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Collection Number: 01431

Collection Title: Gustavus A. Henry Papers, 1804-1895

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the section for more information.


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Size 1.0 feet of linear shelf space (approximately 600 items)
Abstract Gustavus A. Henry (1804-1880) of Clarksville, Tenn., was a Whig politician, lawyer, and owner of plantations in Hinds County, Miss., and Desha County, Ark. Henry's family included his wife Marion McClure Henry (fl. 1828-1871); their children Susan (fl. 1846-1862), John (d. 1862), and Gustavus, Jr. (fl. 1849-1865); and Gustavus's brother Patrick Henry (fl. 1833-1850), plantation owner in Mississippi and Arkansas. The collection is chiefly family correspondence of the Henrys, particularly of Gustavus and Marion and their children. Included is correspondence between Gustavus and Marion while he was away on court business and campaigning in Tennessee for the Whigs and Henry Clay. Also included is their correspondence while he was on trips to visit his plantations in Mississippi and Arkansas. Gustavus wrote about the crops and slaves on his plantations. Marion wrote about friends and family in Clarksville and her work with the Mount Vernon Association. Letters from the children were written chiefly while they were away at school, particularly from Susan at the Columbia Female Institute in Tennessee, from John at the University of Virginia, and from Gustavus, Jr., at the Military Academy at West Point. They also corresponded while on trips with their father to Louisiana, Mississippi, and Arkansas; and Susan wrote while travelling in Virginia, New York, and the District of Columbia in 1853. Several of the Henry sons joined the Confederate Army during the Civil War, and Gustavus, Jr., served on the staff of General G. J. Pillow. In addition to family correspondence there are a few letters from political associates of Gustavus, including letters on the activities of John Bell. The earliest papers relate to Marion McClure Henry and her family before her marriage.
Creator Henry, Gustavus A. (Gustavus Adolphus), 1804-1880.
Language English
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Restrictions to Access
No restrictions. Open for research.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the Gustavus A. Henry Papers #1431, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Alternate Form of Material
All or part of this collection is available on microfilm from University Publciations of America as part of the Records of ante-bellum southern plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War, Series J.
Acquisitions Information
Received from Patrick Henry Cross of Clarksville, Tenn., in 1948, and from Mrs. M. L. Cross of Tennessee before January 1940.
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Biographical Information

Gustavus A. Henry (1804-1880) was born in Scott County, Ky., on 8 October 1804, and died in Clarksville, Tenn., on 10 September 1880. He moved to Christian County, Ky., at the age of fourteen. He attended Transylvania University and later studied law. He opened his law practice in Hopkinsville, Christian County, Ky., and in 1831 was elected to the Kentucky legislature. In February 1833, he married Marion McClure of Clarksville, Tenn., and soon after settled in Clarksville. He served Tennessee as a lawyer, orator, and Whig politician. In 1840, he was the Whig presidential elector for his congressional district, and, in 1844, 1848, and 1852, he campaigned in Tennessee on behalf of the Whig presidential nominees. He was defeated in 1843 when he ran for Congress against Cave Johnson, and, in 1853, when he sought election to the governorship with Andrew Johnson as his opponent. In 1851 and 1852, he was a member of the Tennessee legislature, and, in 1861, was elected to serve as senator in the Confederate Congress.

In addition to his political and legal activities, Henry operated cotton plantations in Mississippi and Arkansas. He did not live on the plantations, but he visited them annually and entrusted them in the meantime to overseers. The papers indicate that he purchased the Mississippi plantation in Hinds County sometime in 1835 or 1836, and the Arkansas plantation in Desha County on the Mississippi River in 1854.

The papers indicate that Gustavus Henry had at least six brothers: Patrick (fl. 1833-1850), who owned plantations in Mississippi and Arkansas and whose first wife was Elizabeth (d. ca. 1839), and his second Bettie (fl. 1850); William; James; Thomas; Daniel, who lived in Kentucky; and John F., who lived in Bloomington, and later in Burlington, Ill., and whose wife was Lucy.

