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Collection Number: 00371

Collection Title: Jackson and Prince Family Papers, 1784-1947

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the FAQ section for more information.


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Size 7.0 feet of linear shelf space (approximately 3400 items)
Abstract The Rootes family of Fredericksburg, Va., and the Cobb, Jackson, and Prince families of Athens, Macon, and other locations in Georgia belonged to the elite of the southern planter artistocracy. Henry Jackson(1778-1840) served as United States charge d'affaires in France (1812-1818) and taught at Franklin College in Athens, Ga. (1811-1813 and 1819-1828). His wife, Martha Jacquelin Rootes Cobb Jackson (1786-1853) operated her husband's Halscot Plantation outside Athens, Ga., and Cookshay Plantation in Chatham County, Ala., for over a decade after his death. Jackson's son, Henry Rootes Jackson, a brigadier general in the Confederate Army, also served as minister to Austria (1853-1858) and to Mexico (1885-1886). Oliver Hillhouse Prince (1823-1875), Jackson's son-in-law, was a Democratic Party newspaper editor deeply involved in Georgia politics in the 1840s, who became a large landholder and planter in Bibb and Baker counties. The papers consist of family, business, and political correspondence, financial and legal papers, and miscellaneous collected items. They include personal and plantation accounts; day books; slave records; deeds and indentures; diaries; scientific notes; and genealogical materials. The papers document the social and religious life of ante-bellum aristocratic women, including camp meetings and missionary activities, and offer insight into the economic and political life of Georgia. They also contain information on early American foreign affairs.
Creator Jackson family.

Prince family.
Language English
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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Information For Users

Restrictions to Access
No restrictions. Open for research.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the Jackson and Prince Family Papers #371, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Acquisitions Information
Received in March 1937 from Sarah Thomas Watters, Florence Thomas Drane, George Thomas, and Marie Thomas, the great grandchildren of Henry Jackson. Four items were added in 1943 and include account books for Martha J. (Cobb) Jackson, 1814-1817; Martha and Henry Jackson, 1819-1853; and Henry Jackson, 1813-1818; and a volume containing two diaries.
(The diaries were written by Henry Rootes Jackson, 1837, and Sarah Rootes (Jackson) Prince, 1854). One item, a letter to General Henry Rootes Jackson, 21 July 1861, was received in 1948 from F. B. Voegele. Ten items, consisting of pamphlets and addresses, were received in 1950 from Dr. London. One item, a letter to General Henry Rootes Jackson, 9 August 1861, was purchased in 1957. Received from Marie Colton in December 1995 (Acc. 95147) and in December 2000 (Acc. 98817).
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subject Headings

The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Biographical Information

Henry Jackson, American educator, diplomat, and planter, was born in Moretonhampstead, Devonshire, England, in 1778, the youngest son of James and Mary Webber Jackson. He emigrated to America in 1790 and took up the study of medicine, graduating from the Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1802. Unhappy as a physician, he pursued an academic career and became professor of sciences and mathematics at Franklin College (later the University of Georgia) in 1811. In 1813 Jackson interrupted his teaching to accompany William H. Crawford to France as secretary to the American Legation. He remained in Paris as charge d'affaires until 1818, when he returned to Franklin College. In 1828 Jackson resigned his teaching post and moved to Halscot (also called Henry's Mount Farm), his plantation near Athens.

Henry Jackson's older brother James Jackson (1757-1806), a Revolutionary War general and political protege of William H. Crawford, served as a U.S. congressman from Georgia in the early 1790s, as governor of Georgia from 1798 to 1801, and as a U.S. senator from that state from 1801 until his death. Henry's older brother Abraham also lived in Georgia in the 1790s and served in the Georgia House of Representatives circa 1803.

In 1819 Henry Jackson married Martha Jacquelin Rootes Cobb, the widow of Captain Howell Cobb (1772-1818). Martha was born in Fredericksburg, Virginia, in 1776, the daughter of Thomas Reade and Sarah Ryng Battaile Rootes. Before she married in 1810, she lived with her family in Fredericksburg. She then moved with her husband first to Washington City, then in 1812 to his plantation outside Louisville, Georgia. One year after Cobb's death she married Henry Jackson and moved with him to Athens, then later to his Halscot Plantation, where she lived until around 1850 or 1851. She died in 1853.

Martha's sister, Sarah Robinson Rootes (1792-1867), married Howell Cobb's brother, John Addison Cobb, and Henry Jackson's nephew, William Henry Jackson, married Howell Cobb's sister, Mildred Lewis Cobb.

Henry and Martha Jackson had three children. Their son Henry Rootes Jackson (1820-1898) became active in politics, serving as judge and minister to Austria, 1853-1858, and to Mexico, 1885-1886. He also served as a Confederate general in the Civil War. One of their daughters, Martha, married Col. Hezekiah F. Erwin, and another, Sarah Maria Rootes Jackson, married Oliver Hillhouse Prince, Jr.

A Georgia planter and newspaper editor, Oliver Hillhouse Prince was born 16 March 1823 in Bibb County, the son of Oliver Hillhouse Prince (senior) and Mary Ross Norman Prince. The elder Prince, a founder of the city of Macon, died, along with his wife, in a shipwreck off the coast of North Carolina in 1837. Orphaned, the young Prince became a ward of his uncle, Washington Poe of Macon.

Prince received most of his education at Dr. Beaman's School in Milledgeville, Georgia, and at Yale College in Virginia. Around 1844 he began editing the Georgia Telegraph , an organ of the Democratic party. He left the paper in 1847 to serve as a lieutenant with the 13th U.S. Cavalry in the Mexican War.

Following the war Prince became a prominent planter, operating several large Georgia plantations. In 1852 he married Sarah Jackson. During the Civil War Prince served as a volunteer aide-de-camp, receiving a captain's commission and helping conscript soldiers in Baker County, Georgia. His wife and children (Basiline, Henry, Marie Jacqueline, and Oliver) resided in Bath, Georgia, during the war and for several years afterward while Prince stayed on his plantation in Baker County. Prince died in 1875.

(Much of the information for these sketches came from the genealogical material contained in Subseries 9.1 of Subcollection 2. Sketches of James Jackson and Henry Rootes Jackson can be found in the Dictionary of American Biography.)

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Scope and Content

This collection consists mostly of family letters and plantation papers, but also contains business papers of Henry Jackson and Oliver Hillhouse Prince. Prince's papers offer substantial information on the politically turbulent decades leading up to the Civil War and on family genealogy, and they appear in a separate subcollection to facilitate their use. Note, however, that information on Georgia and national politics also appears in the Jackson subcollection.

The Jackson subcollection includes the papers of the widely connected Rootes, Cobb, and Jackson families, and the Prince subcollection contains the papers of Oliver Hillhouse Prince and other members of the Prince, Hillhouse, and related families. Within the subcollections, divisions appear between correspondence, financial and legal papers, diaries, pictures, and other papers.

