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Collection Number: 00299

Collection Title: Peter Wilson Hairston Papers, 1773-1986

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the section for more information.


This collection was rehoused under the sponsorship of a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Office of Preservation, Washington, D.C., 1990-1992.

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Size Linear Feet: 7.0 feet of linear shelf space (approximately Items: About 3400 items items)
Abstract Peter Wilson Hairston (1819-1886) was a tobacco planter of southwestern Virginia and north central North Carolina, Confederate soldier, and commission merchant. Other prominent family members include Peter Wilson Hairston's great-grandfather, Major Peter Hairston (1752-1832); his grandmother, Ruth Stovall Hairston (1784-1869); his step-grandfather, Robert Hairston (1782-1852); and his second wife, Frances McCoy Caldwell Hairston (1835-1907). Through his first wife, Columbia Stuart Hairston (d. ca. 1858), Hairston was also related to Jeb Stuart (1833-1864), under whom he served in the Civil War. Peter Wilson Hairston had four children, including Peter W. Hairston (1871-1943), who married Margaret George (1884-1963). They had two sons, Peter W. Hairston Jr. (born 1913) and Nelson G. Hairston (born 1917). The collection includes correspondence, financial and legal papers, plantation ledgers, travel diaries, and miscellaneous items documenting the business and personal affairs of the Hairston family. The bulk of the collection consists of correspondence of Peter W. Hairston and financial and legal papers of Major Peter Hairston. Letters and business items also appear for Robert and Ruth Hairston. Only limited information appears on Major Hairston's personal or family life, and no information is available on his Revolutionary War experiences. The papers of Peter W. Hairston provide mostly financial data on his plantations, but there are also letters relating to the courtship of his second wife and to family life in general. Little information appears, however, on his postwar commission firm. Plantations documented include Sauratown Hill in Stokes County and Cooleemee Hill in Davie County, N.C., and other plantations in Surry and Davidson counties, N.C.; Henry and Patrick counties, Va.; and in Columbus, Miss. The papers provide particularly rich opportunities for research on slaves. One volume contains accounts, 1815-1836, with a midwife who chiefly attended slave births. Peter Wilson Hairston's Civil War experiences, including his service, chiefly in Virginia as aid to Jeb Stuart with the 1st Virginia Cavalry and to Jubal A. Early, are documented in his correspondence and his Civil War diary. There are also volumes documenting European travel in the 1840s and 1850s, life in Chapel Hill, N.C., around the same period, documents relating to the work of freedmen and tenant farmers, clippings genealogical materials relating to Hairston family members, and other papers. The addition of October 1997 contains photocopies, typed transcriptions, and indexes of three Hairston family plantation record books and of pages found inserted in the record books. The addition of October 2004 is primarily Hairston family correspondence from 1930 to 1962, including some letters from family members serving in World War II, as well as financial documents and other family papers.
Creator Hairston, Peter Wilson, 1819-1886.
Language English
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Restrictions to Access
No restrictions. Open for research.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the Peter Wilson Hairston Papers #299, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Acquisitions Information
The bulk of the papers were received from Peter W. Hairston and Ruth Wilson Hairston inthe late 1930s. In July 1944, Mrs. Peter W. Hairston added five volumes. Other additions were received from Judge Peter W. Hairston of Advance, N.C., in October 1968, October 1986 (Acc. 86124), February 1987, October 1997 (Acc. 97130), and October 2004 (Acc. 99908).
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

These and related materials may be found under the following headings in online catalogs.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Biographical Information

Peter Wilson Hairston (1819-1886), tobacco planter of southwestern Virginia and north central North Carolina, Confederate soldier, and post Civil War commission merchant of Baltimore, grew up on Oak Hill Plantation in Pittsylvania County, Va. The son of Samuel Hairston (1788-1875) and Agnes John Peter Wilson (1801-1880), he received an A.B. in 1837 from the University of North Carolina before inheriting several plantations from his great-grandfather, Major Peter Hairston; his grandparents, Robert and Ruth Stovall Hairston; and other relatives. Hairston first married Columbia Stuart, who died circa 1858, leaving him two children, Elizabeth and Samuel. A year later he married Frances McCoy Caldwell (1835-1907) of Salisbury, N.C. Together they had five children: Samuel (1850-1867); Peter W. (1871-1943); Francis Caldwell (1862-1902); Agnes Wilson (1860-1914); and Ruth Wilson (1869-1947).

In the early 1840s, Hairston lived in Pittsylvania County. By the late 1850s, he had taken up residence at Cooleemee Hill Plantation in Davie County, N.C. In addition to growing tobacco, he operated a mill on the Yadkin River. During the Civil War, he served as an aide to his former brother-in-law, Jeb Stuart, in the 1st Regiment of the Virginia Cavalry Volunteers, and to Jubal Anderson Early in the Army of Northern Virginia. After the war, he moved to Baltimore, where he started a commission merchant business, Herbert & Hairston.

Peter Wilson Hairston's great-grandfather Major Peter Hairston (1752-1832) was a tobacco planter in Stokes, Surry, and Davie counties, N.C. Educated at the University of Virginia, he rose to the rank of major during the Revolution. In 1786, Hairston took up tobacco planting at Sauratown Hill Plantation in Stokes County. In 1817, he purchased Cooleemee Hill Plantation. Hairston married Alcey Perkins, daughter of Peter Perkins, and had one daughter, Ruth Stovall Hairston (1784-1869). Upon his death in 1832, he left the bulk of his lands to Ruth. Ruth's first marriage was to Peter Wilson, by whom she had one daughter, Agnes John Peter Wilson, who was the mother of Peter Wilson Hairston. After Peter Wilson's death, Ruth married her father's nephew, Robert Hairston, a tobacco planter of Henry County, Va., who also grew cotton in Columbus, Miss.

Peter Wilson Hairston (1871-1943) married Margaret George (1884-1963) and had two sons, Peter Wilson Jr. (born in 1913) and Nelson George (born in 1917). They lived at Cooleemee (Hill) Plantation. Peter W. Hairston Jr. attended the University of North Carolina School of Law and served as a judge in North Carolina. Nelson G. Hairston attended the University of North Carolina as an undergraduate, and worked in the World Health Organization. He also taught as a professor in the Department of Commerce (later called the Kenan-Flagler Business School) at the University of North Carolina. Both sons fought in World War II.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Scope and Content

Series 1 contains both business and personal correspondence, mostly of Peter W. Hairston. The financial and legal papers (Series 2) consist of deeds, land plats, surveys, plantation and personal accounts, slave bills of sale, receipts, loan notes, affidavits, and articles of agreement. The bulk of these pertain to Major Peter Hairston. Series 3, Other Loose Papers, contains clippings (mostly obituaries), broadsides, and miscellaneous items. The volumes in Series 4 are arranged chronologically by the earliest date appearing in them. They include mostly ledgers for Peter W. Hairston's plantations, domestic and European travel diaries, and genealogical publications. The addition of October 1997 contains photocopies, typed transcriptions, and indexes of three Hairston family plantation record books and of pages found inserted in the record books. The record books contain accounts and inventory lists, 1852-1882, of the property of Robert Hairston (1782-1852) and his wife, Ruth Stovall Hairston Wilson Hairston (1784-1869).

