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Collection Number: 03060

Collection Title: John Lipscomb Johnson Papers, 1850-1984

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the section for more information.


expand/collapse Expand/collapse Collection Overview

Size 6.0 feet of linear shelf space (approximately 4700 items)
Abstract Johnson was a native of Virginia, graduate of the University of Virginia, Baptist minister, Confederate chaplain, author, professor of English at the University of Mississippi, president of Mary Sharpe College in Winchester, Tenn., and of Hillman College in Clinton, Miss., and planter near Duck Hill, Miss. His son, John Lipscomb Johnson, Jr. (1869- 1932), was the first president of Mississippi Woman's College. Correspondence and other papers of John Lipscomb Johnson, including correspondence of John Lipscomb Johnson, Jr., and the latter's children, Cecil Johnson (b. 1900) and Rachel Johnson (b. 1903). Many letters discuss family matters, social events, and daily activities in Mississippi and Tennessee. Correspondence and other items document Johnson's service at the University of Mississippi and Mary Sharpe College; his compilation of biographies of University of Virginia graduates killed in the Civil War; involvements of members of the Johnson family with Southern Baptist churches; social and academic activities of students at Mississippi Woman's College, 1910s-1930s; Cecil Johnson's career teaching history, primarily at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill; Rachel Johnson's career with the Associated Press in Geneva, Switzerland, in the 1930s and with the U.S. Office of Strategic Services in Italy and North Africa in 1943 and 1945; and other, largely family, matters.
Creator Johnson, John Lipscomb, 1835-1915.
Language English
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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Information For Users

Restrictions to Access
No restrictions. Open for research.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the John Lipscomb Johnson Papers #3060, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Acquisitions Information
Received from Cecil S. Johnson of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 1954, October 1965, and June 1970; and from Waller Batson of Arlington, Virginia, in November 1987.
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subject Headings

The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Biographical Information

John Lipscomb Johnson (1835-1915), an educator and Baptist minister, was born in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, the son of Lewis Johnson (1800-1853) and Jane Dabney Johnson (1800-1863). He was one of at least five children that the couple raised at Forest Hill, the family plantation.

In 1854, Johnson began his studies at the University of Virginia. He was graduated in 1860, and, on 10 June of that year, was ordained in Charlottesville as a minister in Southern Baptist churches. One month after his ordination, Johnson married Julia Anna Toy in Norfolk. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he enlisted as chaplain of the 17th Virginia Infantry. Later, he served as a hospital chaplain in Lynchburg.

Following the war, Johnson preached in Baltimore, Maryland, and in Portsmouth, Lynchburg, and other towns in Virginia. He also held various offices in the Southern Baptist Convention and assisted in raising money for Richmond College. To honor his alma mater, he compiled the University Memorial Biographical Sketches of Alumni of the University of Virginia Who Fell in the Confederate War (Baltimore: Turnbull Brothers, 1871).

In 1873, Johnson moved with his wife and two children to Oxford, Mississippi, where he taught English at the University of Mississippi. He taught at Oxford, preaching on Sundays, for sixteen years, until he and four other professors were dismissed in 1889 after a feud with the chancellor, Alexander Peter Stewart (1821-1908).

Johnson then took his family to Tennessee, where he was president of Mary Sharp College in Winchester. After two years, he again became embroiled in controversy and left his position.

The next stop was Columbia, Mississippi, where Johnson was pastor of the First Baptist Church. In 1896, he resigned as pastor and retired to the "Purnell Place," two miles from Duck Hill. He enjoyed an active retirement, writing articles, preaching, and working within the church hierarchy. For a short time, he served as president of Hillman College for Young Women. He died in 1915.

Six of Johnson's children reached adulthood: Julia Toy, Crawford Toy, John Lipscomb, Jr., Jessie Rosalind, Wortley Valentine, and Mary Rawlings. John Lipscomb, Jr. (1869-1932), followed most closely in his father's footsteps. Shortly after marrying Sue Bell Moody in Georgia, Johnson moved to Mississippi. There his responsibilities included teaching at Georgia Normal and Industrial College in Milledgeville, acting as chair of the Laymen's Executive Committee of the Mississippi Baptist Convention, and serving as mayor of Clinton. With the help of the Convention, Johnson became president of the Mississippi Woman's College in Hattiesburg, where he guided the college through its formative years.

