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Collection Number: 00345

Collection Title: William Alexander Hoke Papers, 1750-1925

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the FAQ section for more information.


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Size 11.5 feet of linear shelf space (approximately 4200 items)
Abstract William Alexander Hoke, lawyer, legislator, and chief justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court, of Lincolnton, Lincoln County, N.C., was the son of John Franklin Hoke (1821-1888) and Catherine Wilson Alexander Hoke (d. 1857), brother of Nancy Childs Hoke (1856-1893) and Sallie Badger Hoke (d. 1914), husband of Mary McBee Hoke (d. 1920), and father of Mary Hoke Slaughter. The collection includes letters, financial and legal papers, genealogical papers, and other materials pertaining to William Alexander Hoke and members of the related Alexander, Henderson, McBee, and Wilson families. Included is material on 19th-century North Carolina politics; an antebellum gold mining operation; John Franklin Hoke's involvement in the Mexican-American War; slavery, including slave bills of sale; the service of family members and others in the Confederate army and navy; the homefront during the Civil War; problems of Reconstruction, including references to activities of the Ku Klux Klan; the legal career of William Alexander Hoke; the brief theatrical career of Laura Alexander in the 1870s; and Sallie Badger Hoke's travels to Europe and Egypt in the 1880s. Also included a notebook belonging to H. T. Guion with records of the North Carolina State Troops, Company B, 1st Regiment Artillery, North Carolina land records dating back to the 1750s, and legal documents and financial items relating to family members. Correspondents include North Carolina Governor David L. Swain; Frances Christine Fisher Tiernan, the novelist who wrote as Christian Reid; Zebulon Vance; and Josephus Daniels.
Creator Hoke, William Alexander, 1851-1925.
Language English
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Restrictions to Access
No restrictions. Open for research.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the William Alexander Hoke Papers #345, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Acquisitions Information
Received from Mrs. M. J. Slaughter and Mary Deaton before 1940.
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Biographical Information

William Alexander Hoke, lawyer, legislator and chief justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court, was born 25 October 1851 in Lincolnton, N.C. His father, John Franklin Hoke (1821-1888), fought in the Mexican-American War, served as adjutant general of North Carolina by appointment of Governor John Ellis in 1861, and later, as a colonel, commanded the Thirteenth and, subsequently, Twenty-third North Carolina regiments of the Confederate Army. William Alexander Hoke's mother was Catherine Wilson Alexander Hoke (d. 1857), and he had two sisters, Nancy Childs Hoke (1856-1893) and Sallie Badger Hoke (d. 1914).

Educated at the Lincolnton Male Academy, Hoke later studied law under North Carolina Chief Justice Richmond M. Pearson and was admitted to the bar on 25 October 1872. After practicing law for eight years in Shelby, N.C., he returned to Lincolnton and joined his father in a law partnership, which lasted until John Franklin Hoke's death in 1888. A lifelong Democrat, Alex Hoke, as he was known, represented Lincoln County in the state legislature in 1889 and was elected a state Superior Court judge the following year. He remained a trial judge until 1904 when he was elected an associate justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court. Reelected in 1912 and 1920, he was appointed chief justice on 2 June 1924, succeeding Walter Clark upon his death. Hoke was elected chief justice in November 1924, but resigned on 16 March 1925 because of poor health. He held the status of an emergency judge until his death on 13 September 1925.

The judicial opinions of Justice Hoke appear in 53 volumes of the Supreme Court Reports (#137-#189 inclusive) and deal with a wide range of subjects. In particular, several Supreme Court decisions prepared by Hoke show his mastery of the law of real property. In Hicks v. Manufacturing Co. (138 N.C), Hoke wrote the decision that settled questions of assumption of risk and contributory negligence as affected by the negligence of a master or employer. He also wrote significant decisions concerning other matters of civil law, such as contracts, wills, conveyances, notes, and various suits in equity.

A friend of Zebulon B. Vance, North Carolina governor and United States senator, Hoke took great pride in his work chairing the commission to provide a statue of Vance for Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol. He received honorary doctor of law degrees from the University of North Carolina and Davidson College and was a member of the Society of the Cincinnati.

On 16 December 1897, Hoke married Mary (Mamie) McBee of Lincolnton, who died in 1920. Their only child, Mary, survived both parents and later married Edward Slaughter of Charlottesville, Va.

(Adapted from the biographical note by Walser H. Allen Jr., in the Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, Volume III, 1988.)