The collection best documents the business affairs of Peter W. Hairston and Major Peter Hairston. Only limited information appears on Major Hairston's personal or family life, and no information is available on his Revolutionary War experiences. The papers of Peter W. Hairston provide mostly data on his plantation finances. Little information appears on his postwar commission firm. Hairston's Civil War experiences are documented in his correspondence and his Civil War diary. His personal views on politics and religion appear frequently in his correspondence and travel diaries.

The papers provide rich opportunities for research on slaves. Slave bills of sale; slave lists (often giving ages); and slave birth records offer particularly fertile ground for genealogical research on slaves owned by Major Peter Hairston, Peter W. Hairston, Robert Hairston, Samuel Hairston, and Henry Hairston. Some information, mostly in plantation ledgers and enclosures, also appears on overseers and postwar plantation managers. Plantations for which documentation appears include Sauratown Hill Plantation, Cooleemee Hill Plantation, Shoe Buckle Plantation, Muddy Creek Plantation, Belew's Creek Plantation, Old Home Plantation, Town Fork Plantation, South Yadkin Plantation, Camp Branch Plantation, Colum Hill Plantation, Buzzard's Roost Plantation, Poverty Plains Plantation, Burnt Chimneys Plantation, and Locus Grove Plantation.

The addition of October 1997 contains photocopies, typed transcriptions, and indexes of three Hairston family plantation record books and of pages found inserted in the record books. The record books contain accounts and inventory lists, 1852-1882, of the property of Robert Hairston (1782-1852) and his wife, Ruth Stovall Hairston Wilson Hairston (1784-1869), who lived at Berry Hill Plantation in Pittsylvania County, Va.

The addition of October 2004 consists primarily of letters from Peter W. Hairston (1819-1886), Peter W. Hairston Jr. (born 1913) and Nelson G. Hairston (born 1917). The letters of Peter W. Hairston (1819-1886) are mainly from the period after the Civil War when he was living in Baltimore, Md., and were sent to his two daughters, Agnes Hairston and Ruth Hairston. The letters from Peter W. Hairston Jr. and Nelson G. Hairston are primarily from the period in which Peter attended the law school at the University of North Carolina and Nelson attended prep school at Virginia Episcopal School and college at the University of North Carolina. These letters were sent to their parents, Peter W. Hairston (1871-1943) and Margaret George Hairston. Major subjects include grades, exams, descriptions of their schools and the surrounding communities, family news, and plans for upcoming vacations.There are also many letters from their service in World War II, in which they were both stationed abroad. This addition also contains a small amount of financial documents and family papers. The family papers include clippings, material belonging to Peter W. Hairston Jr., photographs, a poem, and a two-starred flag that hung at Cooleemee Plantation while Peter and Nelson were serving in World War II.

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Contents list

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series Quick Links

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 1. Correspondence, 1787-1937 and undated.

About 330 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Business and family correspondence of Major Peter Hairston (1752-1832); Robert Hairston (1782-1852); Peter Wilson Hairston (1819-1886); and the family of Peter Wilson Hairston. Topics include plantation, ironworks, milling, and merchant affairs; land acquisitions; courtship; the Civil War; politics and religion, family and church life; the settlement of Peter Wilson Hairston's estate; and family history.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.1. Letters of Major Peter Hairston, 1787-1828 and undated.

51 items.

Correspondence chiefly pertaining to business affairs of Major Peter Hairston of Sauratown Hill Plantation in Stokes County, N.C. Included are letters received from commission merchants, business associates, and overseers, and letters exchanged with relatives and friends.

Frequent correspondents are Heathcock & Fenwick of Petersburg; Hairston's father-in-law, Peter Perkins; ironworks owner, James Martin; and Hairston's son-in-law, Robert Hairston. Family letters also appear from Hairston's brother, George Hairston, of Berry Hill, Va., and from George's son, Samuel, who was Robert Hairston's brother. One letter appears from N. P. Hairston in Warren County, Miss., to his father, John Hairston, at the Hairston Iron Works in Patrick County, Va., in which the younger Hairston described his activities in the new territory.

Letters from commission merchants discuss goods purchased and tobacco prices. Other business correspondence concerns Hairston's interest in the Union Iron Works (see letters from James Martin in 1796); the buying and selling of slaves, land, and horses; plantation work; land surveys; the collection of debts; and local business news. Family letters focus primarily on financial arrangements, family health, and visits.

Folder 1

1787-1799 #00299, Subseries: "1.1. Letters of Major Peter Hairston, 1787-1828 and undated." Folder 1

Folder 2

1803-1822 #00299, Subseries: "1.1. Letters of Major Peter Hairston, 1787-1828 and undated." Folder 2

Folder 3

1823-1828 and undated #00299, Subseries: "1.1. Letters of Major Peter Hairston, 1787-1828 and undated." Folder 3

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.2. Letters Received by Robert Hairston 1833-1840.

13 items.

Mostly business letters received by Robert Hairston in Henry County, Va., and Stokes County, N.C. Family letters also appear, including one addressed to his wife, Ruth Stovall Hairston.

About half the letters are from Samuel Nowlin & Son of Lynchburg and discuss items purchased, tobacco prices, the Tobacco Law (see 8 November 1839), and lands in Mississippi (see 28 August 1838). Two letters appear from Hairston's nephews, John H. Hairston and George Hairston, Jr., who managed his affairs in Columbus, Miss., where he grew cotton. The letters discuss hiring overseers and land acquisitions and rentals. William Wilson and Brice Edwards, overseers, also wrote Hairston at Sauratown in Stokes County from his plantation in Leatherwood, Henry Co., Va., to report on his crops, the health of his slaves, and other plantation matters. Miscellaneous letters from acquaintances discuss plantation and financial arrangements.

Of particular interest is a letter from Peter Wilson Hairston, a senior at the University of North Carolina, to his grandmother, Ruth Stovall Hairston. Dated 22 April 1837, the letter expressed Hairston's emotional attachment to Chapel Hill despite its being "a place without a single thing to attract the eye or a single charm to to [sic] captivate the heart."

Folder 4

1833-1840 #00299, Subseries: "1.2. Letters Received by Robert Hairston 1833-1840." Folder 4

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.3. Antelbellum Correspondence of Peter W. Hairston, 1839-1861.

About 95 items.

Processing note: See also Addition of October 2004.

Principally letters exchanged by Peter W. Hairston and Frances (Fanny) Caldwell during their courtship in the fall of 1858 and spring of 1859. Ten items, mostly letters Peter exchanged with his brothers and other relatives, appear between 1839 and 1855. One item appears in the spring of 1861.

Peter and Fanny's letters, written while Peter lived at Cooleemee Hill in Davie County and Fanny lived in Salisbury, discuss their feelings for each other, literary works, politics, religion, and family. Toward the end of this period, they often mentioned their marriage plans and the country's growing political tensions.

