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Collection Number: 01970

Collection Title: John Manning Papers, 1829-1899

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the FAQ section for more information.


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Size 1.0 feet of linear shelf space (approximately 180 items)
Abstract John Manning was a lawyer of Pittsboro, N.C.; U.S. representative from North Carolina; and professor of law at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The collection includes correspondence, financial and legal items, drafts of speeches and articles, and teaching notes. Papers pertain to Manning's work as a lawyer, as receiver for the Confederate States of America, and as a law professor at the University of North Carolina, including his commentary on Blackstone, which he used in teaching; and to Manning's wife, Louise Hall Manning.
Creator Manning, John, 1830-1899.
Language English
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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Information For Users

Restrictions to Access
No restrictions. Open for research.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the John Manning Papers #1970, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Acquisitions Information
Memorial resolution from former law students accessioned 1944. Volumes from North Carolina Room 1952. 1957 addition from John T. Manning. 1958 addition from John T. Manning through Lawrence London. 1970 addition from John R. Woodard. 1986 addition from Lawrence London. 1987 addition from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Law Library.
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subject Headings

The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Biographical Information

John Manning was born on 30 July 1830, at Edenton, North Carolina, the son of United States naval captain, John Manning. He was graduated from the University of North Carolina in 1850, was licensed to practice law in 1853, and settled in Pittsboro, North Carolina, where he married Louisa J. Hall in 1856. While serving as first lieutenant of the "Chatham Rifles" in 1861, Manning was elected delegate to the Secession Convention; he was appointed as a receiver of the Confederate States of America later that year.

In 1870, Manning was elected to the 41st Congress to complete the unexpired term of John T. Deweese. In 1880, he served in the state legislature, where he introduced the first bill to provide an annual state appropriation for the University of North Carolina. In 1881, Manning was elected professor of law at the University, a position he held, while maintaining a private law practice, until his death in 1899.

Among his seven children were: Issac Hall Manning, Dean of the University of North Carolina Medical School, 1905-1933, and James Smith Manning, N. C. Attorney General and Associate Justice of the State Supreme Court.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Scope and Content

Most of the collection consists of correspondence. Several letters are addressed to persons other than John Manning. These persons are sometimes, but not always, members of the Manning family. After 1899, the correspondence becomes almost exclusively letters from family members and merchants to Louisa Manning.

Several legal and financial items touch on slavery matters, while others are related to Manning's position as a receiver for the Confederate States of America.

The material on the University of North Carolina consists primarily of drafts and copies of letters, articles, and speeches by Manning refuting attacks on state funding for the University. There are also some items pertaining to the early days of the Law School.

The volumes contain Manning's commentaries on Blackstone, which were used in his law classes.

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Contents list

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series Quick Links

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 1. Correspondence, 1824-1913 and undated.

About 133 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Chiefly letters to John Manning or his wife. Among early items is a letter from John Pike of Ocracoke, NC, to Thomas Charleton (connection with Manning unknown) with justification for establishment of a lighthouse at Ocracoke (1840). Correspondence of Manning includes: two letters about war progress (1861); copies of two letters from John Manning to Englehard & Saunders about constitutional convention (1874); and copies of two letters from John Manning to Thomas Ruffin about Manning's running for judgeship.

Correspondence after 1899 consists of letters from various family members and merchants to Louisa Manning. These letters concern family life.

Letters relating to the University of North Carolina are in Series 3.

Folder 1

1829-1854 #01970, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1824-1913 and undated." Folder 1

Folder 2

1861-1880 #01970, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1824-1913 and undated." Folder 2

Folder 3

1885-1893 #01970, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1824-1913 and undated." Folder 3

Folder 4

1895-1900 #01970, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1824-1913 and undated." Folder 4

Folder 5

1903 #01970, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1824-1913 and undated." Folder 5

Folder 6

1904 #01970, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1824-1913 and undated." Folder 6

Folder 7

February - September 1905 #01970, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1824-1913 and undated." Folder 7

Folder 8

October 1905 #01970, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1824-1913 and undated." Folder 8

Folder 9

November 1905 #01970, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1824-1913 and undated." Folder 9

Folder 10

December 1905, 1906, 1913 #01970, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1824-1913 and undated." Folder 10

Folder 11

undated #01970, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1824-1913 and undated." Folder 11

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 2. Financial and Legal Items, 1833-1865 and undated.

19 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Deeds, agreements, receipts and other items, including documents bearing on slave disputes (1856, 1859); a statement of fees for a doctor's services (1851-52); six items related to John Manning's work as receiver of the Confederate States of America (Pamlico or Albemarle district?), (1861, 1863-65); and five account books noting daily expenditures.

Folder 12

1833-1859 #01970, Series: "2. Financial and Legal Items, 1833-1865 and undated." Folder 12

Folder 13

1861-1865 and undated #01970, Series: "2. Financial and Legal Items, 1833-1865 and undated." Folder 13

Folder 14

Five small account books, 1858-1901 #01970, Series: "2. Financial and Legal Items, 1833-1865 and undated." Folder 14

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 3. University of North Carolina, 1888-1899 and undated.

About 23 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Drafts and copies of letters, speeches, and articles refuting attacks on state funding for higher education (1894), Manning's annual Law Department reports to the University (1896, 1898), and other items.

Folder 15

1888-1899 and undated #01970, Series: "3. University of North Carolina, 1888-1899 and undated." Folder 15

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 4. Volumes

4 items.

Bound typescripts of John Manning's commentaries on Blackstone, which were used in classes he taught at the University of North Carolina.

Folder 16

Volume 1: "On Blackstone," Books 1 and 4 #01970, Series: "4. Volumes" Folder 16

Folder 17

Volume 2: "On Blackstone," Books 2 and 3 #01970, Series: "4. Volumes" Folder 17

Folder 18

Volume 3: "On Blackstone," Books 2, 3, 4 #01970, Series: "4. Volumes" Folder 18

Folder 19

Volume 4: "Notes on First Blackstone and Adams' Equity" copy owned and annotated by William W. Vass Junior #01970, Series: "4. Volumes" Folder 19

(Note: Manning's notes on Blackstone, Book 1, have been published--Chapel Hill: The University Press, 1899.)

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Processing Information

Processed by: Roslyn Holdzkom, September 1986

Encoded by: ByteManagers Inc., 2008

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