materials, including copies of family wills; Charles Graves's oath of allegiance, 17 May 1865; miscellaneous dry goods receipts, 1878-1888; and tuition receipts, 1901, for music lessons for Marguerite Graves. Margaret Lea Graves's reminiscences include discussions of the Graves's Civil War experiences fill gaps left in their correspondence, especially regarding the last days of the Confederacy, when Margaret accompanied her husband south while he guarded the retreat from Richmond of Jefferson Davis's family and the Confederate Treasury. Miscellaneous items include Charles Iverson Graves's French passport, 1864; an itinerary labeled "Summer Cruise 1874" outlining Margaret Lea Graves's trip north in July and August; grades of Charles Iverson Graves at the Naval Academy, 1857, and of Iverson and Willie Graves, 1877.

Folder 98

Technical log, 1859-1861 #02606, Series: "4. Other Papers." Folder 98

Folder 99

Financial and legal materials, 1843-1901 #02606, Series: "4. Other Papers." Folder 99

Folder 100

Reminiscences of Margaret Lea Graves (original and typed copy) #02606, Series: "4. Other Papers." Folder 100

Folder 101

Miscellaneous #02606, Series: "4. Other Papers." Folder 101

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 5. Pictures.

13 items.
Image P-2606/1

Charles Iverson Graves, in naval uniform, seated #02606, Series: "5. Pictures." P-2606/1

Inscribed: "Lieutenant Chas. Iverson Graves--Copy of photograph taken in Italy when he was on the U.S.S. sloop of war 'Iroquois'--Mediterranean Squadron. He wrote his resignation to Sec. of Navy, Isaac aboard the Iroquois, 1861." Picture shows Charles Iverson Graves, standing in Navy uniform.

Image P-2606/2

Charles Iverson Graves, seated #02606, Series: "5. Pictures." P-2606/2

Inscribed: "Colonel C. I. Graves in uniform of Egyptian Army."

Image P-2606/3

Solomon Lea. #02606, Series: "5. Pictures." P-2606/3

Image P-2606/4a

General Azariah Graves #02606, Series: "5. Pictures." P-2606/4a

Inscribed: "Husband of Elizabeth Williams (daughter of Colonel John Williams--Revolutionary ancestor) Caswell County, NC. Great-great grandfather of Marguerite Bryant Graves--daughter of Charles Iverson and Josephine Nicholes Graves."

Image P-2606/4b

General Azariah Graves #02606, Series: "5. Pictures." P-2606/4b

Image P-2606/5

Unidentified group of eight white children with three black women and one donkey #02606, Series: "5. Pictures." P-2606/5

Picture taken outside with people gathered around table. Boys wearing white dresses.

Image P-2606/6

Giuseppe Garibaldi #02606, Series: "5. Pictures." P-2606/6

Inscribed: "'Garibaldi'--This photograph was presented to C. I. Graves U.S. Navy, by Garibaldi himself during a visit to his camp near Naples--on eve of his victorious entry into the city--September 1860."

Image P-2606/7

Man in uniform #02606, Series: "5. Pictures." P-2606/7

Inscribed: "Colonel Chas. I. Graves. Rome, Ga. My dear Graves. Faithfully your classmate F. V. McNair, U.S. Naval Observatory. May 5, 1894."

Image P-2606/8

Unidentified woman--taken at the studio of Dr. F. Maderni, Milano #02606, Series: "5. Pictures." P-2606/8

Image P-2606/9

"Lady of the Harem" #02606, Series: "5. Pictures." P-2606/9

See folder 83 for photograph album with similar pictures collected by Charles Iverson Graves in Egypt.

Image P-2606/10

Unidentified young man, Labeled: "1866." #02606, Series: "5. Pictures." P-2606/10

Image P-2606/11

Unidentified bearded man, Labeled: "1866." #02606, Series: "5. Pictures." P-2606/11

Image P-2606/12

Unidentified landscape with a clearing of broken trees and hills in background #02606, Series: "5. Pictures." P-2606/12

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Processing Information

Processed by: Lisa Tolbert, November 1991

Encoded by: ByteManagers Inc., 2008

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