Marion McClure Henry (fl. 1828-1871) was the daughter of Susan and Hugh McClure (d. 1828). An undated note in the collection addressed by Marion to her mother as "Mrs. Susan Kane" shows that the latter married a second time. Marion had a sister named Eliza (fl. 1835-1836), who was married to Walter Drane, and a brother, James B. McClure (fl. 1828-1837), who also lived in Clarksville. Sarah (1828-1833) and Thomas Frazer (1828-1833) (also spelled Frazier) of Clarksville were Marion's aunt and uncle.

Marion and Gustavus had six children: Susan (fl. 1846-1862), Thomas F. (1836-1858), John F. (d. 1862), Gustavus A. (fl. 1849-1865), Patrick (fl. 1857-1895), and Benjamin (d. ca. 1845). Benjamin apparently lived only a short time and died sometime late in 1844 or early in 1845. Susan married George D. Martin, a tobacco planter, in late 1854 or January 1855. Their children mentioned in the papers were Gus, Abe, and Marion.

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Chiefly correspondence of the Henry family, particularly of Gustavus A. Henry and Marion McClure Henry and their children. Included is correspondence between Gustavus and Marion while he was away on court business and campaigning in Tennessee for the Whig Party and Henry Clay. Also included is their correspondence while he was on trips to visit his plantations in Hinds County, Miss., and Desha County, Ark. Gustavus wrote about the crops and slaves on his plantations. Marion wrote about friends and family in Clarksville, Tenn., and her work with the Mount Vernon Association. Letters from the children were written chiefly while they were away at school, particularly from Susan Henry at the Columbia Female Institute in Tennessee, from John F. Henry (d. 1862) at the University of Virginia, and from Gustavus A. Henry, Jr., at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. They also corresponded while on trips with their father to Louisiana, Mississippi, and Arkansas, and Susan wrote while travelling in Virginia, New York, and the District of Columbia in 1853. Several of the Henry sons joined the Confederate Army during the Civil War, and Gustavus A. Henry, Jr., served on the staff of General G. J. Pillow. In addition to family correspondence, there are a few letters from political associates of Gustavus, including letters on the activities of John Bell. The earliest papers relate to Marion McClure Henry and her family before her marriage.

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Contents list

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 1. 1804-1832.

About 50 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Chiefly correspondence and other scattered papers of the McClure family of Clarksville, Tennessee. A few papers of Gustavus A. Henry are also included. This is the period before the marriage of Gustavus Henry and Marion McClure.

1804-1826 A few legal and business papers, including several bills of sale for slaves, of Hugh McClure and James Elder, who were partners in a merchandise firm.
1828 Several letters to James B. McClure, chiefly addressed to him at college in Nashville, Tenn., from his father, his mother, Marion, and his friends. His mother wrote (4 December 1828) about the plan for him to be a partner in the family store, and for Uncle and Aunt Frazier to live with them. The family business apparently included a store, a farm, and a tavern. Gustavus Henry of Hopkinsville, Ky., wrote to Thomas Frazer of Clarksville on 20 August 1828 about Frazer's claim against his brother's estate, state politics, and the national presidential election.
1829 Chiefly letters to and from James B. McClure, in school in Nashville, including correspondence with his mother and Marion about the family's business and activities in Clarksville. Also included is a love letter from James Hamilton of Nashville to Marion, and a letter from Gustavus Henry of Hopkinsville, Ky., to Thomas Frazer, concerning the settlement of Henry's brother's estate.
1830 Three invitations to members of the McClure family to social activities, and a letter to Marion from a suitor, Jos. B. Crockett of Hopkinsville, Ky.
1831 Chiefly letters to Marion from friends giving news of social activities, and two love letters addressed to her. Also included is a bill to Dr. Drane.
1832 Personal letters to Marion, including items from Eliza Baird, Thomas B. Criaghead, James Hamilton, Felix Catron, David Criaghead, and Gustavus A. Henry.
Folder 1

1804-1830 #01431, Series: "1. 1804-1832." Folder 1

Folder 2

1831-1832 #01431, Series: "1. 1804-1832." Folder 2

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 2. 1833-1847.