Of interest in Peter's letters are one, dated 2 December 1858, giving his opinions on the Catholic and Episcopal churches, and another, dated 26 January 1859, in which he described his meeting President Buchanan and other politicians in Washington. His letters in April 1859 from the St. Nicholas Hotel in New York provide a window on the social life there, his acquaintances, churches he attended, and politics. He occasionally remarked on the Republican and Free-Soil parties and on abolitionism. Fanny's letters discuss mostly her literary opinions and family events.

Scattered items before 1858 pertain mostly to family and plantation affairs. Of note is a letter, dated 29 October 1839, to Peter from his brother Robert at Chapel Hill, concerning Robert's winter vacation plans; the repeal of the Prayer Law at the university; and discussion of building a North Building on campus. Also of interest is a letter of 26 July 1851, from Peter's mother, Agnes Hairston, to her brother, discussing her crops, a local revival, and her brother George's mill. A photostatic copy of a letter from Jeb Stuart to Peter Hairston, written in 1854 from Salem, N.C., gives news of family and friends and local preaching and comments on progress made in building a house at Cooleemee.

One item, a letter dated 4 February 1861, from E. L. Stuart in Richmond to Peter Hairston, informed Hairston of the unavailability of a teacher he had been trying to employ because her parents feared the outbreak of war.

Folder 5

1839-1855 #00299, Subseries: "1.3. Antelbellum Correspondence of Peter W. Hairston, 1839-1861." Folder 5

Folder 6

October 1858-April 1859 #00299, Subseries: "1.3. Antelbellum Correspondence of Peter W. Hairston, 1839-1861." Folder 6

Folder 7-10

Folder 7

Folder 8

Folder 9

Folder 10

1859: January-June #00299, Subseries: "1.3. Antelbellum Correspondence of Peter W. Hairston, 1839-1861." Folder 7-10

Folder 11

1861: February #00299, Subseries: "1.3. Antelbellum Correspondence of Peter W. Hairston, 1839-1861." Folder 11

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.4. Civil War Letters of Peter W. Hairston, April 1861-1863.

48 items.

Civil War letters of Peter W. Hairston to his wife, Fanny, mostly during 1861, when he was travelling with the 1st Regiment of the Virginia Cavalry Volunteers as an aide to Jeb Stuart. Hairston wrote chiefly from camps in Fairfax, Beverley, and Prince William counties, including camps Bee, Longstreet, Jefferson Davis, Clover, and Bunker Hill. Several letters also appear from Martinsburg, Winchester, Richmond, and Alexandria, Va. Fanny, during this period, resided at the Spotswood House in Richmond, at Cascade in Pittsylvania County, and in Danville, Va. The letters contain information on help the Hairston family gave the Confederate Army, slave unrest in Virginia, the treatment of Unionists, camp gossip regarding Jefferson Davis and leading Confederate generals, and references to Dr. Dabney Carr, Methodist chaplain; William D. Pender; and Charles F. Fisher. One letter, dated 17 July 1861, appears from Charles F. Fisher, at Winchester, to "My dear Sister." In it, Fisher discussed the condition of his troops and their preparations for battle. Another item of note is a testimonial to Peter Hairston's commendable performance penned by Jeb Stuart on 12 October 1861, when Hairston left his service.

Only 11 items appear after 1861. Peter wrote Fanny sporadically in 1862 and 1863 from Richmond, Hanover Court House, and from near the Rapidan, while he was serving as an aide to Jubal Anderson Early. Principal topics are gossip about military personages, including Jeb Stuart, Early, and James B. Gordon, and about troop movements. A letter dated 10 November 1863 gives an account of the action at Rappahannock Bridge near Brandy Station. Further information on Hairston's Civil War experiences can be found in his war diary (see Volume 18 in Series 4).

Folder 12

1861: April-October #00299, Subseries: "1.4. Civil War Letters of Peter W. Hairston, April 1861-1863." Folder 12

Folder 13

1862-1863 #00299, Subseries: "1.4. Civil War Letters of Peter W. Hairston, April 1861-1863." Folder 13

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.5. Postbellum Correspondence of Peter W. Hairston, 1865-1886.

About 80 items.

Processing note: See also Addition of October 2004.

Personal correspondence of Peter Wilson Hairston, comprising chiefly letters to his wife and daughters, with scattered business letters.

In 1866, Hairston wrote Fanny often at Sauratown from Baltimore and Washington, D.C., describing his business prospects and his attempts to gain pardons for himself and his family. He on occasion mentioned conflicts between radical Republicans and ex-Confederates in Washington. Between 1866 and 1878, he wrote sporadically to Fanny in Baltimore while visiting family and attending to business in Salisbury and Windsor, N.C., and Buck Forest, Berry Hill Plantation, Oak Hill Plantation, Danville, and White Sulphur Springs, Va. His chiefly letters mostly family illnesses and news. Of note is a letter, dated 26 July 1868, in which Hairston described a flood in Baltimore and discussed the fate of former Confederates in the Courts. Most of the letters appearing after 1878 are from Peter in Baltimore and at various locations in North Carolina and Virginia to his daughters, Ruth and Agnes, and to Fanny at Cooleemee Hill. They contain news of family events, visitors, and friends. A few letters in 1882 concern Hairston's commission business. In 1885 and 1886, a handful of letters appear for Ruth and Agnes from their brother Francis (Frank) and various cousins and friends.

Folder 14

1865-1876 #00299, Subseries: "1.5. Postbellum Correspondence of Peter W. Hairston, 1865-1886." Folder 14

Folder 15

1879-1883 #00299, Subseries: "1.5. Postbellum Correspondence of Peter W. Hairston, 1865-1886." Folder 15

Folder 16

1884 #00299, Subseries: "1.5. Postbellum Correspondence of Peter W. Hairston, 1865-1886." Folder 16

Folder 17

1885 #00299, Subseries: "1.5. Postbellum Correspondence of Peter W. Hairston, 1865-1886." Folder 17

Folder 18

1886 #00299, Subseries: "1.5. Postbellum Correspondence of Peter W. Hairston, 1865-1886." Folder 18

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1887-1937 and undated.

41 items.

Processing note: See also Addition of October 2004.

Chiefly letters received by Fanny Hairston and her son, Frank Hairston, between 1887 and 1896, and by her daughter, Ruth Wilson Hairston, after 1897. A few items also appear for another son, Peter W. Hairston, and daughter, Agnes Hairston. Most of Fanny and Frank's letters are addressed to Sauratown and Cooleemee from J. A. O. in Columbus, Miss.; J. A. Early in Lynchburg; and W. A. Stuart and George W. Palmer in Saltville, Va., and concern the settlement of Peter W. Hairston's estate. Ruth's letters, addressed to her at Cooleemee from friends in Alexandria, Va.; Iowa City, Iowa; New York City; and Raleigh, N.C., discuss genealogy, church and family news, and mutual friends.

Of note are letters of condolence received by Ruth and Agnes upon the death of their brother, Frank, in 1902, and their mother, Fanny, in 1907. Also of interest is a tribute (enclosed in a letter of 9 February 1937), written by an African-American minister to Fanny Hairston upon her death.

Folder 19

1887-1896 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1887-1937 and undated." Folder 19

Folder 20

1887-1937 and undated #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1887-1937 and undated." Folder 20

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 2. Financial and Legal Papers, 1773-1902 and undated.

About 465 items.