The Johnsons had five children reaching adulthood: Cecil Slaton, Rachel, Julia Toy, Jacqueline van Roden, and Sue Bell. Cecil (b. 1900) studied at Yale University and at the University of Virginia. He taught at the Tunica Agricultural High School in Mississippi, Wake Forest College, Limestone College in Gaffney, South Carolina, and the University of North Carolina. Most of his career was spent in the History Department at Chapel Hill. (See the CECIL S. JOHNSON PAPERS, #3806, in the Southern Historical Collection).

Rachel (b. 1903) worked first as a teacher and then joined the Associated Press in Europe, operating primarily out of Geneva, Switzerland. During World War II, she joined the WACs, serving in the Office of Strategic Service in Italy and North Africa. After the war, she married Waller Batson and lived in Washington, D.C.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Scope and Content

The papers are chiefly correspondence of John Lipscomb Johnson, John Lipscomb Johnson, Jr., and the latter's children, Cecil and Rachel. Many of the letters discuss family matters, social events, and daily activities. Much correspondence has to do with education, having been written by one of the Johnsons as a student, professor, or school administrator. Scant documentation of John Lipcomb Johnson's military career is included. There is, however, a significant number of items pertaining to his granddaughter Rachel's WAC activities during World War II.

Also included are financial and legal materials, writings of various family members in the form of speeches, poetry, or personal narratives, printed items, and pictures.

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Contents list

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series Quick Links

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 1. Correspondence, 1850-1984 and undated.

About 4050 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Chiefly correspondence between members of the Johnson family. Also included are professional letters relating to Baptist affairs and to education. Of particular interest are letters in the 1890s relating to the outbreak of yellow fever in Mississippi and those in the 1930s and 1940s about Rachel Johnson's career. Letters throughout document the family's long-standing interest in women's education.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1850-1899.

Correspondence in this period relates chiefly to John Lipscomb Johnson and his son John Lipscomb Johnson, Jr. The elder Johnson wrote of compiling biographies of University of Virginia graduates who died during the Civil War (see also Subseries 3.1), and of serving as professor at the University of Mississippi and president of Mary Sharp College. The younger Johnson wrote about his courtship of Sue Bell Moody, about yellow fever in Mississippi, and about the Georgia Normal and Industrial College.

Folder 1

1850-1868 #03060, Subseries: "1850-1899." Folder 1

Folder 2-3

Folder 2

Folder 3

1869 #03060, Subseries: "1850-1899." Folder 2-3

Folder 4

1870-1879 #03060, Subseries: "1850-1899." Folder 4

Folder 5

1880-1883 #03060, Subseries: "1850-1899." Folder 5

Folder 6

1884-1885 #03060, Subseries: "1850-1899." Folder 6

Folder 7-8

Folder 7

Folder 8

1886 #03060, Subseries: "1850-1899." Folder 7-8

Folder 9

1887 #03060, Subseries: "1850-1899." Folder 9

Folder 10-12

Folder 10

Folder 11

Folder 12

1888 #03060, Subseries: "1850-1899." Folder 10-12

Folder 13-18

Folder 13

Folder 14

Folder 15

Folder 16

Folder 17

Folder 18

1889 #03060, Subseries: "1850-1899." Folder 13-18

Folder 19-23

Folder 19

Folder 20

Folder 21

Folder 22

Folder 23

1890 #03060, Subseries: "1850-1899." Folder 19-23

Folder 24

1891 #03060, Subseries: "1850-1899." Folder 24

Folder 25-26

Folder 25

Folder 26

1892 #03060, Subseries: "1850-1899." Folder 25-26

Folder 27

1893-1896 #03060, Subseries: "1850-1899." Folder 27

Folder 28-34

Folder 28

Folder 29

Folder 30

Folder 31

Folder 32

Folder 33

Folder 34

1897 #03060, Subseries: "1850-1899." Folder 28-34

Folder 35-43

Folder 35

Folder 36

Folder 37

Folder 38

Folder 39

Folder 40

Folder 41

Folder 42

Folder 43

1898 #03060, Subseries: "1850-1899." Folder 35-43

Folder 44

1899 #03060, Subseries: "1850-1899." Folder 44

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1900-1919.