About 150 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Papers of the family of Gustavus and Marion Henry, chiefly correspondence between Gustavus and Marion while he was travelling on legal and political business, and making his annual visit to his plantation in Mississippi (usually in November and December).

1833 Included are several letters to Marion (now Mrs. Gustavus A. Henry) from friends. Also included is a letter from Patrick Henry (brother of Gustavus) in Hopkinsville, Ky., to Sarah Frazer, ordering dresses and hats for his wife and describing the reception of Gustavus and Marion by the town and his family. There is also a letter from Patrick in Clarksville to Gustavus in Hopkinsville in which Patrick gave advice on the latter's problem of whether to settle in Hopkinsville or Clarksville. There are letters from Gustavus and Patrick to Thomas Frazer discussing personal and legal business, and a letter to Gustavus from a nephew in Galena, Illinois. Gustavus wrote from Hopkinsville to Marion in Clarksville about his plan to move to Clarksville permanently.
1834 Correspondence between Marion in Clarksville and Fairfield, Tenn., and Gustavus in Hopkinsville, in which they discussed court business and personal news. Patrick Henry also wrote to Marion and Gustavus, advising the latter to buy a farm, describing his success as a planter, and asking Marion to order clothes for his wife.
1835 Included is a joint letter to Marion from Elizabeth and Patrick Henry of White Hall, Miss., discussing family and business matters and their purchase of a piece of land for Gustavus. Gustavus wrote from Hopkinsville to Marion in Clarksville about court business and work to be done at home. John F. Henry (1793-1873) wrote from Bloomington, Illinois, to Gustavus, mentioning politics, his sentiments on lynching, and railroad plans in Illinois. There is also a thank you note from A. T. Johnson to Marion and Elisa.
1836 Included is a letter to Elisa (probably Marion's sister who was married to Walter Drane) possibly from A. T. Johnson (the signature is torn) about old times in Clarksville, the crude and rough life in her new home, and the possibility of Dr. Drane selling Sugar Grove. Gustavus wrote Marion from Charlotte, Tenn., Dover, Tenn, and Hopkinsville about law cases, people he saw, the presidential election, and their property in Mississippi.
1837 Correspondence between Marion and Gustavus while he travelled to Dover, Hopkinsville, and Clinton, Miss. Among other topics, they discussed Gustavus's visit to his family in Kentucky and the death of his brother, the drinking and gambling of Marion's brother James, Gustavus's trip to their plantation in Mississippi, the health of the slaves, and state of the crops there. Also included is a letter from Lucy S.[?] Henry of Bloomington, Illinois, to Marion, and a letter from Patrick Henry of White Hall, Miss., to Gustavus, discussing the cotton crop.
1838 Three letters to Marion from Gustavus, in Charlotte and Dover, Tenn., in which he discussed court business and gave directions about farming activities at home.
1839 Correspondence between Marion and Gustavus, chiefly in November and December while he was on his trip to Mississippi. He discussed his travels, a visit to Patrick, hiring a new overseer, and settling the affairs of the slaves. Marion wrote about activities at home. Also included is a letter to Marion from Lucy S.[?] Henry giving news of her family and information on their new home in Illinois.