About two-thirds of the Jackson subcollection consists of correspondence (Series 1). Most of it is with family, though a considerable portion, especially Henry Jackson's correspondence as charge d'affaires (1813-1818), is business related. Letters exchanged among the members (mostly women) of the Rootes, Cobb, and Jackson families offer a wealth of information on the family, religious, and educational life of the Virginia and Georgia aristocracies. Topics include camp meetings, missionary activities, church divisions, slave-master relations, courtship and marriage, the education and rearing of children, and financial worries (including those caused by the War of 1812 and falling cotton prices in the 1830s). Of particular interest are letters from Martha Rootes Cobb Jackson after the death of Henry Jackson in 1840, which document her management of their plantations in Georgia and Alabama for more than ten years. Correspondence between the American and English members of Henry Jackson's family provides insight into immigration to America and early Georgia and national politics.

Henry Jackson's business correspondence relates to his service as charge d'affaires in France, to his connections with Franklin College (later the University of Georgia), and to his operation of plantations in Georgia and Alabama (1828-1840). Jackson's correspondence as charge d'affaires is sketchy and illuminates little beyond his routine activities; however, it does touch on sensitive issues surrounding American shipping rights. His correspondence pertaining to Franklin College (where he taught from 1811 to 1813 and from 1818 to 1828) chiefly provides information on his role in procuring scientific supplies for the school, but it also discusses individual students. Later correspondence in the early 1830s, when Jackson served on the college's board of trustees, addresses early conflicts over the school's administration.

The financial and legal papers in Series 2 and 3 of the Jackson subcollection chiefly document the operation of the Jacksons' Halscot Plantation outside Athens, Ga., and their Cookshay Plantation in Chatham County, Ala. Some material also appears on the finances of the American Legation in Paris and on Henry's personal expenses while a medical student.

Series 4 contains diaries and loose diary entries of Henry Jackson and Martha Jacquelin (Rootes) Cobb Jackson and of their children Henry Rootes Jackson, Sarah Maria Rootes (Jackson) Prince, and Martha Rootes (Jackson) Erwin.

Of special interest among the subcollection's Other Papers (Series 5) are items documenting late eighteenth and early nineteeth-century scientific disciplines and a number of miscellaneous items providing insight into religious thought, daily plantation life, and Georgia politics.

Series 6 contains 13 unidentified pictures of individuals, probably family members, and one unidentified house.

Correspondence (Series 7) accounts for about one-half of the Prince subcollection. Oliver Prince's personal and business letters, chiefly 1839 to 1852, contain frequent commentary on local, state, and national politics. Topics include the contest between George M. Troup and John Clark in Georgia in 1825; the election of James K. Polk, and the annexation of Texas. Of interest in his later correspondence is discussion of developments during the Civil War in Baker County. Other correspondence belongs mostly to Prince's wife, Sarah (Jackson) Prince, his daughter, Basiline, and Basiline's cousin, Margaret P. Hillhouse. Sarah's correspondence deals mostly with religious and family life, and Basiline and Margaret's, which comprises the bulk of the subcollection after 1873, provides a rich source on the genealogy of the Rootes, Cobb, Jackson, Prince, Hillhouse, King, Cary, Jacquelin, Thomas, and other families.

The financial and legal papers of Oliver Prince (Series 8) mostly document his plantation activities. Only scattered information appears on personal expenses or on the finances of the Georgia Telegraph. Almost all of the material filed under Other Papers (Series 9) in the Prince subcollection is related to family genealogy. Miscellaneous items pertain to Georgia politics.

Note: To clarify the family relationships of women in the collection, maiden names are generally included where appropriate.

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Contents list

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series Quick Links

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subcollection 1. Jackson Family Papers, 1784-1880.

About 1800 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 1. Correspondence, 1884-1880.

About 2400 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Personal letters exchanged between members of the Rootes, Cobb, and Jackson families, or between members of these families and their friends, and business correspondence of Henry Jackson. A considerable amount of the correspondence belongs to the women of these families. A small portion (about 125 items) of the correspondence was received by the Southern Historical Collection already having suffered significant mold or physical damage or having deteriorated to fragments. These items have been interfiled chronologically whenever possible. Most appear in Subseries 1.1 through Subseries 1.4

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.1. 1784-1811.

About 100 items.

Chiefly correspondence of Henry Jackson and Martha Jacquelin (Rootes) Cobb Jackson, with some correspondence of other members of their families.

Between 1784 and 1811 the collection contains mostly letters received by Martha Rootes from women in her family, including her aunt Lucy Thornton, who lived in Caroline County, Virginia, her cousin Martha M. J. Robinson of Winchester, Virginia, and her friends Mary Cooke and E. Marion. Of interest are references to courtship, friendship, religious devotion and missionary efforts, plantation life, the treatment of slaves, and the difficulties women encountered in operating a plantation.

Correspondence of Abraham Jackson (Henry's brother) is dated 1782 to 1805 and consists mostly of letters to or from his mother and brothers. These letters contain primarily family news, but have scattered references to Georgia and national politics. Of interest is a fragment, ca. 1789, from Abraham to his brother Samuel discussing the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. (For additional correspondence of Abraham and other Jackson family members, see Subsubseries 9.1.1.)

Henry Jackson's correspondence for this period is scattered. Of note is a series of letters from mid-1811 to early 1812 concerning the settlement of Joseph Webber's (his grandfather's) English estate. Correspondents include his brothers Joseph and Samuel and his sister Eliza.

Folder 1

1784-1785 #00371, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1811." Folder 1

Folder 2

1786-1798 #00371, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1811." Folder 2

Folder 3

1799-1804 #00371, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1811." Folder 3

Folder 4

1805-1807 #00371, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1811." Folder 4

Folder 5

1808-1810 #00371, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1811." Folder 5

Folder 6

1811 #00371, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1811." Folder 6

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.2. 1812-1818.

About 350 items.

Letters about equally divided between Martha's family correspondence and Henry Jackson's personal and business correspondence. Letters to Martha from Lucy Thornton note church happenings, including splits occurring in the Baptist church in Fredericksburg, Virginia. Letters from Martha's father mostly discuss the education and rearing of Martha's sisters, Laura and Sarah, who lived with Martha from 1814 to 1817 and possibly afterward while her parents resided on their White Marsh plantation in Gloucester County, Virginia. These letters are useful in illuminating the expected role of women in the church and family. Martha's father's letters also describe the difficulties he and other planters around White Marsh experienced during the War of 1812.

