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Collection Number: 00868-z

Collection Title: Henry Armand London Papers, 1862-1887

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the section for more information.


This collection was processed with support from the Randleigh Foundation Trust. Funding from the State Library of North Carolina supported the encoding of this finding aid.

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Size 8 items
Abstract Henry Armand London of Pittsboro, N.C., was a journalist and lawyer who attended the University of North Carolina until 1864 when he joined the Confederate army. After the war, he returned to Pittsboro, where he was involved in many business ventures and in community activities. He served as UNC trustee, 1901-1917. The collection includes a diary with entries July 1862-November 1863 and July-November 1864 kept by Henry Armand London while he was a student at the University of North Carolina; accounts and miscellaneous memoranda, 1867-1877, included in one of the diary volumes; five letters, February 1864-March 1865, written by London from Chapel Hill, N.C., and with the 32nd North Carolina Infantry Regiment near Richmond; and an 1887 Confederate Memorial Day oration by London. The diaries include brief accounts of the weather, recitations, drinking, practical jokes, dental treatments, and other aspects of student life at UNC and life in Chapel Hill. One letter, 16 February 1864, describes a posse of UNC students breaking up a camp of runaway slaves and officers rounding up freshmen and sophomores to take to the conscription offices in Raleigh, N.C. Other letters describe life in the Confederate army.
Creator London, Henry Armand, 1846-1918.
Language English
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Restrictions to Access
No restrictions. Open for research.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the Henry Armand London Papers #868-z, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Acquisitions Information
Received from Mrs. John Anderson of Raleigh, N.C., in July 1944; Mrs. Fred Jerome of Pittsboro, N.C., in December 1959; and George London of Raleigh, N.C., in August 1977 and October 1992.
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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Henry Armand London, journalist and lawyer, was born in Pittsboro, N.C., the son of Henry Adolphus and Sally Lord London. He attended the Pittsboro Academny before entering the sophomore class at the University of North Carolina in July 1862. He left UNC in the first session of his senior year to join the Confederate army in November 1864. Serving as a courier in Company I of the 32nd North Carolina Infantry Regiment, he participated in one of the last actions of the Civil War in carrying the message to General William R. Cox to cease firing because Robert E. Lee had just surrendered.

After the war, London received a B.A. from UNC and returned to Pittsboro to read law under John Manning. In 1878, he founded the Chatham Record, a weekly newspaper that he edited and published until his death. He was active in many business ventures and in community activities. He served as UNC trustee, 1901-1917, and received an honorary M.A. degree in 1911.

In 1875, London married Bettie Louise Jackson (1853-1930), granddaughter of North Carolina Governor Jonathan Worth. The couple had eight children.

(Adapted from an entry by Claiborne T. Smith, Jr., in the Dictionary of North Carolina Biography (UNC Press, 1991).)

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The collection includes a diary with entries July 1862-November 1863 and July-November 1864 kept by Henry Armand London, lawyer and journalist, of Pittsboro, N.C., while he was a student at the University of North Carolina; accounts and miscellaneous memoranda, 1867-1877, included in one of the diary volumes; five letters, February 1864-March 1865, written by London from Chapel Hill, N.C., and with the 32nd North Carolina Infantry Regiment near Richmond, Va., during the Civil War; and an 1887 Confederate Memorial Day oration by London. The diaries include brief accounts of the weather, recitations, drinking, practical jokes, dental treatments, and other aspects of student life at UNC and life in Chapel Hill. One letter, 16 February 1864, describes a posse of UNC students breaking up a camp of runaway slaves and officers rounding up freshmen and sophomores to take to the conscription offices in Raleigh, N.C. Other letters describe life in the Confederate army.

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Contents list

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Papers, 1862-1877, 1887.

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OP-868/1

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Processing Information

Processed by: Suzanne Ruffing, August 1996

Encoded by: Mara Dabrishus, September 2004

Updated by: Kathryn Michaelis, December 2009

This collection was processed with support from the Randleigh Foundation Trust.

Funding from the State Library of North Carolina supported the encoding of this finding aid.

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