1840 A few letters from Gustavus to Marion, written during his travels through Tennessee campaigning for the Whigs. Also included is one letter from Marion to Gustavus, and several letters to him from Patrick describing his courting of a widow named Louisa, the cotton and corn crops in Mississippi, and his activities on behalf of the Whigs. (The papers indicate that Patrick's wife died sometime in the late 1830s and that his children were living with Marion and Gustavus.)
1841 Three letters to Marion from Gustavus, at Springfield and Dover, in which he discussed court business and the settlement of his brother Thomas Henry's estate. Also included is a memorandum of notes sent to Gustavus by Dr. B. Wilkins.
1842 Three letters from Gustavus to Marion written while he was away on court business.
1843 Correspondence between Marion and Gustavus, in which they discussed his travels across Tennessee making political speeches, the efforts to get him to run for the Senate and his desire not to do so, court business, his trip to Mississippi in December and the affairs of the plantation, and news of family and friends in Clarksville. Also included are items concerning the political campaign in July, such as letters from Edmund S.[?] Cheatham, Thomas Turner, and T. Cooney.
1844 Correspondence between Marion and Gustavus, chiefly concerning his campaign in Tennessee for Henry Clay from July through October. Also included are letters from W. Henry of Hopkinsville (20 July) concerning a financial transaction and politics, from Ro. L. Caruthers of Lebanon, Tenn., (14 August) discussing politics, and from a niece, S. C. Underwood of Bowling Green, Ky., to Gustavus concerning a family squabble.
1845 Letters from Gustavus in January while he was travelling on the Mississippi River in the same boat with Henry Clay, and in December while he was on another boat trip (in Vicksburg and on the Cumberland River) and again met up with Clay. James C. Henry wrote to his brother Gustavus about Patrick's desire to move to Texas, California, or some other Utopian country. Also included is a list of subscribers to Trinity Church (Episcopal) in Clarksville, and a statement from the Branch of the Bank of Tennessee in Clarksville to Gustavus, concerning a note on which he was an endorser.
1846 Correspondence between Marion and Gustavus in January, November, and December, while he was in Mississippi. Marion wrote about the children, friends, and politics. Gustavus wrote about friends, relatives, crop prospects, slaves, the overseer, the possibility of purchasing new land, politics, and their son Thomas F. Henry (called Tom), who accompanied him on the trip in November and December. Also included are a few letters from Susan and Thomas Henry, a letter from a friend in Hickory Flat, Miss., to Marion Henry, about the virtues of her move from Clarksville to Mississippi and news of friends and relatives (no signature), and a letter from John R. Harris, Henry's overseer in Mississippi, about crop prospects and plantation affairs.
1847 A group of miscellaneous items, including a carpenter's bill; a letter to Marion Henry from Mildred T.[?] Tyler concerning efforts to raise money for the church; a letter from Gustavus to Marion while on a business trip to Dover, Tenn.; an invitation to the funeral of George C. Boyd; a letter from James Erwin of Lexington, Ky., concerning land that Gustavus was interested in buying; and a Christmas note to Marion from a friend, James B. Reynolds.
Folder 3