Jackson's correspondence from 1812 to 1818 is mostly correspondence with the members of his family in England and his correspondence as charge d'affaires. His most frequent correspondent was his nephew Jabez (in London and later the U.S.). They wrote about family, Jabez's career, and politics (including the War of 1812 and various U.S. political figures). The most useful of Jackson's charge d'affaires papers are copies of letters to the French government (contained in one letter copy book dated 1815-1816). These chiefly concern American shipping rights and difficulties encountered by American citizens in France. Other official correspondence includes letters of introduction, invitations, thank-you notes, financial correspondence, and pleas for help from American citizens.

Folder 7

1812 #00371, Subseries: "1.2. 1812-1818." Folder 7

Folder 8

1813 #00371, Subseries: "1.2. 1812-1818." Folder 8

Folder 9

1814 #00371, Subseries: "1.2. 1812-1818." Folder 9

Folder 10

1815 #00371, Subseries: "1.2. 1812-1818." Folder 10

Folder 11-12a

Folder 11

1816 #00371, Subseries: "1.2. 1812-1818." Folder 11-12a

Folder 12b

Letter Copy Book, 1815-1816 #00371, Subseries: "1.2. 1812-1818." Folder 12b

Folder 13-15

Folder 13

Folder 14

Folder 15

1817 #00371, Subseries: "1.2. 1812-1818." Folder 13-15

Folder 15-17

Folder 15

Folder 16

Folder 17

1818 #00371, Subseries: "1.2. 1812-1818." Folder 15-17

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.3. 1819-1828.

About 450 items.

Predominantly Henry Jackson's business correspondence, much of which relates to Franklin College. This correspondence concerns the acquisition of laboratory and other materials, students, and the governance of the college. Jackson's personal correspondence consists mostly of letters with his family, especially his nephews Joseph Webber Jackson and William Henry Jackson, and with old acquaintances in Paris. These letters frequently discuss politics. There is also correspondence relating to Jackson's land acquisitions.

Letters to Martha from her father, Lucy Thornton, and other family members concern family news and events, camp meetings and other church news, and her marriage to Henry Jackson. For a first-person account of an interracial camp meeting see the 12 August 1819 letter to Martha from Mrs. Sherwood. A series of letters Martha and Henry wrote each other during their courtship appears for 1819. Another series of letters they wrote each other in 1827 and 1828 while separated also appears. These letters contain detailed information on daily life at Halscot.

Folder 18-23

Folder 18

Folder 19

Folder 20

Folder 21

Folder 22

Folder 23

1819 #00371, Subseries: "1.3. 1819-1828." Folder 18-23

Folder 24-25

Folder 24

Folder 25

1820 #00371, Subseries: "1.3. 1819-1828." Folder 24-25

Folder 26

1821 #00371, Subseries: "1.3. 1819-1828." Folder 26

Folder 27

1822 #00371, Subseries: "1.3. 1819-1828." Folder 27

Folder 28

1823 #00371, Subseries: "1.3. 1819-1828." Folder 28

Folder 29

1824 #00371, Subseries: "1.3. 1819-1828." Folder 29

Folder 30

1825-1826 #00371, Subseries: "1.3. 1819-1828." Folder 30

Folder 31

1827 #00371, Subseries: "1.3. 1819-1828." Folder 31

Folder 32-33

Folder 32

Folder 33

1828 #00371, Subseries: "1.3. 1819-1828." Folder 32-33

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.4. 1829-1840.

About 300 items.

Chiefly personal correspondence of Henry and Martha Jackson and their chidren, Henry Rootes Jackson, Sarah Rootes Jackson, and Martha Rootes Jackson. Henry's letters discuss a broad range of topics, including Georgia politics, land acquisitions, Franklin College, financial difficulties, and the education of his son, Henry Rootes Jackson. Among his most frequent correspondents were his nephews Jabez and Joseph Webber Jackson. Martha expanded her correspondence to include an ever-widening network of relatives and friends, including her sister Serena (Rootes) Lea, wife of Henry C. Lea of Alabama; Elizabeth Schley, wife of Georgia governor William Schley; and a number of nieces and nephews. Of note among the childrens' correspondence are letters by Henry Rootes Jackson to his family while he was studying at Edgehill Seminary in New Jersey (1834-1835) and at Yale College in New Haven (1836-1839). They chiefly discuss his social life and campus events.

Folder 34

1829 #00371, Subseries: "1.4. 1829-1840." Folder 34

Folder 35

1830 #00371, Subseries: "1.4. 1829-1840." Folder 35

Folder 36

1831 #00371, Subseries: "1.4. 1829-1840." Folder 36

Folder 37

1832 #00371, Subseries: "1.4. 1829-1840." Folder 37

Folder 38-40

Folder 38

Folder 39

Folder 40

1833 #00371, Subseries: "1.4. 1829-1840." Folder 38-40

Folder 41

1834 #00371, Subseries: "1.4. 1829-1840." Folder 41

Folder 42-43

Folder 42

Folder 43

1835 #00371, Subseries: "1.4. 1829-1840." Folder 42-43

Folder 44

1836 #00371, Subseries: "1.4. 1829-1840." Folder 44

Folder 45-47

Folder 45

Folder 46

Folder 47

1837 #00371, Subseries: "1.4. 1829-1840." Folder 45-47

Folder 47

January-September 1838 #00371, Subseries: "1.4. 1829-1840." Folder 47

Folder 48

October 1838-1839 #00371, Subseries: "1.4. 1829-1840." Folder 48

Folder 49-50

Folder 49

Folder 50

1840 #00371, Subseries: "1.4. 1829-1840." Folder 49-50

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.5. Undated (circa 1784-1840)

About 100 items.

Letters that do not bear dates, but that can be placed in this period. They include few letters to and by Henry Jackson while in France, a large number of letters exchanged between Henry and Martha Jackson during separations (probably late 1820s and early 1830s), letters to Martha from Mary Ann Lamar, Sarah (Rootes) Cobb, Sarah (Jackson) Prince, and other family members. Jackson's French correspondence is mostly personal. Letters between Henry and Martha and correspondence with other family members provide information mostly on family matters and life at Halscot. Correspondence with Henry Smith, overseer at Cookshay, provides information on the operation of the plantation.

Folder 51-58

Folder 51

Folder 52

Folder 53

Folder 54

Folder 55

Folder 56

Folder 57

Folder 58

Undated #00371, Subseries: "1.5. Undated (circa 1784-1840)" Folder 51-58

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.6. 1841-1859.

About 500 items.

Mostly the correspondence of Martha (Rootes) Cobb Jackson and her children. Much of this correspondence documents Martha Jackson's operation of the Halscot Plantation outside Athens, Ga., and the Cookshay Plantation in Chatham County, Ala., for over a decade after her husband's death in 1840. A considerable number of letters with the overseers on the Cookshay plantation discuss its operation in detail. Numerous letters from Henry Rootes Jackson and from Henry Jackson's nephew Joseph Webber Jackson also concern plantation matters and finances. Martha's correspondence with her daughters and with other family members often discusses the status of her crops and livestock.