In this decade, John Lipscomb Johnson, Jr., continued to write about his involvement with higher education and with Southern Baptist churches. During this time, he was vice-president of Hillman College for Young Women and, later, president of Mississippi Woman's College (see also Subseries 4.1). Also included are family letters from Johnson's wife to her relatives in Georgia, letters from soldiers during World War I, and Johnson's remarks about his trip to Europe in 1907.

Folder 45

1900 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 45

Folder 46-47

Folder 46

Folder 47

1901 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 46-47

Folder 48

1902 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 48

Folder 49

1903 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 49

Folder 50

1904 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 50

Folder 51

1905 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 51

Folder 52

1906 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 52

Folder 53-57

Folder 53

Folder 54

Folder 55

Folder 56

Folder 57

1907 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 53-57

Folder 58

1908 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 58

Folder 59

1909 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 59

Folder 60-67

Folder 60

Folder 61

Folder 62

Folder 63

Folder 64

Folder 65

Folder 66

Folder 67

1910 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 60-67

Folder 68

1911 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 68

Folder 69-73

Folder 69

Folder 70

Folder 71

Folder 72

Folder 73

1912 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 69-73

Folder 74-75

Folder 74

Folder 75

1913 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 74-75

Folder 76-78

Folder 76

Folder 77

Folder 78

1914 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 76-78

Folder 79-80

Folder 79

Folder 80

1915 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 79-80

Folder 81-84

Folder 81

Folder 82

Folder 83

Folder 84

1916 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 81-84

Folder 85-86

Folder 85

Folder 86

1917 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 85-86

Folder 87-94

Folder 87

Folder 88

Folder 89

Folder 90

Folder 91

Folder 92

Folder 93

Folder 94

1918 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 87-94

Folder 95-103

Folder 95

Folder 96

Folder 97

Folder 98

Folder 99

Folder 100

Folder 101

Folder 102

Folder 103

1919 #03060, Subseries: "1900-1919." Folder 95-103

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1920-1929.

During this period, the children of John Lipscomb Johnson, Jr., reached maturity and left Mississippi. Johnson himself remained at Mississippi Woman's College, from which he wrote letters about the social and academic activities of the students. He also wrote about his work with the Southern Baptist Convention.