1833 #01431, Series: "2. 1833-1847." Folder 3

Oversize Paper OP-1431/1

Circular, 1833 #01431, Series: "2. 1833-1847." OP-1431/1

Folder 4

1834-1836 #01431, Series: "2. 1833-1847." Folder 4

Folder 5

1837-1839 #01431, Series: "2. 1833-1847." Folder 5

Folder 6

1840-1843 #01431, Series: "2. 1833-1847." Folder 6

Folder 7

1844-1845 #01431, Series: "2. 1833-1847." Folder 7

Folder 8

1846-1847 #01431, Series: "2. 1833-1847." Folder 8

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 3. 1848-1860.

About 200 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Chiefly correspondence between members of the Henry family. Marion and Gustavus continued to correspond while he was away on trips, and they began to correspond with their children who were away at school and elsewhere.

1848 Chiefly Henry family letters, most of which are correspondence from September through December between Susan at the Columbia Female Institute in Columbia, Tenn., and her mother, father, and brothers. Lou Drane, her cousin, was in school with her, and Susan's letters discuss their activities, such as studies, social life, and living conditions, and contain messages to friends and family at home. Her family wrote about news at home and gave instructions for her behavior, study, and purchases of clothing. There are also a few letters from Gustavus to Marion. On 18 January, he wrote from Nashville, where he was at court, about a visit from Governor A. V. Brown, visiting old friends, and his plans to have portraits of himself and Marion painted. On 29 June, he wrote about his plans to return home from court business. On 21 and 26 August, he wrote from Columbia and Pulaski, Tenn., about a speaking tour and his debates with the Democrats. In December, he wrote while on his annual trip to his plantation in Mississippi about the crops, his desire to sell the plantation and buy a new one, dissatisfaction with the overseer due to ill treatment of slaves, and Patrick's family. Also included are a few business and political letters to Gustavus (11 February, 21 October, and 9 December), and a few personal letters from relatives and friends (18 October, 4 December, and 31 December).
1849 Continuing correspondence between Susan and members of the family from January through April. Among other topics, they mentioned the effects of cholera, setting up the telegraph in Clarksville, and seeing President Taylor. Gustavus wrote to Marion on 31 May and 21 July from Columbia about his speaking tour, and they corresponded in November and December while he was on a trip to Mississippi accompanied by Susan. There are a few letters to Marion from friends who had recently visited her, dated 8 and 29 March, in which they discussed the cholera epidemic and provided a recipe for treatment of the disease. There are a few financial and political letters to Gustavus, including one from Senator John Bell and one from Representative Balie Peyton, concerning his desire for appointment to a foreign mission. Also included are report cards for Gustavus A. and Thomas F. Henry at the Masonic University of Tennessee, and a bill for Susan's schooling expenses dated 3 June.
1850 Chiefly correspondence from October through November between members of the Henry family and Susan, who was at the Columbia Female Institute, and correspondence between Gustavus and Marion when he was in Nashville in October. Some of the other letters in 1850 are from other relatives, including Patrick and Bettie Henry in Mississippi, Fay Henry in Kentucky, and John F. Henry in Burlington, Illinois, in which they discussed the compromise proposals before Congress, President Taylor, Gustavus's plantation in Mississippi, and family news. There are scattered letters from friends, chiefly personal, including a letter dated 6 July from George W. Jones (Senator from Iowa) to Gustavus, in which he discussed his career, their old classmates, among whom were Jefferson Davis and David R. Atchison, and the compromise bill of 1850. James Lee, Jr., wrote to Gustavus on 20 October describing the University of North Carolina. Also included is a letter from Gustavus's overseer dated 16 June, and a letter from M.[?] W. McClure in San Francisco, Ca., to Bryce Stewart in Clarksville, describing his gold mining activities.