Letters exchanged among Henry Rootes Jackson, Sarah Rootes Jackson (later Prince), Martha Rootes Jackson (later Erwin), and their mother discuss mostly personal news. Sarah and Martha's letters with a number of cousins, including Mary Ann Lamar and Laura Battaile Cobb, discuss religion, including missions to Africa, family, and society news. Several letters in the 1840s pertain to Henry Rootes Jackson's service in the Mexican War.

Folder 59

1841 #00371, Subseries: "1.6. 1841-1859." Folder 59

Folder 60-61

Folder 60

Folder 61

1842 #00371, Subseries: "1.6. 1841-1859." Folder 60-61

Folder 62

1843 #00371, Subseries: "1.6. 1841-1859." Folder 62

Folder 63

1844 #00371, Subseries: "1.6. 1841-1859." Folder 63

Folder 64

1845 #00371, Subseries: "1.6. 1841-1859." Folder 64

Folder 65-67

Folder 65

Folder 66

Folder 67

1846 #00371, Subseries: "1.6. 1841-1859." Folder 65-67

Folder 68

1847 #00371, Subseries: "1.6. 1841-1859." Folder 68

Folder 69

1848 #00371, Subseries: "1.6. 1841-1859." Folder 69

Folder 70-72

Folder 70

Folder 71

Folder 72

1849 #00371, Subseries: "1.6. 1841-1859." Folder 70-72

Folder 73

1850-1851 #00371, Subseries: "1.6. 1841-1859." Folder 73

Folder 74-75

Folder 74

Folder 75

1852 #00371, Subseries: "1.6. 1841-1859." Folder 74-75

Folder 76

1853 #00371, Subseries: "1.6. 1841-1859." Folder 76

Folder 77

1854-1859 #00371, Subseries: "1.6. 1841-1859." Folder 77

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.7. 1860-1880.

13 items.

Chiefly Civil War correspondence of Henry Rootes Jackson. Included are two letters by Jackson concerning the retreat from Sherman's army, one to Henry Rootes Jackson concerning his orders recalling the 1st Georgia Regiment to duty, and one to Jackson from 1st Lieutenant Samuel Dawson reporting an exchange of prisoners and other military matters. Miscellaneous items, dated 1861, 1868, 1879, and 1880 are addressed to Mary Ann Cobb and General and Mrs. Jackson and concern family matters

Folder 78

1860-1880 #00371, Subseries: "1.7. 1860-1880." Folder 78

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 2. Financial Volumes and Papers, 1812-1896 and undated.

About 400 items.

Financial papers of Henry and Martha (Rootes) Cobb Jackson and their children. The papers include personal accounts, records of Jackson's service as Charge d'Affaires to France (1812-1818), and plantation accounts.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.1. Charge d'Affaires Accounts, 1812-1818.

About 130 items.

Financial records of Henry Jackson while secretary to the American Legation and later Charge d'Affaires for the United States in France. Personal accounts consist mostly of bills and receipts for living expenses. American Legation accounts consist of bills, receipts, and records kept for postage, stationery, printing, salary, and miscellaneous expenses. Correspondence related to Jackson's financial affairs in Paris may be found in Subseries 1.2.

Folder 79

1812-1815 #00371, Subseries: "2.1. Charge d'Affaires Accounts, 1812-1818." Folder 79

Folder 80

1815-1816 #00371, Subseries: "2.1. Charge d'Affaires Accounts, 1812-1818." Folder 80

Folder 81

1816-1818 #00371, Subseries: "2.1. Charge d'Affaires Accounts, 1812-1818." Folder 81

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.2. Personal Accounts, 1796-1820.

18 items.

Mostly Henry Jackson's personal accounts while attending medical school in Philadelphia (one volume dated 1796-1797) and while working as a doctor (one volume dated 1809-1810 and five receipts for personal goods). There are also other miscellaneous receipts for 1817 through 1820. A personal account book belonging to Henry and Martha Jackson appears for 1819-1820. (There are plantation accounts for 1850-1851 contained in the back of this volume.) One undated item may relate to a commission received by Jackson to buy scientific supplies from France for the University of Georgia.

Folder 82

Henry Jackson, 1796-1797 #00371, Subseries: "2.2. Personal Accounts, 1796-1820." Folder 82

Folder 83

Henry Jackson, 1809-1810 #00371, Subseries: "2.2. Personal Accounts, 1796-1820." Folder 83

Folder 84

Henry Jackson, 1812-1820 and undated #00371, Subseries: "2.2. Personal Accounts, 1796-1820." Folder 84

Folder 85

Henry and Martha Jackson, 1819-1820 and Plantation Account Book, 1850-1851 (in same volume) #00371, Subseries: "2.2. Personal Accounts, 1796-1820." Folder 85

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.3. Plantation Accounts, 1816-1869 and undated.

About 250 items.

Plantation papers of Henry and Martha Jackson and of their son Henry Rootes Jackson. The earliest papers appear for the Louisville, Ga., plantation owned by Howell and Martha (Rootes) Cobb (later Jackson) and dated 1816-1818. Subsequent papers concern the Halscot Plantation of Henry and Martha Jackson, outside Athens (1818-1850s); the Cookshay Plantation (Chatham County, Ala.) owned by the Jacksons (1838?-1852), and a plantation (location unknown) owned by Henry Rootes Jackson.

Papers include household and plantation account books, livestock records, plantation day books, receipts, accounts with cotton factors, slave lists and value assessments, and tax records.

Folder 86

Plantation account book, 1816-1818 and 1817-1818 #00371, Subseries: "2.3. Plantation Accounts, 1816-1869 and undated." Folder 86

Martha (Rootes) Cobb's accounts for the Louisville, Ga., plantation

Folder 87

Plantation account book, 1819-1820 #00371, Subseries: "2.3. Plantation Accounts, 1816-1869 and undated." Folder 87

Henry and Martha Jackson's accounts, probably at Henry's Mount Farm (later called Halscot?) outside Athens

Folder 88

Plantation account book, 1823-1824 #00371, Subseries: "2.3. Plantation Accounts, 1816-1869 and undated." Folder 88

Henry and Martha Jackson's accounts at Henry's Mount Farm

Folder 89

Plantation accounts, 1824-1834 #00371, Subseries: "2.3. Plantation Accounts, 1816-1869 and undated." Folder 89

Memorandum Book, 1824-1826, recipes

Folder 90

Plantation account book, 1833-1834 #00371, Subseries: "2.3. Plantation Accounts, 1816-1869 and undated." Folder 90

Henry and Martha Jackson's accounts at Halscot, and day book, 1835-1837

Folder 91

Plantation accounts, 1835-1838 #00371, Subseries: "2.3. Plantation Accounts, 1816-1869 and undated." Folder 91

Folder 92

Account book, 1839 #00371, Subseries: "2.3. Plantation Accounts, 1816-1869 and undated." Folder 92

Henry and Martha Jackson's accounts for Cookshay Plantation (Chatham County, Ala.)