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Scope and Content

The papers of William Alexander Hoke, lawyer, legislator, and chief justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court, of Lincolnton, N.C., include letters, financial and legal papers, genealogical papers, and other materials pertaining to Hoke and members of the related Alexander, Henderson, McBee, and Wilson families. Included is material on 19th-century North Carolina politics; an antebellum gold mining operation; John Franklin Hoke's involvement in the Mexican-American War; slavery, including slave bills of sale; the service of family members and others in the Confederate army and Confederate navy; the homefront during the Civil War; problems of Reconstruction, including references to activities of the Ku Klux Klan; the legal career of William Alexander Hoke; the brief theatrical career of Laura Alexander in the 1870s; and Sallie Badger Hoke's travels to Europe and Egypt in the 1880s. Also included are North Carolina land records dating back to the 1750s, as well as legal documents and financial items relating to family members. Correspondents include North Carolina Governor David L. Swain; Frances Christine Fisher Tiernan, the novelist who wrote as Christian Reid; Zebulon Vance; and Josephus Daniels.

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Contents list

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series Quick Links

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 1. Correspondence and Related Items, 1791-1925.

About 3100 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Letters and related materials of William Alexander Hoke and members of the Hoke, Alexander, Wilson, and related families.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.1. 1791-1838.

32 items.

Chiefly family correspondence and some business letters. Most of the family letters are those of Elizabeth Henderson Alexander and her brothers, Leonard Henderson (North Carolina Supreme Court chief justice, 1829-1833) and Archibald Henderson (member of Congress, 1799-1803). Business correspondence mainly consists of letters between J. H. Bissell and Kemp P. Willis.

Folder 1

1790s #00345, Subseries: "1.1. 1791-1838." Folder 1

Folder 2

1800-1835 #00345, Subseries: "1.1. 1791-1838." Folder 2

Folder 3

1836-1838 #00345, Subseries: "1.1. 1791-1838." Folder 3

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.2. 1840-1869.

About 250 items.

Correspondence primarily about John Franklin Hoke and his activities, although there are also numerous items relating to the Alexander family, especially Elvira Catherine Wilson Alexander, Joseph Wilson Alexander, William Lee Alexander, Laura Alexander, and Mary Josephine (Coosa) Wilson. In addition to family matters, topics include politics, the Mexican-American War, the removal of Cherokees from North Carolina, and the Civil War. Correspondents who were not family members include Milledge Luke Bonham, Charles Fisher, Maxcy Gregg, Joseph Lane, Levi Silliman Ives, and Eleanor Swain, wife of North Carolina Governor David L. Swain.

Many letters relate to political matters of the period including banking issues, November 1840; President John Tyler's use of the veto, 22 September 1841; local party politics, December 1841, 10 February 1842, 25 October 1852, 8 April and 6 July 1855; the southern convention movement, 21 August and 25 September 1850, 7 March 1851; the Kansas-Nebraska Act, 8 July 1854; and the raid on Harper's Ferry, 18 November 1859. Catherine Wilson Alexander Hoke mentioned the visit of Hungarian nationalist Louis Kossuth to the United States and noted that her sister "talks of little else" (18 November 1852).

In 1847, several items deal with John Franklin Hoke's military service during the Mexican-American War, including lists of recruits in Lincolnton, N.C., and St. Louis, Mo., as well as letters denying charges of cowardice against him. After the war, J. F. Hoke corresponded with United States Treasury Department auditors about army provisions for which he had been responsible as a military officer (e.g., 27 January and 23 February 1850, 17 January and 17 March 1851). At the same time, Hoke also sought an army commission for which he was endorsed by M. L. Bonham, who had been Hoke's superior officer in Mexico and later represented South Carolina in Congress (25 February 1851).

Materials relating to Levi Silliman Ives, North Carolina's antebellum Episcopal bishop whose conversion to Roman Catholicism stirred great controversy in the state, include letters dated 3 June 1850, 23 February 1852, 9 May 1854, and several undated items from the 1850s.

Several letters in 1857 relate to the removal of Cherokees from North Carolina, specifically with J. F. Hoke's efforts to obtain a federal contract to handle the removal. See 28 April, 4 May, 6 May, 19 May, 3 September, and 25 November 1857.