Financial and legal papers of Major Peter Hairston, Robert Hairston, Peter Wilson Hairston (1819-1886), Fanny C. Hairston, Frank C. Hairston, and Peter Wilson Hairston (1871-1943). Included in Major Peter Hairston's papers are a number of items regarding the land holdings of Peter Perkins. Many items related to the affairs of Ruth Stovall Hairston can be found in the papers of Peter Wilson Hairston (1819-1886). The papers comprise mostly deeds, land plats, and surveys, with a number of accounts, slave bills of sale, receipts, loan notes, affidavits, and articles of agreement.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated.

About 275 items.

Chiefly deeds, plats, and surveys pertaining to the lands owned by Peter Hairston in Stokes and Surry counties, N.C. Deeds also appear for lands he acquired in Rowan and Mecklenburg counties. A handful of deeds appear for Stokes and Surry County lands purchased by Peter Perkins.

Other items consist of slave bills of sale, bonds, accounts with commission merchants, tax and other receipts, loan notes, and articles of agreement with overseers and others. Most of the slave bills of sale appear between 1821 and 1826, with one for 1815. Accounts are primarily for plantation and household goods bought of Heathcock & Fenwick of Petersburg. Accounts also appear with William & James Douglas of Petersburg; Thomas & Curtis of Fayetteville; Hector & McNeill; and Smith Carson.

Of note is the will, dated 22 July 1823, of Preston Gilbert of Pittsylvania County, Va.

Folder 21

1773-1779 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 21

Folder 22

1780-1782 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 22

Folder 23

1783-1784 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 23

Folder 24

1785-1787 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 24

Folder 25

1788 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 25

Folder 26

1789 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 26

Folder 27

1790-1791 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 27

Folder 28

1792-1793 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 28

Folder 29

1794 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 29

Folder 30

1795 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 30

Folder 31

1796-1797 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 31

Folder 32

1798-1799 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 32

Folder 33

1800-1802 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 33

Folder 34

1803-1804 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 34

Folder 35

1805-1810 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 35

Folder 36

1811-1815 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 36

Folder 37

1816-1817 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 37

Folder 38

1818-1819 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 38

Folder 39

1820-1822 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 39

Folder 40

1823 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 40

Folder 41

1824-1825 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 41

Folder 42

1826-1827 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 42

Folder 43

1828-1832 #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 43

Folder 44

Undated #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 44

Folder 45

Undated fragments #00299, Subseries: "2.1. Papers of Major Peter Hairston, 1773-1832 and undated." Folder 45

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.2. Papers of Robert Hairston, 1833-1941 and undated.

47 items.

Bills, deeds, accounts, receipts, and miscellaneous papers related to the plantation and legal affairs of Robert Hairston. About half the items are bills for charges by witnesses appearing in the cases of Robert Hairston v. Absalom Bostick, Jr. and Robert Hairston v. Jesse McAnally in Stokes County during 1835 and 1836. Other items include deeds for lands in Davidson and Stokes counties; accounts with merchants; and receipts for tobacco and corn, probably made out to tenants who farmed Hairston's land. Of note are an indenture made 16 November 1833 for the rental of Hairston's mill in Stokes County and an article of agreement, 8 November 1833, with overseer William Wilson hiring him to manage the Shoe Buckle Plantation.

Folder 46

1833-1835 #00299, Subseries: "2.2. Papers of Robert Hairston, 1833-1941 and undated." Folder 46

Folder 47

1836-1837 #00299, Subseries: "2.2. Papers of Robert Hairston, 1833-1941 and undated." Folder 47

Folder 48

1838-1841 and undated #00299, Subseries: "2.2. Papers of Robert Hairston, 1833-1941 and undated." Folder 48

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.3. Antebellum Papers of Peter W. Hairston, 1842-1861.

About 60 items.

Mostly papers kept by Peter W. Hairston on the finances of his grandmother, Ruth Stovall Hairston, whose affairs he managed, and his own plantation papers.

About two-thirds of the items appear between 1852 and 1856 for Ruth Hairston, and include primarily receipts and accounts from commission merchants, druggists, doctors, and other merchants in Columbus, Miss., where she owned a plantation. Many of these items are in the name of John Witherspoon, her Columbus agent. The bulk of the accounts are with Cozart, Humphries, & Billups; Lampkin & Whitfield; Humphries, Walsh & Co; and druggist James Blair. Of note in her papers is the power-of-attorney she signed over to Peter W. Hairston on 4 December 1852; her cumulative accounts with John Witherspoon between 1853 and 1856; and lists of her property for taxes in 1853 and 1854.

Peter W. Hairston's papers are chiefly deeds for land he owned in Davie, Davidson, and Stokes counties. Other items include miscellaneous receipts, accounts, bonds, and lists of tobacco and corn picked by slaves at Shoe Buckle and Old Town plantations in the 1850s.

Folder 49

1842-1848 #00299, Subseries: "2.3. Antebellum Papers of Peter W. Hairston, 1842-1861." Folder 49

Folder 50

1850-1853 #00299, Subseries: "2.3. Antebellum Papers of Peter W. Hairston, 1842-1861." Folder 50

Folder 51

1854-1856 #00299, Subseries: "2.3. Antebellum Papers of Peter W. Hairston, 1842-1861." Folder 51

Folder 52

1860-1861 #00299, Subseries: "2.3. Antebellum Papers of Peter W. Hairston, 1842-1861." Folder 52

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.4. Unidentified Antebellum Papers, undated.

11 items.

Mostly unidentified land surveys. Items of interest are a list of lands adjoining Cooleemee Hill Plantation and a town plat of Hairstonburg on the Dann River.

Folder 53

Undated papers #00299, Subseries: "2.4. Unidentified Antebellum Papers, undated." Folder 53

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.5. Civil War and Postbellum Papers of Peter W. Hairston, 1862-1884.

25 items.

Processing note: See also Addition of October 2004.

Principally legal and financial papers regarding Hairston's leasing of lands in North Carolina and Virginia after he moved to Baltimore, and scattered financial items for Fanny Hairston.

Land rental agreements; receipts for taxes, crops produced, and monies owed; and deeds to Davie County and Pittsylvania County properties appear between 1862 and 1883. Only two Civil War items, both receipts, appear. Of note in the papers is an article of agreement Hairston signed on 20 December 1865 hiring John Lindsay to operate his mill on the Yadkin River. After the war, Hairston served as executor of his father Samuel Hairston's estate, for which one receipt appears in 1875, and as agent for his mother, Agnes Hairston, for whom he rented out her Goosewood Plantation in 1877.

After 1881, several accounts appear for Fanny Hairston with Baltimore and Washington jewelers, dressmakers, and florists.

Folder 54

1862-1878 #00299, Subseries: "2.5. Civil War and Postbellum Papers of Peter W. Hairston, 1862-1884." Folder 54

Folder 55

1880-1884 #00299, Subseries: "2.5. Civil War and Postbellum Papers of Peter W. Hairston, 1862-1884." Folder 55

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.6. Other Hairston Family Papers, 1886-1902.

44 items.

Processing note: See also Addition of October 2004.