Folder 93

Plantation accounts, 1839-1840 #00371, Subseries: "2.3. Plantation Accounts, 1816-1869 and undated." Folder 93

Folder 94

Account book, 1841 #00371, Subseries: "2.3. Plantation Accounts, 1816-1869 and undated." Folder 94

Martha Jackson's accounts at Cookshay plantation

Folder 95

Plantation accounts, 1841-1842 #00371, Subseries: "2.3. Plantation Accounts, 1816-1869 and undated." Folder 95

Folder 96

Plantation accounts, 1843-1844 #00371, Subseries: "2.3. Plantation Accounts, 1816-1869 and undated." Folder 96

Folder 97

Plantation accounts, 1845-1850 #00371, Subseries: "2.3. Plantation Accounts, 1816-1869 and undated." Folder 97

Folder 98

Day book, 1847 #00371, Subseries: "2.3. Plantation Accounts, 1816-1869 and undated." Folder 98

Martha Jackson's notes on daily operation of Halscot? Plantation and Day book, 1849, Martha Jackson's accounts and notes on operation of Halscot. See also accounts for 1850 and 1851 in the volume in folder 85.

Folder 99

Day book, 1851 #00371, Subseries: "2.3. Plantation Accounts, 1816-1869 and undated." Folder 99

Martha Jackson's accounts and notes on operation of Halscot

Folder 100

Plantation Accounts, 1851-1852 #00371, Subseries: "2.3. Plantation Accounts, 1816-1869 and undated." Folder 100

Folder 101

Plantation accounts, 1852-1853 #00371, Subseries: "2.3. Plantation Accounts, 1816-1869 and undated." Folder 101

Folder 102

Account book, 1852-1869 and undated #00371, Subseries: "2.3. Plantation Accounts, 1816-1869 and undated." Folder 102

Martha Jackson's accounts at Halscot

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 3. Legal Papers, 1818-1868and undated.

About items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Primarily papers of Dr. Henry Jackson, Martha Rootes Cobb Jackson, and Henry Rootes Jackson. Papers include land grants, deeds, indentures (loan and property), bills of sale for slaves, employment agreements with overseers, bonds, and other legal items related to the operation of the Jackson plantations. A considerable portion of the papers pertain to the settlement of Jackson's estate after his death in 1840.

Folder 103

1818-1842 #00371, Series: "3. Legal Papers, 1818-1868and undated." Folder 103

Folder 104

1843-1847 #00371, Series: "3. Legal Papers, 1818-1868and undated." Folder 104

Folder 105

1848-1868 and undated #00371, Series: "3. Legal Papers, 1818-1868and undated." Folder 105

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 4. Diaries, 1801-1854.

19 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Diaries kept by Jackson family members, mostly focusing on religion and daily life. There is one undated diary probably belonging to Martha's father, Thomas Reade Rootes. Entries for Martha Jacquelin (Rootes) Cobb Jackson provide insight into the religious life of an upper class Baptist woman. She commented extensively on sermons, the Bible, and her relationship to God. Childhood diaries by Henry Rootes, Martha, and Sarah Jackson describe the family's farm and social activities on their Halscot Plantation in the early 1830s. Henry Jackson's diaries contain ideas on scientific matters. Thomas Reade Rootes's diary offers opinions on a variety of social and ethical topics.

Folder 106

Diary, 1801 #00371, Series: "4. Diaries, 1801-1854." Folder 106

Henry Jackson discusses school life at the Medical College of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia), where Jackson studied medicine.

Diary and loose entries, 1806, Martha (Rootes) Cobb 16 pp. Diary, 5 pp. loose entries. #00371, Series: "4. Diaries, 1801-1854." Folder 106

Records religious meditations and thoughts.

Diary, 1 Sept. 1811 to 11 October 1811, Henry Jackson, 35 pp. #00371, Series: "4. Diaries, 1801-1854." Folder 106

Discusses scientific ideas and describes contemporary books and inventions.

Diary, 4 January 1813, Martha (Rootes) Cobb, 19 pp. #00371, Series: "4. Diaries, 1801-1854." Folder 106

Records religious thoughts.

Diary entry (loose), 24 October 1815, Martha (Rootes) Cobb, 4 pp. #00371, Series: "4. Diaries, 1801-1854." Folder 106

Records religious thoughts.

Diary, 13 October 1814 to 30 January 1817, Martha (Rootes) Cobb, 48 pp. #00371, Series: "4. Diaries, 1801-1854." Folder 106

Records religious meditations and thoughts.

Diary 14 May 1816 to 10 September 1816, Martha (Rootes) Cobb, 20 pp. #00371, Series: "4. Diaries, 1801-1854." Folder 106

Records religious thoughts.

"A Diary of Scripture Promises or The Soul's Every Day Feast," 1818, Author unknown, 38 pp. #00371, Series: "4. Diaries, 1801-1854." Folder 106

Lists scriptural passages for reflection by day.

Diary entry (loose), 22 February 1821, Martha (Rootes) Cobb Jackson, 3 pp. #00371, Series: "4. Diaries, 1801-1854." Folder 106

Records religious thoughts.

Folder 106

Folder 107

Diary, ? May 1830 to 29 March 1831, Henry Rootes Jackson, 41 pp. #00371, Series: "4. Diaries, 1801-1854." Folder 106, Folder 107

Discusses daily life at the Jacksons' Halscot Plantations, including comings and goings and farm and other activities of his parents and sisters.

Folder 106

Diary, 4 June 1833 to 4 September 1834, Martha Rootes Jackson, 76 pp. #00371, Series: "4. Diaries, 1801-1854." Folder 106

Discusses daily life at the Halscot Plantation, including household and farm chores and leisure activities.

Diary, 13 May 1834 to 28 October 1835, Sarah Maria Rootes Jackson, 87 pp. #00371, Series: "4. Diaries, 1801-1854." Folder 106

Discusses daily life at the Halscot Plantation, including household and farm chores and leisure activities.

Folder 108

Diary, March 1837, Henry Rootes Jackson, 157 pp. (Diary 2 January 1854 to 26 April 1854, Sarah Rootes(Jackson) Prince, 58 pp. contained in same volume.) #00371, Series: "4. Diaries, 1801-1854." Folder 108

Written while he was a student at Yale, Henry Rootes Jackson's diary records mostly personal feelings and school notes. Many of his early poems are included. Sarah (Jackson) Prince's diary discusses family, plantation activities, and her religious feelings.

Folder 109

Diary entries (loose), Martha (Rootes) Cobb Jackson, 9 March 1834 and undated. 2 pp. #00371, Series: "4. Diaries, 1801-1854." Folder 109

Comments on Bible chapters read.