The Civil War figures prominently in this subseries. J. F. Hoke's service as North Carolina adjutant general is documented in 1861 items that include communications with North Carolina Governor John Ellis (especially in June) and receipts for weapons. He later served as colonel in the 13th and 23rd North Carolina regiments. Most of the Civil War material, however, concerns the Alexander family. Joseph Wilson Alexander, a United States Navy officer circa 1857-1861, and his brother, William Lee Alexander, both served in the Confederate military.

J. W. Alexander, who predicted trouble when he heard of Lincoln's 1860 election while in port at Gibraltar (see 30 November 1860), resigned his commission and joined the Confederate Navy. His letters recount his experiences as a prisoner of war in New England (e.g., 13 September 1863, December 1863, 7 August 1864, and file of undated 1861-1865) and his return to active duty following a prisoner exchange (e.g., 9 November 1864). Occasional letters throughout the war touch on William Lee Alexander's activities with the Confederate Army in Texas, where he had moved before the war to serve as president of the University of Nacogdoches (about which see 25 October and 20 December 1859, and 9 February 1860). Elvira Catherine Wilson Alexander, mother of these two military officers, observed during the war, "I believe this war will last just five years longer, so we may rest alone on our Heavenly Father--no other help may be expected, and no other will avail and we are to be taught until we have learned our lesson of [illegible] and trust as we ought" (undated 1861-1865). As the war came to a close, C. W. Read tried to obtain a wagon from J. W. Alexander so that he and a group of Confederates could evade Sherman and make it to the Trans-Mississippi West (20 February 1865). Also included here is a notebook (V-345/2) belonging to H. T. Guion with records of the North Carolina State Troops, Company B, 1st Regiment Artillery.

Folder 4

1840-1846 #00345, Subseries: "1.2. 1840-1869." Folder 4

Folder 5

1847-1849 #00345, Subseries: "1.2. 1840-1869." Folder 5

Folder 6

1850-1853 #00345, Subseries: "1.2. 1840-1869." Folder 6

Folder 7

1854-1859 #00345, Subseries: "1.2. 1840-1869." Folder 7

Folder 8

1860 #00345, Subseries: "1.2. 1840-1869." Folder 8

Folder 9-10

Folder 9

Folder 10

1861, including V-234/S1 #00345, Subseries: "1.2. 1840-1869." Folder 9-10

Volume is J. W. Alexander's account of his voyage on the U.S.S. Germantown from Norfolk, Va., to various Asian ports, 1857-1860.

Folder 11

1862-1863 #00345, Subseries: "1.2. 1840-1869." Folder 11

Folder 12

1864-1866 #00345, Subseries: "1.2. 1840-1869." Folder 12

Folder 12a

1861-1865 #00345, Subseries: "1.2. 1840-1869." Folder 12a

Folder 12b

V-345/2 #00345, Subseries: "1.2. 1840-1869." Folder 12b

Notebook belonging to H. T. Guion with records of the North Carolina State Troops, Company B, 1st Regiment Artillery., including lists of recruits, copies of orders, and notes on activities. The earliest entries in the notebook begin on page 16; pages 5-15, which cover July 1864-February 1865, are a continuation from the back of the notebook.

Folder 13

1867-1869 #00345, Subseries: "1.2. 1840-1869." Folder 13

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.3. 1870-1925.

About 2500 items.

Correspondence and other materials primarily related to William Alexander Hoke, his family, and career as a lawyer and jurist, and also to the legal practice of John Franklin Hoke until his death in 1888. Many of the items are family letters to and from William Alexander Hoke, his wife, Mary McBee (Mamie) Hoke (d. 1920), and his two sisters, Sallie Badger Hoke (d. 1914) and Nancy Childs (Nannie) Hoke (d. 1893). Materials relating to Sallie Badger Hoke's trip to Europe and Egypt, 1888-1889, are also included. Much family correspondence comes from the period when Sallie Badger Hoke worked for a New Jersey judge, circa 1899-1913. Nancy Childs Hoke carried on a correspondence with Frances Christine Fisher Tiernan, the novelist who wrote as Christian Reid (e.g., January-April 1880) and Florence and Zebulon Vance (e.g., 20 October 1889, 7 and 17 June 1891, and 8 November 1892).

Correspondents not in William Alexander Hoke's immediate family include Charles Aycock, Victor C. Barringer, Locke Craig, Josephus Daniels, George Davis (Confederate attorney general), Robert F. Hoke, and Hoke Smith. Topics include William Alexander Hoke's law practice, his campaign for judge in 1890, his possible candidacy for the state Supreme Court and the United States Senate in 1902, his elevation to the state's high court in 1904, and his subsequent re-elections.