Chiefly the estate papers of Peter W. Hairston, kept by his sons, Frank C. Hairston, executor, and Peter W. Hairston, estate agent, with items also appearing that relate to the finances of Fanny Hairston. In later years Jubal Anderson Early acted as administrator of the estate.

The estate papers include loan notes, account statements, court petitions, and receipts. Several items pertain to the settlement of the accounts of Hairston's commission business in Baltimore. Of particular interest is a statement of the assets and liabilities, circa 1901, of "Peter Hairston, colored," including a list of receipts held by the estate of Peter W. Hairston. Also of interest is a land rental agreement for Sauratown made between Peter W. Hairston, as estate agent, and Edward A. and Annie Byrd Watson, on 7 February 1902.

Accounts and receipts also appear for Frank C. Hairston with John F. Ward, dry goods merchant of Lexington, N.C., and for Fanny Hairston, for miscellaneous services.

Undated items are accounts of Fanny Hairston and land plats and miscellaneous items pertaining to the purchase of lands in Stokes County, N.C.

Folder 56

1886-1891 #00299, Subseries: "2.6. Other Hairston Family Papers, 1886-1902." Folder 56

Folder 57

1892-1902 #00299, Subseries: "2.6. Other Hairston Family Papers, 1886-1902." Folder 57

Folder 58

Undated #00299, Subseries: "2.6. Other Hairston Family Papers, 1886-1902." Folder 58

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 3. Other Loose Papers, 1859-1965 and undated.

27 items.

Processing note: See also Addition of October 2004.

Chiefly printed and typescript obituaries and memorials for Hairston family members, including Samuel Hairston (1850-1867); Peter Wilson Hairston (1819-1886); Francis Caldwell Hairston (1862-1902); Frances Caldwell Hairston (1835-1907); and Peter W. Hairston (1871-1943). Other items include clippings on Cooleemee Hill Plantation; merchant price lists; religious materials; and miscellaneous items.

Of note are a printed advertisement for Herbert, Hairston & Co. of Baltimore, dated 1870; a letter, probably written in the 1930s, to the Charlotte Observer from an African-American preacher, giving his views on servant-employee relations, organized labor, and the training of domestic workers; and a typed copy of an oral interview Peter W. Hairston, III, conducted with William T. Hairston, great-grandson of Hairston slaves, in 1965. Also of interest are the undated music and lyrics for a song entitled "Kitty, Sweet Kitty," by Christofero.

Folder 59

1859-1886 #00299, Series: "3. Other Loose Papers, 1859-1965 and undated." Folder 59

Folder 60

1889-1908 #00299, Series: "3. Other Loose Papers, 1859-1965 and undated." Folder 60

Folder 61

1938-1949, 1965 and undated #00299, Series: "3. Other Loose Papers, 1859-1965 and undated." Folder 61

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 4. Volumes, 1784-1943, 1986.

31 items.

Arrangement: chronological by earliest date.

Plantation ledgers of Peter Wilson Hairston, Major Peter Hairston, Ruth Stovall Hairston, and Robert Hairston; travel diaries of Peter Wilson Hairston and Fanny Hairston; Civil War diary of Peter Wilson Hairston; and miscellaneous volumes. Ledgers are for plantations in Henry and Patrick counties, Va., and Stokes, Surry, Davie, and Davidson counties, N.C. Miscellaneous volumes pertain to genealogy and estate settlements.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877.

17 items.

Chiefly ledgers kept by Major Peter Hairston for his Sauratown Hill Plantation between 1784 and 1832 and by Peter Wilson Hairston for a number of North Carolina and Virginia plantations between 1840 and 1877. A few accounts appear for Robert and Ruth Stovall Hairston. Domestic and European travel diaries appear between 1843 and 1860.

Ledgers of Major Peter Hairston contain contracts with overseers and accounts for tobacco; iron goods; blacksmithing and midwife services; and dry goods, groceries, and hardware items. Hairston seems to have operated an ironworks and employed a blacksmith on or near Sauratown Hill. Volume 1 (289 pages) contains accounts for 1784-1786; Volume 2 (252 pages), accounts for 1785-1789; and Volume 3 (270 pages) for the years 1792-1803 and 1812, with most of the entries falling between 1794 and 1797.

Volume 4 (204 pages) contains both Hairston's accounts for 1797-1832 and those of Robert and Ruth Stovall Hairston for 1833-1843. Of note are extensive entries made between 1815-1836 with Sarah (Mrs. Theodore) Welch for midwife services, mostly for slave births at Old Town, Muddy Creek, and Belew's Creek plantations. Also included in the volume are slave registers and tax receipts pertaining to Sauratown, Shoe Buckle, Muddy Creek, Belew's Creek, Old Town, and Poverty Plains plantations.

Volume 5 (240 pages) contains entries of Peter Hairston for 1827-1832, Robert Hairston for 1833-1850, and Ruth Stovall Hairston and Peter Wilson Hairston for 1850-1868. Besides accounts, the ledger has slave registers for Home House, Old Town, Buzzard's Roost, Muddy Creek, Belew's Creek, and Shoe Buckle plantations; tax receipts; and overseers' contracts.

Volumes 6, 9-10, and 13-14 are ledgers kept by Peter Wilson Hairston between 1840 and 1877 and comprise mostly accounts with overseers and farm hands for tobacco and wheat produced and provisions provided. Extensive information on slaves also appears.

Volume 6, dated 1844-1864, holds 160 pages of accounts with overseers and merchants for Cooleemee Hill. Also appearing are slave lists and lists of slave births. Volume 9 contains accounts kept with G. G. Mason, overseer at Colum Hill Plantation. Detailed lists of taxable properties in Davie, Davidson, and Stokes counties, and lists of slaves and livestock at Town Fork, South Yadkin, Colum Hill, Cooleemee Hill, Camp Branch, and other locations appear scattered throughout the 223-page volume. Of particular interest are pages 32-108, which contain copies of letters and legal documents concerning court battles over Robert Hairston's (1752-1852) estate, which Hairston tried to leave to a slave child. Included are the wills of Major Peter Hairston and Robert Hairston and a lengthy court opinion.

Volume 10 is a 127-page ledger for Camp Branch and South Yadkin plantations and includes primarily postwar work agreements and accounts with freedmen and plantation manager, Johnson G. Giles, between 1866-1868, and in 1875. Accounts dated between 1844-1866 appear on pages 1-44 and are with Johnson Giles for the South Yadkin Plantation. Of note is a list of slaves received by Peter W. Hairston from Sauratown and from his father's estate in 1853.

Volume 13 contains accounts with plantation managers G. G. Mason at Camp Branch, Johnson Giles at South Yadkin, E. Myers at Town Fork, and others for crops produced, lumber, and provisions between 1855 and 1865. Scattered accounts also appear in this 89-page volume for Cooleemee Hill Plantation.

Volume 14 accounts are mostly those Hairston kept as executor of the estate of Henry Hairston between 1857 and 1875, and pertain to Burnt Chimneys Plantation in Henry County, Va. A few pages of his own accounts with Johnson Giles appear for 1874-1876.

Volume 15, an unidentified ledger, is dated March-October 1859, and lists 23 pages of accounts for sundries, commissions, shipments, railroad stock, and miscellaneous expenditures. The first two pages of the ledger are missing.