Diary entries (loose), 12 February 1844 and 27 February 1844, probably belonging to Martha (Rootes) Cobb Jackson, 2 pp. #00371, Series: "4. Diaries, 1801-1854." Folder 109

Records religious thoughts.

Diary, 10 March 1844 to 26 May 1845, Martha (Rootes) Cobb Jackson, 7 pp. #00371, Series: "4. Diaries, 1801-1854." Folder 109

Comments on sermons heard.

Diary, 1846, Martha (Rootes) Cobb Jackson, 10 pp. #00371, Series: "4. Diaries, 1801-1854." Folder 109

Comments on sermons heard.

Diary, undated, Martha (Rootes) Cobb Jackson, 15 pp. #00371, Series: "4. Diaries, 1801-1854." Folder 109

Records religious thoughts.

Diary, undated, probably Thomas Reade Rootes, 51 pp. #00371, Series: "4. Diaries, 1801-1854." Folder 109

(Labeled Laura B. Rootes, Federal Hill, but has only 4 pp. of doodling and calculations by her.) Offers opinions on a variety of topics, including women wearing men's clothes and sensuous overindulgence.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 5. Other Papers, 1787-1854.

About 90 items.

Arrangement: alphabetical by type.

Scientific notes and miscellaneous items collected by the Jackson and Rootes families. Notes on lectures Henry Jackson attended in France in 1816 and 1817 and on medical school and other classes Henry and James Jackson and others attended (around 1787-1788 and 1793-1794) cover the fields of medicine, botany, optics, physics, mathematics, and economics. Other items of scientific interest are articles and prospecti for medical journals and schools, Henry Jackson's notes on homeopathic medical remedies, and lectures and examinations he used in his teaching at Franklin College.

A variety of miscellaneous items appear, including writings, addresses, school materials, and clippings. Among the literary materials are a number of poems, manuscript and printed, by Thomas Reade Rootes Cobb, Henry Rootes Jackson, Martha (Jackson) Erwin, and others; a copy of the sheet music for "The Red Old Hills of Georgia," with lyrics by Henry Rootes Jackson; and a sketch by an unknown author entitled "Sentimental Journey Through the Pine Woods in Carolina." Several public addresses appear. Of interest is a 4 July 1832 presentation made by T. H. Guenebault before the Phi Kappa Society of Athens, probably at Franklin College.

School and other educational materials include French exercise books for Henry Rootes Jackson (1832) and Martha J. Jackson (1836); Henry Jackson's undated translation of Corinne; and Martha (Rootes) Cobb Jackson's undated, handwritten copy of a Roman history. Other miscellaneous items include prints of the Lucy Cobb Institute; line drawings of family members; word derivations; an art school advertisement; a recipe; an 1842 school report for Lucy Lea (niece of Martha Jackson); an 1870 description of an invention; a ticket to a lecture on animal magnetism; and a card for Miss Jane E. Terry. Nine broadsides appear, and include announcements of concerts, business circulars, campaign posters for Henry Lea (1843), and a circular of the American Baptist Society for Evangelizing the Jews (1845).

A copy of La Patria Illustria (1885, Mexico) with a picture of Henry Jackson, Minister of the United States in Mexico, on the front (oversize) and an undated handwritten copy of the "Rules of Procedures in the Senate and House of Representatives of the U.S., Remarks" also appear.

Among documents illuminating religious life are the constitution of the Female Mite Society of Athens and Vicinity (ca. 1818, Ga.), the minutes of the Trail Creek Sunday School Society (1819, Ga.), and an account a split within the Baptist Church of Savannah (1846).

Clippings are all obituaries, except for an 1886 letter to the editor of an unidentified paper by Henry Rootes Jackson thanking the Americans in Mexico for a tribute they had paid him.

Folder 110

Addresses, 1844, 1872, and undated #00371, Series: "5. Other Papers, 1787-1854." Folder 110

Folder 111

Broadsides, 1842, 1843, 1845, and undated #00371, Series: "5. Other Papers, 1787-1854." Folder 111

Folder 112

Calling cards (Dr. Henry Jackson, Henry Rootes Jackson, Sarah M. Jackson) #00371, Series: "5. Other Papers, 1787-1854." Folder 112

Folder 11

Class examinations (Dr. Henry Jackson, undated) #00371, Series: "5. Other Papers, 1787-1854." Folder 11

Folder 114-123

Folder 114

Folder 115

Folder 116

Folder 117

Folder 118

Folder 119

Folder 120

Folder 121

Folder 122

Folder 123

Class notes, Henry Jackson, ca. 1800-1827 and undated #00371, Series: "5. Other Papers, 1787-1854." Folder 114-123

Folder 124a

Class notes (Henry or James Jackson, 1793-1794) #00371, Series: "5. Other Papers, 1787-1854." Folder 124a

Folder 124b

Class notes (Unidentified, 1787-1788) #00371, Series: "5. Other Papers, 1787-1854." Folder 124b

Folder 124c

Clippings, 1855, 1866, 1868, 1886, and Undated #00371, Series: "5. Other Papers, 1787-1854." Folder 124c

Folder 125

Miscellaneous, 1832, 1836, 1842, 1870, 1885, 1901 #00371, Series: "5. Other Papers, 1787-1854." Folder 125

Folder 126

Miscellaneous, Undated #00371, Series: "5. Other Papers, 1787-1854." Folder 126

Folder 127

Poems (printed and manuscript) #00371, Series: "5. Other Papers, 1787-1854." Folder 127

Folder 128

Prints and drawings #00371, Series: "5. Other Papers, 1787-1854." Folder 128

Folder 129

Religious material, ca. 1818, 1819, 1850, and undated #00371, Series: "5. Other Papers, 1787-1854." Folder 129

Folder 130

Scientific and medical material (printed), 1808, 1814, 1832, 1837, 1845 and undated #00371, Series: "5. Other Papers, 1787-1854." Folder 130

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 6. Pictures, undated.

14 items.

Thirteen photographs of unidentified family members and one unidentified photograph of a house.

Image

#00371, Series: "6. Pictures, undated."

Image P-371/1

Portrait of unidentified man. #00371, Series: "6. Pictures, undated." P-371/1

Image P-371/2

Portrait of unidentified man in uniform. #00371, Series: "6. Pictures, undated." P-371/2

Image P-371/3

Portrait of unidentified man. #00371, Series: "6. Pictures, undated." P-371/3

Image P-371/4

Portrait of unidentified man in Confederate uniform, possibly Henry Rootes Jackson. #00371, Series: "6. Pictures, undated." P-371/4

Image P-371/5

Portrait of unidentified man. #00371, Series: "6. Pictures, undated." P-371/5

Image P-371/6

Portrait of unidentified man. #00371, Series: "6. Pictures, undated." P-371/6

Image P-371/7

Portrait of unidentified man. #00371, Series: "6. Pictures, undated." P-371/7

Image P-371/8

Portrait of unidentified woman. #00371, Series: "6. Pictures, undated." P-371/8

Image P-371/9

Portrait of unidentified man. #00371, Series: "6. Pictures, undated." P-371/9

Image P-371/10

Portrait of unidentified woman. #00371, Series: "6. Pictures, undated." P-371/10

Image P-371/11

Portrait of unidentified man. #00371, Series: "6. Pictures, undated." P-371/11

Special Format Image SF-P-371/12

Tintype of unidentified woman. #00371, Series: "6. Pictures, undated." SF-P-371/12

Image P-371/13

Picture of home of Thomas Reade Rootes II at Federal Hill, Fredericksburg, Virginia. #00371, Series: "6. Pictures, undated." P-371/13

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse 2. Prince Family Papers, 1784-1947.