1851 Chiefly correspondence among members of the Henry family. Gustavus wrote while on trips to Nashville in January, November, and December, and on a trip to New Orleans, La., in March. His son Jack (John) accompanied him on the latter journey. Susan wrote while at the Columbia Female Institute in January and in Nashville in June. Thomas wrote while on a trip to Mammoth Cave in Kentucky in July. Also included is a funeral announcement for M. A. Martin of Clarksville, a letter from Patrick to Gustavus dated 23 April, and letters to the Henry family from friends. H.[?] M. Cummins wrote to Gustavus from Paris, Tenn., on 15 March, commenting on state politics, Whig plans for the coming state election, and his regret that Gustavus would not be the Whig nominee for governor.
1852 The family correspondence includes a letter Gustavus wrote from Nashville where he was attending the legislature in January, and letters of Gustavus, Marion, and Thomas, from August through October, while Gustavus was on a speech-making tour in Tennessee. Also included are letters to Gustavus from friends, chiefly on politics, and a letter to Susan from an admirer.
1853 Family letters include correspondence between Marion and Gustavus while he was on trips to Memphis, Tenn., New Orleans, La., and Mississippi in February and March, on a political tour of Tennessee while campaigning for governor in June and July, and in Nashville in October while seeking election to the Senate. Susan accompanied him on his trips to Memphis and New Orleans. Also included are letters from Susan while on a tour to Ohio, Kentucky, Virginia, Washington, and New York, from August through November, and letters to the Henrys from two people travelling in the party with Susan, Daniel K. Stewart and John Stewart Oxley. There are a few personal letters from friends to Marion and Gustavus, and letters dated 30 May and 4 June to Susan from Drane cousins in New Orleans and Glasgow, Mo. Gustavus wrote to J. O. Shackelford of Clarksville on 3 June telling him of his campaign for governor. On 24 September, Jo. C. Stark of Springfield, Tenn., wrote to Gustavus describing the obstacles in the way of his being elected to the Senate and the activities of [John?] Bell.
1854 1854: A few letters from Gustavus to Marion which he wrote while on a trip to Mississippi in April. He discussed his purchase of new lands in Arkansas, his slaves joining the Baptist church, and seeing friends and relatives, including his brother Dr. John F. Henry. Patrick wrote to Gustavus on 20 March and 15 June discussing plantation affairs and urging him to be in Mississippi for Dr. Henry's visit. There are several letters to Susan from friends and relatives, including one from George D. Martin, whom she later married, and a funeral notice for Norman Stewart, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bryce Stewart, dated 3 March.
1855 Chiefly letters from Gustavus to Marion while away in Mississippi in January and February, accompanied by Susan and her new husband, in Memphis at a railroad meeting in April, and at his new plantation at Henrico, Ark., in December, accompanied by Gustavus, Jr. While in Mississippi, he wrote about his plantation plans and Susan's activities. Also included is a letter, dated 8 February, from Susan to her mother, and a letter, dated 13 April, from George D. Martin to his wife, Susan, written from Nashville, where he had gone on business. An item dated 29 January mentioned the death of Johnnie, infant son of Bryce and Eliza Stewart.
1856 Family correspondence, with several letters from the Henry sons who were away at school. Gustavus wrote on 7 January and 14 December, while on trips to his new plantation, describing building new slave cabins, the activities of Gustavus, Jr. (Tade), his boat trip, and sending messages to Sue and her babies. Thomas F. Henry wrote in March and October from Lebanon, Tenn., where he was studying law, about his longing for home, his social and school life, his desire to go to Nashville in October and to hear speeches, and contacts with Judge and Mrs. Caruthers in Lebanon. John F. Henry wrote in September and October while at school at the University of Virginia, about his father's political actions and national politics, a trip to Monticello, Va., the activities of Tade and Thomas, and the Arkansas plantation.