Other topics include Reconstruction, notably letters regarding abuse of individuals by "disloyal organizations" in Lincoln County, N.C. (23 January 1871; also see 17 October and 20 December 1870), and various mentions of the Ku Klux Klan by name (e.g., 6 April 1872 and 18 June 1874). During this period, A. G. Smith wrote to William Alexander Hoke from Alabama that "all our boys, nearly" had gone to Texas or Mexico to avoid "the d--n U.S. marshals" (14 April 1872).

Laura Alexander's brief theatrical career in New York, which was cut short by her sudden death in 1874, is the subject of several letters in the early 1870s.

Folder 14

1870-1871 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 14

Folder 14a

V-345/3 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 14a

Five-page notebook written in German and datelined "Nov. Dec. 2, 1871" in Catonsville, Md.

Folder 15

1872-1873 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 15

Folder 16

1874 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 16

Folder 17

1875 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 17

Folder 18

1876 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 18

Folder 19

1877 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 19

Folder 20

1878 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 20

Folder 21

1879 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 21

Folder 21a

V-345/4 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 21a

Notes on expenses, 1873-1879.

Folder 21b

V-345/5 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 21b

Commodities with prices on 14 January and 24 April 1879.

Folder 22

1870s undated #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 22

Folder 23-24

Folder 23

Folder 24

1880 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 23-24

Folder 25

1881 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 25

Folder 26-27

Folder 26

Folder 27

1882 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 26-27

Folder 28

1883 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 28

Folder 29

1884 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 29

Folder 30

1885-1886 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 30

Folder 31

1887 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 31

Folder 32-37

Folder 32

Folder 33

Folder 34

Folder 35

Folder 36

Folder 37

1888 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 32-37

Folder 38-40

Folder 38

Folder 39

Folder 40

1889 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 38-40

Folder 40a

V-345/6 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 40a

Includes notes on a speech about religion, apparently delivered by William Alexander Hoke while a member of the North Carolina legislature in 1889.

Folder 41

1880s undated #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 41

Folder 42-43

Folder 42

Folder 43

1890 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 42-43

Folder 44

1891-1892 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 44

Folder 44a

V-345/7 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 44a

Copy of a pamphlet entitled "Narrative of the Battle of Cowan's Ford ... and Narrative of the Battle of Kings Mountain," concerning two Revolutionary War battles. Zebulon Vance sent William Alexander Hoke this pamphlet, which is dated 28 March 1891.