About 950 items.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 7. Correspondence, 1830-1926.

About 370 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Personal and business correspondence of Oliver Hillhouse Prince, family correspondence of his wife Sarah Jackson Prince, and personal correspondence of his children, especially his daughter Basiline, and of Basiline's cousin Margaret P. Hillhouse.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 7.1. 1830-1849.

About items.

Personal and business correspondence of Oliver Hillhouse Prince from his youth through his editorship of the Georgia Telegraph and his service in the Mexican War. Prince's primary correspondent between 1830 and 1843 was his uncle and guardian, Washington Poe. Letters exchanged while Prince was a student at Dr. Beaman's School (Milledgeville, Ga.) and Yale College (Va.) often concern his education, finances, and career plans. Prince also received scattered letters from friends.

Most of the correspondence for 1844 through early 1847 concerns state and national politics. As a newspaper editor, Prince received frequent reports regarding the issues of the day, including James K. Polk's defeat of Henry Clay, the annexation of Texas, and the onset of the Mexican War. Letters from friends and contacts often comment on the political climate of various regions, provide results of local elections, and give personal insights into local and national politics. Prince also received routine office and scattered personal correspondence during these years. John B. Lamar and Sam Ray were the friends who wrote most often. Of note for the year 1845 are two letters (5 May and 5 June) concerning Prince's hiring of a slave named Jefferson to work in his print shop.

No correspondence appears for 1846, and only five letters appear for the years 1847 to 1849. These concern family, Prince's role in the army, and politics. No letters appear for 1850 through 1851. Undated correspondence for this period includes discussion of Oliver's education, politics, and family news.

Folder 132

1830-1843 #00371, Subseries: "7.1. 1830-1849." Folder 132

Folder 133

1844 #00371, Subseries: "7.1. 1830-1849." Folder 133

Folder 134

January-June 1845 #00371, Subseries: "7.1. 1830-1849." Folder 134

Folder 135

July 1845, 1847-1849 #00371, Subseries: "7.1. 1830-1849." Folder 135

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 7.2. 1852-1873.

About 130 items.

Almost all family correspondence with scattered business letters. Between 1852 and 1858 the bulk of the correspondence belongs to Sarah (Jackson) Prince. Frequent writers were her cousins Mary Ann Cobb and Laura Battaile Cobb, her mother Martha (Rootes) Cobb Jackson, and her nephew Joseph Jackson. Topics include Sarah's marriage, family news and events, religious happenings, and daily plantation life. The handful of letters received by Oliver Prince for this period concern politics, family news, and plantation affairs.

A gap appears in the correspondence for 1859 and for 1861 and 1862, followed by scattered letters for 1863 and 1864. These include correspondence between Prince and his wife and children, especially his daughter Basiline, while he worked conscripting soldiers in Baker County and his family resided in Bath (outside Augusta). The letters express Prince's anxiety about his family's safety and report developments of the war. Several business letters also appear.

For the late 1860s through the mid-1870s most of the letters are those exchanged between Oliver, Sarah, and Basiline, while Oliver lived on his plantation in Macon and his family resided in Bath, and later while Basiline and Marie Jacqueline lived in Atlanta. These letters often concern religion, farming, education, freedmen, and postwar fears and hardships. Of special note is a 24 September 1869 letter to Prince from W. H. Sparks concerning the circumstances surrounding the 1825 Georgia gubernatorial election.

Folder 136

1852-1853 #00371, Subseries: "7.2. 1852-1873." Folder 136

Folder 137

1854 #00371, Subseries: "7.2. 1852-1873." Folder 137

Folder 138

1855-ca. 1860 #00371, Subseries: "7.2. 1852-1873." Folder 138

Folder 139

1862-1865 #00371, Subseries: "7.2. 1852-1873." Folder 139

Folder 140

1866-1873 #00371, Subseries: "7.2. 1852-1873." Folder 140

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 7.3. 1874-1926.

About 140 items.

Mostly the correspondence of Basiline Prince and her cousin Margaret P. Hillhouse. Both women exhibited a passion for genealogical research and wrote frequently to near and distant relatives of the Prince, Hillhouse, Cobb, Jackson, King, Green, Bulloch, Thomas, and other families concerning their lineage. Basiline also carried on personal correspondence with her family, including her father, her sister Marie Jacqueline, her brothers Oliver and Henry, her cousin Mildred Lewis Rutherford, and various other cousins. Almost all the correspondence between 1918 and 1926 belongs to Margaret Hillhouse and concerns family genealogy.

Folder 141

1874-1889 #00371, Subseries: "7.3. 1874-1926." Folder 141

Folder 142

1890-1910 #00371, Subseries: "7.3. 1874-1926." Folder 142

Folder 143

1911-1917 #00371, Subseries: "7.3. 1874-1926." Folder 143

Folder 144

1918 #00371, Subseries: "7.3. 1874-1926." Folder 144

Folder 145

1919 #00371, Subseries: "7.3. 1874-1926." Folder 145

Folder 146

1920-1926 and undated #00371, Subseries: "7.3. 1874-1926." Folder 146

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 8. Financial and Legal Papers, 1808-1897.

About 300 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

The financial and legal papers of Oliver H. Prince, including scattered legal papers of his father and of Washington Poe. The financial papers consist mostly of bills and receipts. They include Prince's personal accounts with clothiers, sundries merchants, and others for the periods 1841 through 1843, 1847 through 1849, and 1863 through 1871. (Those for 1847 through 1849 reflect Prince's participation in the Mexican War.) Also included are business accounts for the Georgia Telegraph, 1844-1847, and Prince's plantation accounts with merchants and cotton factors, 1850-1858. For additional information on Prince's plantation finances, see Subcollection 1, Series 2, which documents his dealings with Martha (Rootes) Cobb Jackson. Some documents belonging to Prince may have also been filed there since ownership was not clear.

Legal documents include deeds, legal agreements, loan papers, and other items pertaining primarily to Prince. Of note is a prenuptial property agreement made between Prince and his future wife Sarah Jackson in 1852. A few papers belong to Prince's father (also named Oliver H. Prince), and to Washington Poe, who served as executor of the elder Prince's will.

