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Collection Number: 04045-z

Collection Title: Catherine E. Hanes Papers, 1861-1873

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the section for more information.


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Size 68 items (0.0 linear feet)
Abstract Catherine E. Hanes of Davie County, N.C., was the daughter of Alexander Martin Hanes and Jane M. Hanes. The collection includes personal letters to Catherine E. Hanes from her brother, Jacob H. Hanes, with the 4th North Carolina Regiment, 1861-1864, and a cousin, Ben Chaffin, with Confederate troops in Georgia and South Carolina, 1861, about mutual friends and military activities; a letter about the execution of a deserter, 1863; letters, 1863-1872, from her sister, Mary Hanes Davis, in Davie County, N.C., concerning family and community affairs, especially clothes being made and purchased and the effect of General W. T. Sherman's troops on the area; family letters, 1860s-1870s, from Lizzie March, a cousin in Lincoln County, Tenn.; and letters, 1869-1870, from Catherine's brother, John Wesley Hanes, about life at Trinity College, Randolph County, N.C., where he was a student.
Creator Hanes, Catherine E., fl. 1861-1873.
Language English.
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Restrictions to Access
No restrictions. Open for research.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the Catherine E. Hanes Papers #4045-z, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Alternate Form of Material
Microfilm copy (filmed October 2003) available.
  • Reel 1: folders 1-5
Provenance
Received from Frank Borden Hanes of Winston-Salem, N.C., in December 1978.
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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Catherine E. Hanes was the daughter of Alexander Martin Hanes (who appears to have died before 1861) and Jane M. Hanes of Fulton, Davie County, N.C. She attended Statesville Female Academy in 1863 and Salem Academy in 1864 and 1865. After 1865, she appears to have returned to the family home in Fulton and to have taught school nearby.

Catherine Hanes's siblings included Jacob H. Hanes, who served in the 4th North Carolina Regiment in the Confederate Army and was killed in May 1864; George Hanes, who enlisted in the 42nd N.C. Regiment in April 1864 and was killed in June 1864; Spencer Hanes, who was severely wounded in 1864 and returned home for the duration of the war; Mary Hanes, also called Mollie; and John Wesley Hanes, who was a student at Trinity College, Randolph County, N.C., in 1869-1870. Catherine Hanes was also addressed as Kate, Katie, or Sissie.

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Personal letters to Catherine E. Hanes in Davie County, N.C., from her brother, Jacob H. Hanes, with the 4th North Carolina Regiment, 1861-1864, and a cousin, Ben Chaffin, with Confederate States of America troops in Georgia and South Carolina, 1861, about mutual friends and military activities; a letter about the execution of a deserter, 1863; letters, 1863-1872, from her sister, Mary Hanes Davis, in Davie County, N.C., concerning family and community affairs, especially clothes being made and purchased and the effect of General W. T. Sherman's troops on the area; family letters, 1860s-1870s, from Lizzie March, a cousin in Lincoln County, Tenn.; and letters, 1869-1870, from Catherine's brother, John Wesley Hanes, about life at Trinity College, Randolph County, N.C., where he was a student.

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Contents list

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Papers, 1861-1873 and undated.

68 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Letters to Catherine Hanes from her brother, Jacob H. Hanes, with the 4th North Carolina Regiment in Garysburg, N.C., and Manassas Junction, Gordonsville, Rapidan River, and Brandy Station, Va., give news of friends, daily life and work in the regiment, including work apprehending blockade runners in January 1862. In a letter, September 1863, from J. H. Hanes to an unidentified brother, Hanes described an execution for desertion and attacked W. W. Holden and the Raleigh Standard.

In five letters, May-November 1864, Kate Hanes's cousin, Ben Chaffin, who was with the Confederate army at Dallas, Marietta, and Palmetto, Ga., and Tuscumbia, S.C., described encounters with federal forces and expressed the hope that the war would soon end so that he might return home.

Beginning in 1863, there are letters to Kate Hanes from her sister Mary and after 1864, this correspondence predominates. Mary Hanes's letters give news of daily life, relatives, mutual friends, neighborhood events and entertainments, plantation and church affairs, and her brother Spencer's convalescence; describe the effect of Confederate deserters on the neighborhood; give detailed, extensive descriptions of clothes being made or purchased; comment on Kate's education; express her longing for an end to the war; and describe the arrival of Sherman's soldiers in Davie County and their effect on the family and community.

After the end of the war and Mary Hanes's marriage, letters to Catherine from Mary discuss current fashions and clothes; daily life, especially her husband and children; relatives and mutual friends; neighborhood events in and around Smith Grove, Davie County, N.C.; entertainment; local politics; her husband's general store; and books and magazines. A detailed letter, December 1872, describes discharging a housekeeper and hiring a new one, with a description of the new housekeeper, her duties, and her wages.

Letters to Catherine Hanes from Lizzie March in Fayetteville, Tenn., give news of relatives and local life, with occasional comments on her teaching career.

Six letters, 1869-1870, to Catherine from her brother, John Wesley Hanes, a student at Trinity College, describe college life, including his classes, debating society, boarding house, and fellow students.

Folder 1

1861-1863 #04045-z, Series: "Papers, 1861-1873 and undated." Folder 1

Folder 2

1864-1865 #04045-z, Series: "Papers, 1861-1873 and undated." Folder 2

Folder 3

1866-1871 #04045-z, Series: "Papers, 1861-1873 and undated." Folder 3

Folder 4

1872-1873 #04045-z, Series: "Papers, 1861-1873 and undated." Folder 4

Folder 5

Undated #04045-z, Series: "Papers, 1861-1873 and undated." Folder 5

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