Folder 104-109

Folder 104

Folder 105

Folder 106

Folder 107

Folder 108

Folder 109

1920 #03060, Subseries: "1920-1929." Folder 104-109

Folder 110-113

Folder 110

Folder 111

Folder 112

Folder 113

1921 #03060, Subseries: "1920-1929." Folder 110-113

Folder 114-118

Folder 114

Folder 115

Folder 116

Folder 117

Folder 118

1922 #03060, Subseries: "1920-1929." Folder 114-118

Folder 119-125

Folder 119

Folder 120

Folder 121

Folder 122

Folder 123

Folder 124

Folder 125

1923 #03060, Subseries: "1920-1929." Folder 119-125

Folder 126-138

Folder 126

Folder 127

Folder 128

Folder 129

Folder 130

Folder 131

Folder 132

Folder 133

Folder 134

Folder 135

Folder 136

Folder 137

Folder 138

1924 #03060, Subseries: "1920-1929." Folder 126-138

Folder 139-144

Folder 139

Folder 140

Folder 141

Folder 142

Folder 143

Folder 144

1925 #03060, Subseries: "1920-1929." Folder 139-144

Folder 145-152

Folder 145

Folder 146

Folder 147

Folder 148

Folder 149

Folder 150

Folder 151

Folder 152

1926 #03060, Subseries: "1920-1929." Folder 145-152

Folder 153-162

Folder 153

Folder 154

Folder 155

Folder 156

Folder 157

Folder 158

Folder 159

Folder 160

Folder 161

Folder 162

1927 #03060, Subseries: "1920-1929." Folder 153-162

Folder 163-177

Folder 163

Folder 164

Folder 165

Folder 166

Folder 167

Folder 168

Folder 169

Folder 170

Folder 171

Folder 172

Folder 173

Folder 174

Folder 175

Folder 176

Folder 177

1928 #03060, Subseries: "1920-1929." Folder 163-177

Folder 178-186

Folder 178

Folder 179

Folder 180

Folder 181

Folder 182

Folder 183

Folder 184

Folder 185

Folder 186

1929 #03060, Subseries: "1920-1929." Folder 178-186

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1930-1939.

Depression era letters continue the same themes as the previous decade. John Lipscomb Johnson, Jr., remained at Mississippi Woman's College, and Cecil Johnson wrote from various academic posts, including Yale University and the University of North Carolina. Letters document Rachel Johnson's work with the Associated Press in Geneva, Switzerland, and also with the Inter American Commission of Women (see also Subseries 4.2).

Folder 187-191

Folder 187

Folder 188

Folder 189

Folder 190

Folder 191

1930 #03060, Subseries: "1930-1939." Folder 187-191

Folder 192-201

Folder 192

Folder 193

Folder 194

Folder 195

Folder 196

Folder 197

Folder 198

Folder 199

Folder 200

Folder 201

1931 #03060, Subseries: "1930-1939." Folder 192-201

Folder 202-211

Folder 202

Folder 203

Folder 204

Folder 205

Folder 206

Folder 207

Folder 208

Folder 209

Folder 210

Folder 211

1932 #03060, Subseries: "1930-1939." Folder 202-211

Folder 212-216

Folder 212

Folder 213

Folder 214

Folder 215

Folder 216

1933 #03060, Subseries: "1930-1939." Folder 212-216

Folder 217-219

Folder 217

Folder 218

Folder 219

1934 #03060, Subseries: "1930-1939." Folder 217-219

Folder 220-223

Folder 220

Folder 221

Folder 222

Folder 223

1935 #03060, Subseries: "1930-1939." Folder 220-223

Folder 224-228

Folder 224

Folder 225

Folder 226

Folder 227

Folder 228

1936 #03060, Subseries: "1930-1939." Folder 224-228

Folder 229-232

Folder 229

Folder 230

Folder 231

Folder 232

1937 #03060, Subseries: "1930-1939." Folder 229-232

Folder 233-237

Folder 233

Folder 234

Folder 235

Folder 236

Folder 237

1938 #03060, Subseries: "1930-1939." Folder 233-237

Folder 238-242

Folder 238

Folder 239

Folder 240

Folder 241

Folder 242

1939 #03060, Subseries: "1930-1939." Folder 238-242

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1940-1984.

In this period, letters document the family's continued association with Mississippi Woman's College and Southern Baptist churches after the death of John Lipscomb Johnson, Jr., in 1932. Cecil Johnson continued to write from the University of North Carolina. There is a great deal of correspondence in 1943 and 1945 from Rachel Johnson, serving in the Office of Strategic Services in Europe and North Africa. Her letters give a detailed view of her World War II experiences. Also included are wartime letters from other soldiers, and, after the war, letters from friends at Georgia State College for Women and St. Mary's College in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Folder 243-247