Folder 147

1808, 1841-1845 #00371, Series: "8. Financial and Legal Papers, 1808-1897." Folder 147

Folder 148

1846-1854 #00371, Series: "8. Financial and Legal Papers, 1808-1897." Folder 148

Folder 149

1888-1897 #00371, Series: "8. Financial and Legal Papers, 1808-1897." Folder 149

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 9. Other Papers, 1784-1947 and undated.

About 270 items.

Genealogical notes and materials, clippings, magazines, pamphlets, and miscellaneous items collected by Prince family members.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 9.1. Genealogical Material, 1784-1947 and undated.

About 210 items.

Notes, clippings, and publications related to the genealogy of the Cobb, Jackson, Jacqueline, Prince, Hillhouse, King, Thornton, Thomas, Green, Rutherford, Barrington, Griswold, Cary, and other related Virginia and Georgia families.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 9.1.1. Notes and Notebooks, 1784-1940 and undated.

About 110 items.

Copious data and notes on family genealogy compiled principally by Basiline Prince and Margaret Hillhouse. Included are detailed genealogical charts, biographical information, and family anecdotes. Considerable additional genealogical information can be found in the correspondence of these two women in Subseries 7.4.

Of particular value is a notebook by Basiline Prince containing genealogical data and handwritten transcriptions of letters and legal documents dating from 1784 to 1814. The transcriptions include the will of Joseph Webber, Henry Jackson's maternal grandfather; correspondence of Henry Jackson with his family; and letters written to Henry's brother Abraham, mostly from family members. Topics of interest are Tom Paine in England, Indian wars in Georgia, an 1803 treaty with the Creek Indians, the issue of paper money, the War of 1812, and Georgia politics. A few of the transcriptions duplicate letters filed in the collection, which are in a rapid state of deterioration.

Folder 150-152

Folder 150

Folder 151

Folder 152

Genealogical notes, 1889-1940 and undated #00371, Subseries: "9.1.1. Notes and Notebooks, 1784-1940 and undated." Folder 150-152

Folder 153-154

Folder 153

Folder 154

Genealogical notebooks #00371, Subseries: "9.1.1. Notes and Notebooks, 1784-1940 and undated." Folder 153-154

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 9.1.2. Clippings and Publications, 1839-1947 and undated.

About 80 items.

Clippings and historical and genealogical magazines and pamphlets. The bulk of the clippings cover the 1890s through the 1920s and chiefly concern members of the Prince, Thomas, Jackson, and Cobb families. Several clippings, taken primarily from the Daily Georgian, appear from the 1830s and 1840s. They include editorials, poems, and miscellaneous articles. A few clippings appearing after the 1920s pertain to Jordan S. Thomas of Charlotte, N.C. (husband of Marie Jacqueline Prince), and one clipping from 1947 relates to Henry Rootes Jackson.

Folder 155-157

Folder 155

Folder 156

Folder 157

Genealogical clippings #00371, Subseries: "9.1.2. Clippings and Publications, 1839-1947 and undated." Folder 155-157

Folder 158-161

Folder 158

Folder 159

Folder 160

Folder 161

Genealogical publications #00371, Subseries: "9.1.2. Clippings and Publications, 1839-1947 and undated." Folder 158-161

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 9.2. Miscellaneous Items, 1812, 1838, 1857, 1866-1924 and undated.

About 80 items.

Miscellaneous political and family items. Of interest is a scrapbook kept by Oliver H. Prince, which contains copies of letters, genealogical charts, original letters, clippings, pictures, and other miscellaneous items. In addition to the scrapbook, several items clipped from newspapers, most likely by Oliver Prince, appear concerning political issues. Of note is a series of 1845 clippings from the Daily Georgian about the slavery issue, and an 1862 clipping of a letter Prince sent to an unidentified newspaper concerning the 1825 Troup-Clark contest for governor. Other clippings pertain to politics in the Reconstruction period.

Additional items of political significance are election returns for the 8th district (Baker County, Ga.) probably from the year 1857; a U.S. Senate speech on the tariff issue (1844) delivered by Mr. McDuffie; and an undated handwritten editorial entitled "The State of Government," possibly for use in the Georgia Telegraph.

Other papers include the Prince childrens' school reports and Basiline's early compositions, cards (post, greeting, and calling), and travel maps, brochures, and souvenir ribbons Basiline collected on trips to Virginia (for the Jamestown Exposition of 1907), to Florida (for the Key West Over-the-Sea Railroad Celebration in 1912), to Moretonhampstead, England, and to Wales. Materials from the eulogy presented for Basiline Prince upon her death in 1924 also appear. Also included are Marie Jacqueline (Prince) Thomas's catechism book (1868) and marriage license (1884), and an undated typescript description by Jordan S. Thomas of two Glynn County plantations, Altama and Hopeton, being considered for development as a sportsman's retreat.

Folder 162a

Cards (Calling, post, and greeting) #00371, Subseries: "9.2. Miscellaneous Items, 1812, 1838, 1857, 1866-1924 and undated." Folder 162a

Folder 162b

Clippings, 1839, 1841, 1845, 1862, and undated #00371, Subseries: "9.2. Miscellaneous Items, 1812, 1838, 1857, 1866-1924 and undated." Folder 162b

Folder 163

Miscellaneous items, 1812-1900 #00371, Subseries: "9.2. Miscellaneous Items, 1812, 1838, 1857, 1866-1924 and undated." Folder 163

Folder 164

Miscellaneous items, 1901-1912 #00371, Subseries: "9.2. Miscellaneous Items, 1812, 1838, 1857, 1866-1924 and undated." Folder 164

Folder 165

Miscellaneous items, 1917-1924 and undated #00371, Subseries: "9.2. Miscellaneous Items, 1812, 1838, 1857, 1866-1924 and undated." Folder 165

Folder 166

Travel maps and brochures #00371, Subseries: "9.2. Miscellaneous Items, 1812, 1838, 1857, 1866-1924 and undated." Folder 166

Folder 167-170

Folder 167

Folder 168

Folder 169

Folder 170

Writings of Sarah Prince Thomas Watters, including poems, essays, and columns she produced for the Charlotte Observer, 1915-1916 #00371, Subseries: "9.2. Miscellaneous Items, 1812, 1838, 1857, 1866-1924 and undated." Folder 167-170

Image Folder 2-4

Imagefolder 2

Imagefolder 3

Imagefolder 4

Unidentified pictures circa 1896 from album belonging to Basiline Prince (Acc. 98817). #00371, Subseries: "9.2. Miscellaneous Items, 1812, 1838, 1857, 1866-1924 and undated." 2-4

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Items Separated

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Processing Information

Processed by: Manuscripts Department Staff.

Encoded by: Jackie Dean, August 2007

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