Folder 45-48

Folder 45

Folder 46

Folder 47

Folder 48

1893 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 45-48

Folder 49

1894-1896 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 49

Folder 50-53

Folder 50

Folder 51

Folder 52

Folder 53

1897 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 50-53

Folder 54-58

Folder 54

Folder 55

Folder 56

Folder 57

Folder 58

1898 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 54-58

Folder 59-64

Folder 59

Folder 60

Folder 61

Folder 62

Folder 63

Folder 64

1899 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 59-64

Folder 65-69

Folder 65

Folder 66

Folder 67

Folder 68

Folder 69

1900 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 65-69

Folder 70-77

Folder 70

Folder 71

Folder 72

Folder 73

Folder 74

Folder 75

Folder 76

Folder 77

1901 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 70-77

Folder 78-84

Folder 78

Folder 79

Folder 80

Folder 81

Folder 82

Folder 83

Folder 84

1902 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 78-84

Folder 85-89

Folder 85

Folder 86

Folder 87

Folder 88

Folder 89

1903 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 85-89

Folder 90-99

Folder 90

Folder 91

Folder 92

Folder 93

Folder 94

Folder 95

Folder 96

Folder 97

Folder 98

Folder 99

1904 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 90-99

Folder 100-105

Folder 100

Folder 101

Folder 102

Folder 103

Folder 104

Folder 105

1905 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 100-105

Folder 106-108

Folder 106

Folder 107

Folder 108

1906 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 106-108

Folder 109-112

Folder 109

Folder 110

Folder 111

Folder 112

1907 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 109-112

Folder 113-116

Folder 113

Folder 114

Folder 115

Folder 116

1908 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 113-116

Folder 117-119

Folder 117

Folder 118

Folder 119

1909 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 117-119

Folder 120

1900-1909 undated #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 120

Folder 121

1910 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 121

Folder 122-123

Folder 122

Folder 123

1911 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 122-123

Folder 124

1912 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 124

Folder 125

1913 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 125

Folder 126-132

Folder 126

Folder 127

Folder 128

Folder 129

Folder 130

Folder 131

Folder 132

1914 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 126-132

Folder 133

1915-1919 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 133

Folder 134

1910s undated #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 134

Folder 135-144

Folder 135

Folder 136

Folder 137

Folder 138

Folder 139

Folder 140

Folder 141

Folder 142

Folder 143

Folder 144

1920 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 135-144

Folder 145

1923-1924 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 145

Folder 146-147

Folder 146

Folder 147

1925 #00345, Subseries: "1.3. 1870-1925." Folder 146-147

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915.

About 320 items.

Undated letters, arranged by correspondent. Most of the files are organized by recipient, though some are by the sender and are so designated.

Folder 148

Alexander, Elvira Catherine Wilson #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 148

Folder 149

Alexander, Elvira Catherine Wilson (sender) #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 149

Folder 150

Alexander, Daisy #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 150

Folder 151

Alexander, Laura #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 151

Folder 152

Alexander, Laura (sender) #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 152

Folder 153

Alexander, Joseph Wilson #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 153

Folder 154

Alexander, William Lee #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 154

Folder 155

Chase, Ellen #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 155

Folder 156

Hoke, Catherine Wilson Alexander (sender) #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 156

Folder 157

Hoke, John Franklin #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 157

Folder 158

Hoke, John Franklin (sender) #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 158

Folder 159

Hoke, Mary McBee #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 159

Folder 160

Hoke, Mary McBee (sender) #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 160

Folder 161

Hoke, Nancy Childs #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 161

Folder 162

Hoke, Nancy Childs (sender) #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 162

Folder 163-164

Folder 163

Folder 164

Hoke, Sallie Badger #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 163-164

Folder 165

Hoke, Sallie Badger (sender) #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 165

Folder 166

Hoke, William Alexander #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 166

Folder 167

Hoke, William Alexander (sender) #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 167

Folder 168

McBee, Mary Elizabeth Sumner #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 168

Folder 169

Tiernan, Frances Christine Fisher (sender) #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 169

Folder 170

Wilson, Mary Josephine #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 170

Folder 171

Wilson, Mary Josephine (sender) #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 171

Folder 172

Unknown recipient #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 172

Folder 173

Miscellaneous items #00345, Subseries: "1.4. Undated Correspondence and Related Materials, circa 1840-1915." Folder 173

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 2. Financial and Legal Items, 1802-1924.

About 750 items.

Arrangement: by type of material.

Financial items, legal materials and land records relating to William Alexander Hoke and his family. See Series 1 for related correspondence.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.1. Bills, Receipts, and Other Financial Items, 1802-1915.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.2. Legal Materials, 1802-1924.

About 250 items.

Arrangement: chronological

Notes, briefs, wills, subpoenas and other legal papers, most of which pertain to the legal career of John Franklin Hoke or, beginning in the 1870s, to that of William Alexander Hoke. Documents include J. F. Hoke's bar admission signed by North Carolina Supreme Court members (16 June 1842), an affidavit of Mary Murphy Dickson in connection with a Revolutionary War pension (27 April 1846), and a copy of the will of Florence (Mrs. Zebulon) Vance (24 May 1891).

Folder 183

1802-1808 #00345, Subseries: "2.2. Legal Materials, 1802-1924." Folder 183

Folder 184

1827-1839 #00345, Subseries: "2.2. Legal Materials, 1802-1924." Folder 184

Folder 185

1842-1859 #00345, Subseries: "2.2. Legal Materials, 1802-1924." Folder 185

Folder 186

1860-1869 #00345, Subseries: "2.2. Legal Materials, 1802-1924." Folder 186

Folder 187

1870-1874 #00345, Subseries: "2.2. Legal Materials, 1802-1924." Folder 187

Folder 188

1875 #00345, Subseries: "2.2. Legal Materials, 1802-1924." Folder 188

Folder 189

V-345/8 #00345, Subseries: "2.2. Legal Materials, 1802-1924." Folder 189

Includes William Alexander Hoke's notes on the "County Court lectures of Chief Justice Pearson" (circa 1871) and information on business accounts and notes on judgments in various cases from Hoke's early law practice.