Folder 243

Folder 244

Folder 245

Folder 246

Folder 247

1940 #03060, Subseries: "1940-1984." Folder 243-247

Folder 248-253

Folder 248

Folder 249

Folder 250

Folder 251

Folder 252

Folder 253

1941 #03060, Subseries: "1940-1984." Folder 248-253

Folder 254-256

Folder 254

Folder 255

Folder 256

1942 #03060, Subseries: "1940-1984." Folder 254-256

Folder 257-258

Folder 257

Folder 258

1943 #03060, Subseries: "1940-1984." Folder 257-258

Folder 259-260

Folder 259

Folder 260

1944 #03060, Subseries: "1940-1984." Folder 259-260

Folder 261-262

Folder 261

Folder 262

1945 #03060, Subseries: "1940-1984." Folder 261-262

Folder 263-265

Folder 263

Folder 264

Folder 265

1946 #03060, Subseries: "1940-1984." Folder 263-265

Folder 266-270

Folder 266

Folder 267

Folder 268

Folder 269

Folder 270

1947 #03060, Subseries: "1940-1984." Folder 266-270

Folder 271-274

Folder 271

Folder 272

Folder 273

Folder 274

1948 #03060, Subseries: "1940-1984." Folder 271-274

Folder 275-278

Folder 275

Folder 276

Folder 277

Folder 278

1949 #03060, Subseries: "1940-1984." Folder 275-278

Folder 279-281

Folder 279

Folder 280

Folder 281

1950 #03060, Subseries: "1940-1984." Folder 279-281

Folder 282-283

Folder 282

Folder 283

1951 #03060, Subseries: "1940-1984." Folder 282-283

Folder 284-286

Folder 284

Folder 285

Folder 286

1952 #03060, Subseries: "1940-1984." Folder 284-286

Folder 287-288

Folder 287

Folder 288

1953 #03060, Subseries: "1940-1984." Folder 287-288

Folder 289

1954 #03060, Subseries: "1940-1984." Folder 289

Folder 290

1955 #03060, Subseries: "1940-1984." Folder 290

Folder 291

1956-1957 #03060, Subseries: "1940-1984." Folder 291

Folder 292

1958-1984 #03060, Subseries: "1940-1984." Folder 292

Folder 293-299

Folder 293

Folder 294

Folder 295

Folder 296

Folder 297

Folder 298

Folder 299

Undated #03060, Subseries: "1940-1984." Folder 293-299

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 2. Financial and Legal Materials, 1781-1942.

About 150 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Chiefly Mississippi and Georgia land deeds, teaching certification Papers, and bills and receipts for household items and taxes. The early deeds are for property in Oglethorpe County, Georgia, and relate to Sue Bell Moody Johnson's family. Of interest is an agreement between John Lipscomb Johnson and the chancellor of the University of Mississippi concerning the 1889 dispute that eventually sent Johnson packing.

Folder 300

1781-1830 #03060, Series: "2. Financial and Legal Materials, 1781-1942." Folder 300

Folder 301

1835-1865 #03060, Series: "2. Financial and Legal Materials, 1781-1942." Folder 301

Folder 302

1868-1870 #03060, Series: "2. Financial and Legal Materials, 1781-1942." Folder 302

Folder 303

1872-1880 #03060, Series: "2. Financial and Legal Materials, 1781-1942." Folder 303

Folder 304

1881-1894 #03060, Series: "2. Financial and Legal Materials, 1781-1942." Folder 304

Folder 305

1898-1901 #03060, Series: "2. Financial and Legal Materials, 1781-1942." Folder 305

Folder 306

1903-1904 #03060, Series: "2. Financial and Legal Materials, 1781-1942." Folder 306

Folder 307

1905-1915 #03060, Series: "2. Financial and Legal Materials, 1781-1942." Folder 307

Folder 308

1916-1920 #03060, Series: "2. Financial and Legal Materials, 1781-1942." Folder 308

Folder 309

1921-1925 #03060, Series: "2. Financial and Legal Materials, 1781-1942." Folder 309

Folder 310

1926-1928 #03060, Series: "2. Financial and Legal Materials, 1781-1942." Folder 310

Folder 311

1929-1931 #03060, Series: "2. Financial and Legal Materials, 1781-1942." Folder 311

Folder 312

1932-1942 #03060, Series: "2. Financial and Legal Materials, 1781-1942." Folder 312

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 3. Writings.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.1. University of Virginia Biographies, 1868-1871.

About 120 items.

Arrangement: alphabetical.

Handwritten versions of short biographical sketches gathered by John Lipscomb Johnson for his monograph on University of Virginia students who died during the Civil War.

Folder 313-322

Folder 313

Folder 314

Folder 315

Folder 316

Folder 317

Folder 318

Folder 319

Folder 320

Folder 321

Folder 322

University of Virginia Biographies, 1868-1871 #03060, Subseries: "3.1. University of Virginia Biographies, 1868-1871." Folder 313-322

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.2. Speeches, 1910-1935 and undated.