Abundant enclosures appear in Volumes 1-4, 9-10, and 14, and include accounts, receipts, overseers' agreements, slave lists, letters, and poems. Of particular note are a copy of a Petition of Real and Personal Property of Ruth S. Hairston, dated 2 June 1869 (Vol. 1); slave lists for Buzzard's Roost Plantation (Vol. 4); and a bill of complaint in re George Hairston vs. Ruth S. Hairston, dated 28 February 1854 (Vol. 14).

Volumes 7-8, 11-12, and 16-17 are travel diaries. Peter W. Hairston kept a detailed account between October 1843 and July 1844 (Vols. 7-8) of his travels in England, France, and Italy. Entries made in London, Manchester, Birmingham, Versailles, Paris, Marseilles, Lyon, Genoa, Pisa, Rome, and Pompeii describe local sights, industries, government, and social customs. Of note are pages 37-39 and 48-50 of Volume 7, which describe George Catlin's Gallery of Indian Paintings and several Ojibway Indians Hairston met there. Appearing at the end of Volume 8 are a number of undated poems and excerpts from historical works, and copies of sermons by Reverend I. H. Parker of Salisbury, N.C., dated 1857-1858.

Volumes 11 and 12 describe Hairston's travels in Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., and Virginia. Volume 11 contains 46 pages of entries between 30 October and 17 November 1845, and Volume 12 contains 149 pages dated between 19 November and 31 December 1845. Volume 11 and the first 77 pages of Volume 12 describe Hairston's time in Philadelphia. He wrote frequently concerning lectures at the University of Pennsylvania and churches and political meetings he attended, including Quaker Meeting and the Dutch Reformed Church and a meeting to abolish capital punishment. He also commented often on race relations in the city. Of note in Volume 13 are Hairston's descriptions of the House of Refuge, a home for juvenile delinquents, and asylums for the deaf and mute and for the blind. Pages 78-96 describe a trip Hairston took to Washington, D.C., where he visited with friends between 12-17 December, and the remainder of the volume describes his visits with Virginia relatives.

Volumes 16 and 17 are the travel diary of Peter and Fanny Hairston while they toured Europe on their honeymoon. Volume 16, containing 173 pages, was kept mostly by Fanny between August and November 1859, and describes their travels in England, Ireland, Scotland, France, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and Italy. Descriptions are mostly of castles, churches, gardens, and museums they visited. Volume 17, 266 pages in length, was kept primarily by Peter between 3 December 1859 and 19 May 1860, and focuses on time they spent in Italy and France. Topics include artworks and sights seen, visits made, and news obtained from home. Occasional comments appear on the growing political tensions in the United States.

Folder 62

Volume 1, Ledger, Peter Hairston, 1784-1786 #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." Folder 62

Folder 63

Enclosures, Volume 1 #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." Folder 63

Folder 64

Volume 2, Ledger, Peter Hairston, 1785-1789 #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." Folder 64

Folder 65

Enclosures, Volume 2 #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." Folder 65

Folder 66

Volume 3, Ledger, Peter Hairston, 1792-1812 #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." Folder 66

Folder 67

Enclosures, Volume 3 #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." Folder 67

Oversize Volume SV-299/4

Volume 4, Ledger, Peter Hairston, Ruth Stovall Hairston, Robert Hairston, 1797-1843 #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." SV-299/4

Folder 68

Enclosures, Volume 4 #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." Folder 68

Oversize Volume SV-299/5

Volume 5, Ledger, Peter Hairston, Ruth Stovall Hairston, Robert Hairston, Peter Wilson Hairston, 1827-1868 #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." SV-299/5

Oversize Volume SV-299/6

Volume 6, Ledger, Peter Hairston, 1840-1865 #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." SV-299/6

Folder 69

Volume 7, Diary, Peter Hairston, October 1843-February 1844 #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." Folder 69

Folder 70

Volume 8, Diary, Peter Hairston, 1844: May-July #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." Folder 70

Folder 71

Volume 9, Ledger, Peter Hairston, 1844-1864 #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." Folder 71

Folder 72

Enclosures, Volume 9 #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." Folder 72

Oversize Volume SV-299/10

Volume 10, Ledger, Peter Hairston, 1844-1875 #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." SV-299/10

Folder 73

Enclosures, Volume 10 #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." Folder 73

Folder 74

Volume 11, Diary, Peter Hairston, 1845: October-November #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." Folder 74

Folder 75

Volume 12, Diary, Peter Hairston, 1845: November-December #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." Folder 75

Folder 76

Volume 13, Ledger, Peter Hairston, 1855-1865 #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." Folder 76

Oversize Volume SV-299/14

Volume 14, Ledger, Peter Hairston, 1857-1864, 1874-1876 #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." SV-299/14

Folder 77

Enclosures, Volume 14 #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." Folder 77

Folder 78

Volume 15, Ledger, Unidentified, 1859: March-October #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." Folder 78

Folder 79

Volume 16, Diary, Peter W. and Fanny Hairston, 1859: August-November #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." Folder 79

Folder 80

Volume 17, Diary, Peter W. and Fanny Hairston, 1859-1860 #00299, Subseries: "4.1. Antebellum Volumes, 1784-1877." Folder 80

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 4.2. Civil War Diary, 1863: November-December.

2 items.

Original (with typed transcription) of the Civil War diary of Peter W. Hairston. Kept between 7 November and 13 December 1863, while Hairston was an aide to Jubal Anderson Early near Culpeper and Richmond, Va., the diary contains anecdotes of Robert E. Lee, Richard Stoddert Ewell, Robert Hall Chilton, Harry T. Hays, Alexander S. Pendleton, Chaplain B. Tucker Lacy, and Robert F. Hoke. Also included are mentions of disloyal sentiments in North Carolina. In December, the diary (Volume 18) records that Hairston was no longer needed in his position and returned home to his Cooleemee Hill Plantation.

Folder 81

Volume 18, Diary, Peter W. Hairston, 1863: November-December #00299, Subseries: "4.2. Civil War Diary, 1863: November-December." Folder 81

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986.

12 items.

Nine ledgers kept by plantation managers with freedmen and other tenants working the land of Peter W. Hairston; one ledger of accounts for Samuel Hairston's estate; and two volumes on Hairston family history.

Volume 19 contains 126 pages of accounts maintained by Johnson G. Giles between 1866 and 1869 with tenants on an unidentified plantation. Accounts are for wages paid, tobacco produced, and provisions given. Volume 20, 112 pages in length, contains similar accounts of Giles and of William Hodges with tenants between 1867 and 1869, and Volume 21, having 123 pages, has Giles's and Hodges's accounts for 1870 through 1871. Their accounts for 1870 through 1873 appear in Volume 22 (134 pages). Volume 23, a ledger kept by Giles for Hairston's Locust Grove Plantation in Henry County, Va., includes 176 pages of accounts and work agreements made with tenants. Volume 25 comprises Giles's and George Mason's accounts with tenants and work agreements for 1876-1877.

Volumes 26 (101 pages) and 27 (104 pages) contain the accounts of plantation manager, John S. Townes, with tenants at an unspecified location between 1876-1879 and 1878-1879. Work agreements also appear.