Folder 190

1876-1879 #00345, Subseries: "2.2. Legal Materials, 1802-1924." Folder 190

Folder 191

1880-1886 #00345, Subseries: "2.2. Legal Materials, 1802-1924." Folder 191

Folder 192

1887-1889 #00345, Subseries: "2.2. Legal Materials, 1802-1924." Folder 192

Folder 193

1890-1899 #00345, Subseries: "2.2. Legal Materials, 1802-1924." Folder 193

Folder 194

1901-1911 #00345, Subseries: "2.2. Legal Materials, 1802-1924." Folder 194

Folder 195

V-345/9 #00345, Subseries: "2.2. Legal Materials, 1802-1924." Folder 195

Hoke's brief notes on the judicial terms, Fall 1918-Spring 1921.

Folder 196

V-345/10 #00345, Subseries: "2.2. Legal Materials, 1802-1924." Folder 196

Hoke's brief notes on the judicial terms, Fall 1921-Fall 1924.

Folder 197

Undated #00345, Subseries: "2.2. Legal Materials, 1802-1924." Folder 197

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.3. Land Records, 1750-1911.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.4. Financial and Legal Volume, 1824-1830.

1 item.

Deeds, indentures, surveys, rent agreements, and other materials relating to landholdings and land transactions in North Carolina, mostly in Lincoln and surrounding counties. Included are an 1821 town plot of Lincolnton and an 1829 list of taxable property for John Hoke (presumably the father of John Franklin Hoke).

V-345/11 #00345, Subseries: "2.4. Financial and Legal Volume, 1824-1830." Folder 210

One small notebook that includes extremely brief notes on financial matters and legal cases, 1824-1830

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 3. Writings and Speeches, circa 1870-1920.

About 150 items.

Arrangement: by subject.

Speeches and writings of William Alexander Hoke and others on a variety of topics. Specific items of interest include notes on a lecture about the theories of Charles Darwin (folder 211), an eerie story set in Mexico after the United States victory there in the 1840s (folder 212), William Alexander Hoke's speech introducing William Howard Taft to a group in Raleigh sometime after Taft left the White House but before he assumed the chief justiceship, another Hoke speech introducing Franklin D. Roosevelt when he was assistant secretary of the Navy (folder 214), and Sallie Badger Hoke's arguments against women's suffrage (folder 219).

Folder 211

Agriculture and nature #00345, Series: "3. Writings and Speeches, circa 1870-1920." Folder 211

Folder 212

Art and literature #00345, Series: "3. Writings and Speeches, circa 1870-1920." Folder 212

Folder 213

Civil War #00345, Series: "3. Writings and Speeches, circa 1870-1920." Folder 213

Folder 214

Colonial Dames #00345, Series: "3. Writings and Speeches, circa 1870-1920." Folder 214

Folder 215

Education #00345, Series: "3. Writings and Speeches, circa 1870-1920." Folder 215

Folder 216

History and philosophy #00345, Series: "3. Writings and Speeches, circa 1870-1920." Folder 216

Folder 217

Introductions of speakers by William Alexander Hoke #00345, Series: "3. Writings and Speeches, circa 1870-1920." Folder 217

Folder 218

Law and politics #00345, Series: "3. Writings and Speeches, circa 1870-1920." Folder 218

Folder 219

Memorial tributes by William Alexander Hoke #00345, Series: "3. Writings and Speeches, circa 1870-1920." Folder 219

Folder 220

Religion #00345, Series: "3. Writings and Speeches, circa 1870-1920." Folder 220

Folder 221

United Daughters of the Confederacy #00345, Series: "3. Writings and Speeches, circa 1870-1920." Folder 221

Folder 222

Women's suffrage #00345, Series: "3. Writings and Speeches, circa 1870-1920." Folder 222

Folder 223

Miscellaneous speeches #00345, Series: "3. Writings and Speeches, circa 1870-1920." Folder 223

Folder 224

Miscellaneous writings #00345, Series: "3. Writings and Speeches, circa 1870-1920." Folder 224

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 4. Genealogical Materials, 1750-1911.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 5. Miscellaneous Volumes, circa 1753-1900.

11 items.

Volumes that are either undated or are dated but cover multiple topics over several years.

Folder 233

V-345/13, circa 1753-1754, 42 pages #00345, Series: "5. Miscellaneous Volumes, circa 1753-1900." Folder 233

Small notebook written in German.