About 50 items.

Chiefly speeches, drafts, and notes of John Lipscomb Johnson, relating to his activities with Southern Baptist churches.

Folder 323-326

Folder 323

Folder 324

Folder 325

Folder 326

Speeches, 1910-1935 and undated #03060, Subseries: "3.2. Speeches, 1910-1935 and undated." Folder 323-326

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.3. Poetry, 1890-1950 and undated.

About 200 items.

Chiefly handwritten versions of poems composed by Rachel Johnson, Sue Bell Moody Johnson, and John Lipscomb Johnson, Jr., some of which were later published.

Folder 327

1890-1929 #03060, Subseries: "3.3. Poetry, 1890-1950 and undated." Folder 327

Folder 328

1930-1950 #03060, Subseries: "3.3. Poetry, 1890-1950 and undated." Folder 328

Folder 329-337

Folder 329

Folder 330

Folder 331

Folder 332

Folder 333

Folder 334

Folder 335

Folder 336

Folder 337

Undated #03060, Subseries: "3.3. Poetry, 1890-1950 and undated." Folder 329-337

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.4. Personal Narrative, Undated.

1 item.

Typed version of Rachel Johnson's "North Africa in Wartime" (apparently never published), in which she describes her service with the WACs during World War II.

Folder 338

Personal Narrative, Undated #03060, Subseries: "3.4. Personal Narrative, Undated." Folder 338

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 4. Other Papers.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 4.1. Mississippi Woman's College, 1909-1920.

About 90 items.

Arrangement: by type.

Clippings, brochures, and short histories relating to Mississippi Woman's College.

Folder 339-341

Folder 339

Folder 340

Folder 341

Mississippi Woman's College, 1909-1920 #03060, Subseries: "4.1. Mississippi Woman's College, 1909-1920." Folder 339-341

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 4.2. Printed Material, 1887-1960.

About 60 items.

Newspaper and magazine clippings, programs, menus, and flyers relating to John Lipscomb Johnson, John Lipscomb Johnson, Jr., Southern Baptist churches, and educational institutions. Also included are two issues of The Swiss Monthly, which contain a two-part article on Rachel Johnson's 1931 bicycle tour of Switzerland.

Folder 342

Baptist Church #03060, Subseries: "4.2. Printed Material, 1887-1960." Folder 342

Folder 343

Education #03060, Subseries: "4.2. Printed Material, 1887-1960." Folder 343

Folder 344

John Lipscomb Johnson, Jr. #03060, Subseries: "4.2. Printed Material, 1887-1960." Folder 344

Folder 345

Cecil Johnson #03060, Subseries: "4.2. Printed Material, 1887-1960." Folder 345

Folder 346

Rachel Johnson #03060, Subseries: "4.2. Printed Material, 1887-1960." Folder 346

Folder 347

Miscellaneous #03060, Subseries: "4.2. Printed Material, 1887-1960." Folder 347

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 4.3. Miscellaneous Items, 1870-1940.

About 60 items.

Materials on genealogy, religion, education, and other topics. The religious material relates to John Lipscomb Johnson's participation in the Baptist Association Convention in Virginia. The educational material pertains to the Georgia Normal and Industrial College, the University of North Carolina, and other schools.

Folder 348

Genealogy #03060, Subseries: "4.3. Miscellaneous Items, 1870-1940." Folder 348

Folder 349

Religion #03060, Subseries: "4.3. Miscellaneous Items, 1870-1940." Folder 349

Folder 350

Education #03060, Subseries: "4.3. Miscellaneous Items, 1870-1940." Folder 350

Folder 351

Miscellaneous #03060, Subseries: "4.3. Miscellaneous Items, 1870-1940." Folder 351

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 5. Volumes, 1891-1958.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 6. Pictures.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Items Separated

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Processing Information

Processed by: Ben Trask, November 1986; Roslyn Holdzkom, July 1988

Encoded by: ByteManagers Inc., 2008

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