1857 Chiefly family correspondence. There are letters from Gustavus, Jr., at school at West Point, from June through December, describing his schooling and drilling, a visit from General Winfield Scott, his promises in regard to drinking, and the necessity for him to leave the Military Academy in December because of deficiency in mathematics. John F. Henry wrote from the University of Virginia on 22 February, 8 March, 4 May, and 17 May about a trip he made to Washington, D.C., for the presidential inauguration, where he saw a number of national figures and visited Congress. He also commented on his father's farming activities and political life. On 26 July he wrote from Boston, Ma., describing his trip to Washington, New York, and Boston, accompanied by Thomas Drane and Walt Drane, and on 17 October he wrote from Cousin Jack's in the vicinity of his father's plantation. Thomas wrote from Washington and West Point in July, while on a trip with John, describing their travels, a visit with Governor [A. V.] Brown (formerly governor of Tennessee and at that time Postmaster General of the United States), and a visit with Gustavus at West Point. Gustavus wrote to Marion from the plantation in Arkansas on 21 March and November through December, describing his cotton gin, saw mill, corn mill, the activities of sons John and Patrick, who were with him, and the state of the crops, and giving directions to Gustavus, Jr., to come home from West Point. He noted on 13 December that Senator Robert Toombs of Georgia had purchased land near his in Arkansas. On 4 December, Marion wrote to Gustavus about her social activities and her work with the ladies in Clarksville in organizing work for the Mount Vernon Association.
1858 Included are a letter from Gustavus, Jr., in New York, to his mother, concerning his plans for returning home, a letter from W. G. Weatherford to Gustavus on legal business, and an authorization from Gustavus giving Thomas F. Henry power of attorney in connection with building a levee on his lands.
1859 Included are a letter from W. G. Brownlow of Knoxville, Tenn., to W. S. Cheatham, giving his opinion on his party's chances over the Democrats in the coming election and mentioning various politicians, and a letter from Jas. Minor Quarles of Clarksville to Pomp Marbly [?] in the same town, discussing his inability to be in Stewart before 31 July. Quarles was elected as a representative from Tennessee in 1859.
1860 Chiefly family letters. John F. Henry wrote from Memphis, on 5 January and 13 December, about his social life, the price of cotton, the scarcity of money, the sectional conflict and sentiments against abolitionists, news from his father in Arkansas, and about selling the old home in Clarksville. George D. Martin wrote to Susan on 4 February from New Orleans, describing the sale of his tobacco and social life in New Orleans, and sending messages to Marion and Abe, probably his children. Gustavus wrote Marion on 22 September from Nashville, on his way to Philadelphia and New York, about a speech he made, a conference with [John?] Bell, and giving advice on their new home. In November and December, Gustavus wrote from their plantation in Arkansas describing plantation activities and rebuilding the gin, which had burned. He wrote on 6 December about a recent trip to New Orleans to collect insurance on the gin and described a visit to the elegant new home of a friend named Greenfield. He mentioned secession talk and the failure of business houses in New Orleans, Charleston, Richmond, and New York due to the threat of secession. There are a few letters to Marion Henry from friends and from a niece, Flora Henry, and invitations to Gustavus to speak at a meeting of the Constitutional Union Party in Philadelphia (17 September) and to speak in a meeting in New Jersey (6 October).
Folder 9