Volume 28 has accounts with tenants of plantation manager John Beard and agent Frank Brown, possibly at Cooleemee Hill Plantation, and accounts of George Wilson with tenants at Muddy Creek Plantation. The accounts are dated 1879-1883.

Accounts Peter W. Hairston kept as executor of his father Samuel Hairston's estate, appear in Volume 24. Thirty pages of accounts cover the years 1875-1877.

Enclosures to Volumes 19-28 include mostly bills and receipts and miscellaneous correspondence of plantation managers and advertising broadsides. Items of note are a slave list for Burnt Chimneys Plantation for 1860 (Vol. 19); notes on natural philosophy (Vol. 20); an advertising circular, dated 1873, for Herbert & Hairston (Vol. 21); and an 1861 list of taxables for Henry Hairston (Vol 27).

Two volumes containing genealogical information on Hairston family members appear. Volume 29 is a 20-page notebook of obituaries clipped from newspapers. Volume 30 is a manuscript, Some Descendants of Peter Hairston, written in 1986 by Peter Wilson Hairston. Included at the end of the book is a photocopy of a document entitled "Genealogy of the Wilson Family of Pittsylvania County, Virginia."

Folder 82

Volume 19, Ledger, Peter W. Hairston, 1866-1869 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 82

Folder 83

Enclosures, Volume 19 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 83

Folder 84

Volume 20, Ledger, Peter W. Hairston, 1867-1869 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 84

Folder 85

Enclosures, Volume 20 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 85

Folder 86

Volume 21, Ledger, Peter W. Hairston, 1870-1871 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 86

Folder 87

Enclosures, Volume 21 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 87

Folder 88

Volume 22, Ledger, Peter W. Hairston, 1870-1873 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 88

Folder 89

Enclosures, Volume 22 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 89

Folder 90

Volume 23, Ledger, Peter W. Hairston, 1873-1875 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 90

Folder 91

Enclosures, Volume 23 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 91

Folder 92

Volume 24, Ledger, Peter W. Hairston, 1875-1877 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 92

Folder 93

Volume 25, Ledger, Peter W. Hairston, 1876-1877 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 93

Folder 94

Enclosures, Volume 25 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 94

Folder 95

Volume 26, Ledger, Peter W. Hairston, 1876-1879 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 95

Folder 96

Enclosures, Volume 26 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 96

Folder 97

Volume 27, Ledger, Peter W. Hairston, 1878-1879 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 97

Folder 98

Enclosures, Volume 27 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 98

Folder 99

Volume 28, Ledger, Peter W. Hairston, 1879-1883 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 99

Folder 100

Enclosures, Volume 28 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 100

Folder 101

Volume 29, Ledger, Peter W. Hairston, 1884-1943 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 101

Folder 102

Enclosures, Volume 29 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 102

Folder 103

Volume 30, "Some Descendants of Peter Hairston," 1986 #00299, Subseries: "4.3. Postbellum Volumes, 1866-1943, 1986." Folder 103

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Additions, 1997-2004.

About 2530 items.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Addition of October 1997 (Acc. 97130).

About 30 items.

Photocopies, typed transcriptions, and indexes of three Hairston family plantation record books and of pages found inserted in the record books. The record books contain accounts and inventory lists, 1852-1882, of the property of Robert Hairston (1782-1852) and his wife, Ruth Stovall Hairston Wilson Hairston (1784-1869), who lived at Berry Hill, a plantation in Pittsylvania County, Va. These records were transcribed by Jo Ann Whitson Cuddy of Bristol, Va. Words underlined in the transcription are those the transcriber had difficulty interpreting. Transcribed pages are interspersed behind photocopied pages of records. Each volume also includes an index of names and places.

Book I, 1852-1862, contains records of Pittsylvania County, Va., property; Leatherwood, 1665 acres in Henry County, Va.; Burnt Chimnies in Henry County, Va.; Saura Town in Stokes County, N.C.; and a plantation in Mississippi. Included are an inventory of the personal estate of Robert Hairston at Leatherwood and Burnt Chimnies, lists of slaves, list of amounts for feeding and clothing slave, amounts paid to the slaves, accounts of expenses of the estates of Robert Hairston and Peter Hairston, and other financial records of the plantations.

Book II is chiefly devoted to Berry Hill, a plantation of 700 acres in Pittsylvanie County, Va. It contains notations of births, 1854-1862, and deaths, 1839-1862, of slaves, other slave lists, and plantation accounts. After 1865, the book includes accounts with African-American farm workers. Also included are accounts, 1869, of the estate of Ruth S. Hairston, and disbursements, 9 September 1882.

Book III, 1852-1873, lists property, including slaves, horses, cattle, sheep, hogs, and farm implements, of various other plantations in 1852. Inventories are given for farms forming Upper Saura Town in Stokes County, N.C. and covering approximately 10,000 acres. After Saura Town Hill come Old Town, located south of Highway 311; Shoe Buckle, east and south of the Dan River; Hamburg, on the west side of the Dan River; Town Fork; Muddy Creek, below Town Fork and Stokes County; and Belew’s (spelled Balew in the records) Creek Plantation in northeast Forsyth County, N.C. In addition, there are lists of slaves in Pittsylvania County, Va.; Davie County, N.C., and those belonging to the estate of Peter Hairston who were then in Henry County, Va.

The loose papers, 1791-1884, contain several slave lists; a will of Peter Hairston, 1832; a deed, 1791; a list of men arms, ammunition, and accoutrements of the 110th Regiment of the militia in Franklin County, Va., commanded by Samuel Hairston, 6 November 1806; and other items.

Folder 104

Book I #00299, Subseries: "Addition of October 1997 (Acc. 97130)." Folder 104

Folder 105

Book II #00299, Subseries: "Addition of October 1997 (Acc. 97130)." Folder 105

Folder 106

Book III #00299, Subseries: "Addition of October 1997 (Acc. 97130)." Folder 106

Folder 107

Loose papers sets I and II #00299, Subseries: "Addition of October 1997 (Acc. 97130)." Folder 107

Papers found inserted in the plantation record books.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Addition of October 2004 (Acc. 99908).

About 2500 items.

Processing Note: The Addition of October 2004 is arranged in the same way as, but has not been incorporated into, the original deposit of materials.

Primarily letters from Peter W. Hairston (1819-1886), Peter W. Hairston Jr. (born 1913) and Nelson G. Hairston (born 1917). The letters of Peter W. Hairston (1819-1886) are mainly from the period after the war when he was living in Baltimore, and were sent to his two daughters. The letters from Peter W. Hairston Jr. and Nelson G. Hairston are primarily from the time when Peter attended law school at the University of North Carolina and Nelson attended prep school at Virginia Episcopal School and college at the University of North Carolina. These often affectionate letters were sent to their parents, Peter W. Hairston and Margaret George Hairston. Major subjects include grades, exams, descriptions of their schools and the surrounding communities, family news, and plans for upcoming vacations.

There are also many letters from Peter and Nelson during their service in World War II, during which they were both stationed abroad. They describe some of their experiences, and also their feelings following their father's death in 1943. Following the war, Nelson and his family lived in the Phillipines for a period in the early 1950s, and sent letters from there.

