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Collection Number: 00341-z

Collection Title: James Hogg Papers, 1772-1824 and undated

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the FAQ section for more information.


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Size 0.0 feet of linear shelf space (approximately 60 items)
Abstract James Hogg was a Scottish emigrant to Orange County, N.C., circa 1774. The collection consists primarily of legal documents, 1772-1773, of James Hogg in Scotland, connected with his efforts to identify and procure conviction of the persons who burned his home; papers, 1773-1774, relating to his efforts to emigrate to North Carolina, his negotiations for a ship to carry his family and other emigrants, the wreck of the ship off the Shetland Islands, the emigrants' controversy with Hogg, and his controversy in Scottish courts with the ship owners; and scattered papers, 1778-1824, of Hogg and his family after their settlement in Orange County, N.C., where Hogg became a prominent resident of Hillsborough. Undated papers include genealogical material.
Creator Hogg, James, 1729-1805.
Language English
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Restrictions to Access
No restrictions. Open for research.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the James Hogg Papers #341-z, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Alternate Form of Material
Microfilm copy (filmed 1978) available.
  • Reel 1: entire collection
Acquisitions Information
Deposits up until 1940 include gifts received from Laura Faucette, Mrs. Don Scott, the North Carolina Historical Society, and Rosina Mordecai, and purchases. Addition of 1970 was transferred from the Thomas Whiteside Papers #775.
Additional Descriptive Resources
The original finding aid is filed in folder 1.
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Biographical Information

James Hogg came to North Carolina from Scotland about the year 1774, and settled near Hillsborough, Orange County, N.C. He quickly became prominent in the community and during the Revolutionary War he sided with the Revolutionary party. His brother, Robert, a merchant of Wilmington, N.C., who had been in the colony for some time before James arrived, was a Loyalist during the Revolution and left North Carolina.

James Hogg had two sons, Walter and Gavin, whose surnames were changed to their mother's name of Alves. They moved to Kentucky. Hogg's daughter Elizabeth married John Huske of Wilmington, N.C.; his daughter Robina married William Norwood of Hillsborough, N.C.; and his daughter Helen first married William Hooper, the son of a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and then Joseph Caldwell, president of the University of North Carolina from 1804 to 1835.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Scope and Content

The collection consists primarily of legal documents, 1772-1773, of James Hogg (1729-1805) in Scotland, connected with his efforts to identify and procure conviction of the persons who burned his home; papers, 1773-1774, relating to his efforts to emigrate to North Carolina, his negotiations for a ship to carry his family and other emigrants, the wreck of the ship off the Shetland Islands, the emigrants' controversy with Hogg, and his controversy in Scottish courts with the ship owners; and scattered papers, 1778-1824, of Hogg and his family after they settled in Orange County, N.C., where Hogg became a prominent resident of Hillsborough, N.C. Undated papers include genealogical material.

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Contents list

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Papers, 1772-1824 and undated.

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Processing Information

Processed by: SHC Staff, 1944-1970

Encoded by: Nancy Kaiser, February 2006

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