Folder 234

V-345/14, circa 1842-1851, 72 pages #00345, Series: "5. Miscellaneous Volumes, circa 1753-1900." Folder 234

Home cures and recipes arranged alphabetically, I-Y. For other recipes, see subseries 6.2.

Folder 235

V-345/15, 184801899, 135 pages #00345, Series: "5. Miscellaneous Volumes, circa 1753-1900." Folder 235

Ledger used for a variety of purposes. Most of the ledger (pages 4-84 and pages 122-131) is devoted to the records of the High Shoal Gold Mining Company (circa 1848-1859). Also included are various school assignments, including math (pages 93 and 134-135), French (pages 85-92), Shakespeare (pages 94-114), and English history (pages 115-119).

Folder 236

V-345/16, circa 1861, 29 pages #00345, Series: "5. Miscellaneous Volumes, circa 1753-1900." Folder 236

Notebook containing notes and essays on a variety of matters in no apparent order. Presumably it belonged to a member of the Alexander family. Topics include events of the American Revolution, the influence of abolitionists on a Miss Gould, and the secession movement.

Folder 237

V-345/17, circa 1862-1893, 384 pages #00345, Series: "5. Miscellaneous Volumes, circa 1753-1900." Folder 237

Ledger book used for many purposes. Apparently it originally belonged to a crewman of the Fanny, a Union vessel captured by the Confederate steamer Raleigh on which Joseph Wilson Alexander served. In addition to the Union crewman's irregular entries of poetry and observations on the war, the book includes drafts of letters and speeches and other items. A significant part of the ledger is devoted to the diary of Nancy Childs Hoke, 4 March 1887-8 January 1893 (pages 215-277). Also apparently in Nancy Childs Hoke's hand are recollections of a conversation between "Cousin Rob" (Confederate General Robert F. Hoke) and her father (John F. Hoke) on 8 February 1885 about the last days of the Civil War, the postwar political activities of General James Longstreet, the presidential pardon of General Robert F. Hoke, and related matters (pages 79-84).

Folder 238

V-345/18, circa 1860s-1890s, 159 pages #00345, Series: "5. Miscellaneous Volumes, circa 1753-1900." Folder 238

Account book containing newspaper clippings and handwritten recipes. Many of the clippings date from the Civil War though they are interspersed with ones from later. The clippings and recipes cover pages once used for recording financial information and practicing penmanship.

Folder 239

V-345/S-19, 1891, 8 pages #00345, Series: "5. Miscellaneous Volumes, circa 1753-1900." Folder 239

Scrapbook dated 13 March 1891 with newspaper clippings, some of which predate 1891 and most of which relate to politics.

Folder 240

V-345/20, circa 1880-1900, 54 pages #00345, Series: "5. Miscellaneous Volumes, circa 1753-1900." Folder 240

"Register of the Colored Sunday School, St. Luke's Church, Lincolnton, N.C."

Folder 241

V-345/21, circa 1890s, 23 pages #00345, Series: "5. Miscellaneous Volumes, circa 1753-1900." Folder 241

Reminiscences apparently by Sallie Badger Hoke of Julia, her family's slave nurse. Also some lists of colonial officials (pages 17-20), and notes in shorthand (page 23).

Folder 242

V-345/22, undated, 90 pages #00345, Series: "5. Miscellaneous Volumes, circa 1753-1900." Folder 242

Writings on law, philosophy, church history, and others topics.

Folder 243

V-345/23, undated, 29 pages #00345, Series: "5. Miscellaneous Volumes, circa 1753-1900." Folder 243

"From Bar-Room to Pulpit." Printed speech on temperance in pamphlet form.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 6. Other Papers, 1863-1910.

About 65 items.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 6.1. Clippings, 1863-1910.

About 40 items.

Clippings, primarily from North Carolina newspapers, covering legal cases, politics, obituaries, weddings, history, poetry, a speech of United States Secretary of the Interior Hoke Smith (1894), and the electric rail system in Charlotte, N.C. (1910). Also included is one sheet from the Charlotte Daily Bulletin (20 March 1863).

Folder 244

Clippings #00345, Subseries: "6.1. Clippings, 1863-1910." Folder 244

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 6.2. Recipes, undated.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 6.3. Calling Cards and Business Cards, circa 1870-1910.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Items Separated

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Processing Information

Processed by: Robert Tinkler, November 1994

Encoded by: Roslyn Holdzkom, October 2006

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