January-October 1848 #01431, Series: "3. 1848-1860." Folder 9

Folder 10

November 1848-February 1849 #01431, Series: "3. 1848-1860." Folder 10

Folder 11

March-December 1849 #01431, Series: "3. 1848-1860." Folder 11

Folder 12

1850 #01431, Series: "3. 1848-1860." Folder 12

Folder 13

1851-1852 #01431, Series: "3. 1848-1860." Folder 13

Folder 14

1853 #01431, Series: "3. 1848-1860." Folder 14

Folder 15

1854-1856 #01431, Series: "3. 1848-1860." Folder 15

Folder 16

1857 #01431, Series: "3. 1848-1860." Folder 16

Folder 17

1858-1860 #01431, Series: "3. 1848-1860." Folder 17

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 4. 1861-1895.

About 25 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Chiefly family letters written during the Civil War when several of the Henry sons were serving in the Confederate Army. In addition to letters on military matters, there are a number of letters and other documents relating to the management of the plantation in Arkansas and family activities. There are only a few documents from after the Civil War, one of which is an article on the life of Gustavus A. Henry.

1861 Included are letters in January from Gustavus at the Arkansas plantation. Also included are letters from the following family members: John F. Henry wrote on 6 February and 26 May from Memphis, and from August through December from Confederate Army camps in Missouri and Kentucky. Gustavus, Jr., was on the staff of General G. J. Pillow and wrote in August from New Madrid, Mo., and on 1 November from Head Quarters 1st Div. George D. Martin wrote to Gustavus on financial matters on 26 September, and Patrick On Board Steamer Ky wrote to his brother Gustavus on 21 April. In these letters, family members discussed affairs at the plantation in Arkansas; plans of Gustavus, Jr., and John F. Henry for entry into the Confederate Army; opinions of Gustavus and Patrick on secession; and military experiences of Gustavus, Jr., and John F. in the Ohio River area of Missouri and Kentucky, including references to General Pillow and General U. S. Grant. In a letter dated 17 May, Gustavus wrote to Gustavus, Jr., about the procedure he should follow in getting a commission, and enclosed a letter of introduction for him to present to Jefferson Davis. In addition to these letters, there are a few miscellaneous items from friends and relatives on personal, political, legal, and financial matters; a letter dated 22 September from Gustavus's overseer; and a letter dated 14 November from F. A. Hannum of Clarksville to the governor of Tennessee, concerning the affairs of the military board of Clarksville.
1862 All the material in 1862 dates from January through June. Included is a letter to Gustavus from R. A. Parker of Memphis, concerning sending salt to the former's plantation; a letter concerning the candidacy of A. L. Edwards for Sergeant at Arms of the Confederate Senate; and a letter from John F. Henry to Gustavus concerning military action around Columbus, Ky., dated 22 January. Also included is a telegram, 28 April, from Gustavus, Jr., to General Patrick Henry, stating that Jack is sinking but little. In June, there are letters from Susan to her mother and from Marion Stewart to Gustavus concerning the death of Jack.
1865 Only two items are included for this year. The first is a brief note dated 21 April from G. A. Henry [Jr.] authorizing Captain Reid [?] to draw his pay for him. The second item is a copy of a letter dated 15 October from J. N. Thomas of Clarksville, to the president of Lexington Institute, asking if Patrick Henry of Clarksville was one of the students at the Institute who participated in the Battle of New Market.
1866 Two letters, dated 3 and 13 March, to Gustavus A. Henry from T. H. Smith of the Virginia Military Institute, regarding Patrick Henry's service in the Battle of New Market. He also discussed the affairs of the school and the plan to bring the remains of the boys who had died at New Market to the school for burial along with those of General Henry Lee.
1871 Included is a letter, dated 24 May, from E. T. Henry of Vicksburg, Miss., to Uncle Gus, asking him to give a photograph to Aunt Marion and thanking them for their kindness to him and his wife.
1895 Included is a reprint of an article in the Nashville American, dated 10 November 1895, written by John F. House, on the life of Gustavus A. Henry.
Folder 18

1861-1895 #01431, Series: "4. 1861-1895." Folder 18

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 5. Undated Material.

About 150 items.

Arrangement: by type.

Included in this series is some undated correspondence between Marion and Gustavus. Also included are a number of items relating to the effort in Tennessee to raise money to buy Mount Vernon, a project in which Marion Henry participated. Other items include a letter from James B. McClure; letters to Marion and Gustavus from nieces and cousins; letters to Marion from her mother and Sarah Frazer; and letters written to Marion, before her marriage, by friends, suitors, and Sally Frazer. There is some correspondence of Susan Henry, and a group of calling cards and invitations.

The miscellaneous items include recipes, notes from friends, poems, a bill, and two maps, one of lands owned by M. H. Howard along the Mississippi River, and one of a plat of a township in Desha County.

Folder 19-20

Folder 19

Folder 20

Undated correspondence between Gustavus A. and Marion Henry #01431, Series: "5. Undated Material." Folder 19-20

Folder 21

Undated fragments, including material on the Mount Vernon Association #01431, Series: "5. Undated Material." Folder 21

Folder 22-23

Folder 22

Folder 23

Miscellaneous undated Letters #01431, Series: "5. Undated Material." Folder 22-23

Folder 24

Calling cards and invitations #01431, Series: "5. Undated Material." Folder 24

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Processing Information

Processed by: E. Ryan, 1952, and edited by Shonra Newman, March 1991

Encoded by: Bari Helms, April 2005

Updated by: Kathryn Michaelis, November 2009

This inventory is an edited version of an inventory compiled in 1952 by E. Ryan, a member of the Southern Historical Collection staff.

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