Among Peter and Nelson's letters are scattered letters from other family members and friends, also sent to Peter W. Hairston and Margaret Hairston.

This addition contains a small amount of financial documents and family papers. The family papers include clippings, material belonging to Peter W. Hairston Jr., photographs, a poem, and a two-starred flag that hung at Cooleemee Plantation while Peter W. Hairston Jr. and Nelson G. Hairston were serving in World War II.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.3. Antelbellum Correspondence of Peter W. Hairston, 1837.

1 item.

Letter from Peter W. Hairston to his brother regarding the administration of various plantations.

Folder 108

1837 #00299, Subseries: "1.3. Antelbellum Correspondence of Peter W. Hairston, 1837." Folder 108

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.5. Postbellum Correspondence of Peter W. Hairston, 1879-1886.

About 75 items.

Affectionate letters from Peter W. Hairston to his daughters Agnes and Ruth. Topics include his life in Baltimore as he worked in his commission merchant business, and inquiries about the family life back home at Cooleemee Plantation.

Folder 109

1879-1883 #00299, Subseries: "1.5. Postbellum Correspondence of Peter W. Hairston, 1879-1886." Folder 109

Folder 110

1884 #00299, Subseries: "1.5. Postbellum Correspondence of Peter W. Hairston, 1879-1886." Folder 110

Folder 111-112

Folder 111

Folder 112

1885 #00299, Subseries: "1.5. Postbellum Correspondence of Peter W. Hairston, 1879-1886." Folder 111-112

Folder 113

1886 #00299, Subseries: "1.5. Postbellum Correspondence of Peter W. Hairston, 1879-1886." Folder 113

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968.

About 1750 items.

Chiefly letters sent from Peter W. Hairston Jr. and Nelson G. Hairston during the period when Peter attended law school at the University of North Carolina and Nelson attended prep school at Virginia Episcopal School and college at the University of North Carolina. These often affectionate letters were sent to their parents, Peter Wilson Hairston and Margaret George Hairston. Major subjects include grades, exams, descriptions of their schools and the surrounding communities, family news, and plans for upcoming vacations.

There are also many letters from Peter and Nelson during their service in World War II, in which they were both stationed abroad. They describe some of their experiences, and also their feelings following their father's death in 1943.

Following the war, both sons (and later their wives) continued to correspond with their mother, describing their jobs and families. Nelson and his family lived in the Phillipines for a period in the early 1950s, while Nelson worked for the World Health Organization, and he sent letters from there.

Among Peter and Nelson's letters are scattered letters from other family members and friends, also sent to Peter W. Hairston and Margaret Hairston.

Folder 114

1914-1930 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 114

Folder 115-118

Folder 115

Folder 116

Folder 117

Folder 118

1931 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 115-118

Folder 119-122

Folder 119

Folder 120

Folder 121

Folder 122

1932 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 119-122

Folder 123-125

Folder 123

Folder 124

Folder 125

1933 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 123-125

Folder 126-128

Folder 126

Folder 127

Folder 128

1934 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 126-128

Folder 129-132

Folder 129

Folder 130

Folder 131

Folder 132

1935 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 129-132

Folder 133-135

Folder 133

Folder 134

Folder 135

1936 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 133-135

Folder 136-138

Folder 136

Folder 137

Folder 138

1937 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 136-138

Folder 139-141

Folder 139

Folder 140

Folder 141

1938 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 139-141

Folder 142-145

Folder 142

Folder 143

Folder 144

Folder 145

1939 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 142-145

Folder 146-148

Folder 146

Folder 147

Folder 148

1940 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 146-148

Folder 149

1941-1942 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 149

Folder 150-151

Folder 150

Folder 151

1943 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 150-151

Folder 152-158

Folder 152

Folder 153

Folder 154

Folder 155

Folder 156

Folder 157

Folder 158

1944 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 152-158

Folder 159-161

Folder 159

Folder 160

Folder 161

1945 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 159-161

Folder 162

1946-1949 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 162

Folder 163

1950-1953 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 163

Folder 164

1954 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 164

Folder 165

1955 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 165

Folder 166

1956 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 166

Folder 167

1957 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 167

Folder 168

1958-1959 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 168

Folder 169

1960-1961 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 169

Folder 170

1962, 1968 #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 170

Folder 171

Undated, 1930s-1940s #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 171

Folder 172-174

Folder 172

Folder 173

Folder 174

Undated #00299, Subseries: "1.6. Other Hairston Family Letters, 1914-1968." Folder 172-174

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.5. Civil War and Postbellum Papers of Peter W. Hairston, 1864, 1875.

2 items.

Two financial documents: a "Schedule of Stamp Duties" effected in 1864, and an account statement from Herbert, Hairston, & Co., Peter W. Hairston's commission merchant business.

Folder 175

1864, 1875 #00299, Subseries: "2.5. Civil War and Postbellum Papers of Peter W. Hairston, 1864, 1875." Folder 175

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.6. Other Hairston Family Papers, 1937-1939 and undated.

About 25 items.

Bank statements and cancelled checks belonging to Nelson Hairston and Mr. and Mrs. Elmer G. Hairston.

Folder 176

1937-1939 and undated #00299, Subseries: "2.6. Other Hairston Family Papers, 1937-1939 and undated." Folder 176

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3. Other Loose Papers, 1913-1956 and undated.

About 50 items.

Family papers including clippings about and collected by the Hairstons; materials belonging to Peter W. Hairston Jr., including a birth announcement, speech about the Southern tradition, and description of the incident that earned him a bronze star; photographs of the Hairston family and unidentified people and buildings; an undated handwritten poem; and a two-starred flag which hung at Cooleemee Plantation while Peter W. Hairston Jr. and Nelson G. Hairston were serving in World War II.

Folder 177

Clippings, 1956 and undated #00299, Subseries: "3. Other Loose Papers, 1913-1956 and undated." Folder 177

Folder 178

Peter Hairston Jr. materials, 1913-1944 #00299, Subseries: "3. Other Loose Papers, 1913-1956 and undated." Folder 178

Image P-299/7-13

P-299/7

P-299/8

P-299/9

P-299/10

P-299/11

P-299/12

P-299/13

Photographs #00299, Subseries: "3. Other Loose Papers, 1913-1956 and undated." P-299/7-13

Folder 179

Poem, undated #00299, Subseries: "3. Other Loose Papers, 1913-1956 and undated." Folder 179

Folder 180

World War II flag #00299, Subseries: "3. Other Loose Papers, 1913-1956 and undated." Folder 180

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Items Separated

Oversize Papers (OP-299/1)

Oversize Volumes (SV-299/4-6,10, and 14)

Photographs (P-299/1-13)

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Processing Information

Processed by: Ellen R. Strong, Jill D. Snider, Danielle Allen, Valerie Gillispie, 1964, 1991, October 2005

Encoded by: Valerie Gillispie, October 2005

This collection was rehoused under the sponsorship of a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Office of Preservation, Washington, D.C., 1990-1992.

Processing Note: The Addition of October 2004 is arranged in the same way as, but has not been incorporated into, the original deposit of materials.

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