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Collection Number: 00508

Collection Title: William Porcher Miles Papers, 1784-1906

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the FAQ section for more information.


Funding from the Watson-Brown Foundation, Inc., supported the encoding of this finding aid; Acc. 100902 was processed with support from Elizabeth Moore Ruffin.

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Size 7.5 feet of linear shelf space (approximately 6,000 items)
Abstract William Porcher Miles (1822-1899) was a South Carolina educator, mayor of Charleston, S.C. (1855-1857), United States Representative (1857-1860), member of the Confederate House of Representatives and chair of its Military Affairs Committee. After the Civil War, he was a planter in Virginia, then president of South Carolina College, then a planter again, this time in Louisiana. Miles married Betty Bierne (d. 1874), the daughter of Oliver Bierne, a wealthy Virginia and Louisiana planter, in 1863. The collection consists of personal, political, and military correspondence; diaries; and a few business papers and clippings of William Porcher Miles. Correspondence with many leading political, military, and intellectual figures of the day discusses slavery and runaway slaves, Jews in Charleston, secession, foreign relations, patronage appointments, appropriations, financial and military preparations for war, defense of coastal and inland South Carolina, Reconstruction economic and social conditions in Charleston, S.C., and perceived effects of citizenship and wages on freedmen. Also included are materials relating to Miles and Warley family, friends, and social activities; Miles's work at the College of Charleston; the 1855 yellow fever epidemic in Norfolk, Va.; improvements to the Charleston port, customs house, post office, canals, and statuary; Miles's management of Oak Grove Plantation, Nelson County, Va., and Houmas Plantation, Ascension Parish, La.; his involvement in state and local Democratic Party politics in Louisiana, especially with regard to the lottery, sugar tariff, and sugar bounty; and flood control and levees in the lower Mississippi. The diaries, 1867-1897, contain brief but regular entries and give a general picture of Miles's way of life, indebtedness, political and religious beliefs, and personal relations while running the Oak Grove and Houmas plantations and as college president at Columbia, S.C. Also documented is the 1874 death of Betty Bierne Miles in childbirth. The April 2008 addition consists of a letter, 19 February 1864, written by William Porcher Miles to South Carolina Governor Milledge L. Bonham, concerning use of the blockade runner Alice of Bee and Company to export South Carolina's cotton and his hope for a reform of the Confederate government's control over blockade running.
Creator Miles, William Porcher, 1822-1899.
Language English
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Restrictions to Access
No restrictions. Open for research.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the William Porcher Miles Papers #508, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Alternate Form of Material
Microfilm copy (filmed February 1971 and February 1977) available.
  • Reel 1: folders 1-9
  • Reel 2: folders 10-20
  • Reel 3: folders 21-34
  • Reel 4: folders 35-39
  • Reel 5: typed copies of volumes 20-21, 1886-1887
Acquisitions Information
Received on loan from William P. Miles Jr. in 1938 and 1940. Additions purchased from Charles Hamilton Galleries of New York, N.Y., in January 1973 and from Historical Collectible Auctions in April 2008 (Acc. 100902).
Additional Descriptive Resources
The original finding aid for this collection is filed in folder 1a.
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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William Porcher Miles was born 4 July 1822 in Walterboro, S.C. He was the second of five sons of James Sanders and Sarah Bond Warley Miles. Miles was taught at home with his younger brothers until 1836, when he spent a few months at James B. Waddel's Willington Academy in the Abbeville District, S.C. He entered the College of Charleston in 1838 and graduated four years later with honors. Miles excelled particularly as an orator and in mathematics.

Miles read law in the office of Edward McCrady in Charleston, S.C., for a year, then returned to the College of Charleston as a professor of mathematics. During the summer of 1855, he traveled to Norfolk, Va., to serve as a volunteer nurse in the yellow fever epidemic. When news of his services reached Charleston, friends recalled his gifted oratory, dignified presence, and social position, and wrote laudatory letters that appeared in the Charleston Mercury. While Miles was still in Norfolk, a group of influential Charlestonians nominated him to be the Southern Rights Party candidate for mayor. Miles accepted the nomination, though he remained in Norfolk until two days before the election. He won in a light turnout, resigned his post at the College of Charleston, and was administered the oath of his new office on 9 November 1855.

Miles' political career took another turn the following year when he ran for Congress on the Southern Rights Party ticket. Miles again did not campaign, but was elected by a small majority. During 1857, he concurrently served out his second year as mayor of Charleston and his first year representing the Charleston District, S.C., in Congress. Miles championed slavery and secession and was active in the southern independence movement. During his three years in office, Miles spent most of his time in Washington and immersed himself in the social life there. He shared his bachelor quarters in Washington with other prominent young men, apparently M. R. H. Garnett and Laurence M. Keitt, and possibly others at different times.

Upon resigning from Congress in 1860, Miles served as chair of the committee on foreign relations in the South Carolina secession convention, and signed the Ordinance of Secession. He represented the Charleston district in the Confederate Congress during its entire existence, including the Montgomery, Ala., convention, where Miles seems to have served as the principal South Carolina leader. He played an active role in drawing up the new constitution, making major decisions, and awarding appointments, and he was chair of the Committee on the Flag and chair of the Committee on Military Affairs. In 1861, Miles served briefly as aide-de-camp to General P. G. T. Beauregard.

Miles married Betty Bierne (d. 1874), the daughter of Oliver Bierne, a wealthy Virginia and Louisiana planter, in 1863. From 1865 to 1867, Miles and his family resided in Charleston, but unable to prosper in the depressed post-war conditions, they moved to Oak Grove Plantation in Oakridge, Nelson County, Va., which had been purchased by Oliver Bierne. After Betty died in 1874, Miles and the children stayed on at Oakridge for several more years, with the continued financial support of his father-in-law.

In 1880, William Porcher Miles returned to South Carolina to become president of South Carolina College. He resigned this position in 1882 to manage his father-in-law's recent inheritance, Houmas Plantation (now Burnside) in Ascension Parish, La. Miles became one of the largest planters in the state, controlling at least seven plantations that produced twenty million pounds of sugar annually. He served as president of the Ascension branch of the Louisiana Sugar Planters' Association and was one of the founders of a sugar experiment station and of The Louisiana Planter and Sugar Manufacturer, a weekly newspaper published in New Orleans. Miles continued to be active in state and local political matters, though he did not seek elected office. He opposed the state lottery, the sugar tariff, and other measures of the Republican Party.

Miles died at his home, Houmas House, on 11 May 1899.

See also Ruth McCaskill Daniel's "William Porcher Miles: Champion of Southern Interests," M.A. thesis, University of North Carolina, 1943).

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The collection consists of personal, political, and military correspondence, diaries, and a few business papers and clippings of William Porcher Miles. Papers, 1784-1860, concern Miles and Warley family, friends, and social activities; Jews in Charleston; Miles's work at the College of Charleston; and local, state, and national politics. Political materials relate to Miles's tenure and responsibilities as mayor of Charleston, S.C., then as a United States congressman representing the Charleston district. There is extensive commentary on controversial issues leading to the Civil War, including slavery and runaway slaves, the Kansas-Nebraska bill and various other bills before Congress, the South Carolina Democratic Convention, the national Democratic Party nominating convention, elections, the South Carolina secession convention, anticipated foreign relations, and other problems facing the South as the war approached. Other topics include the 1855 yellow fever epidemic in Norfolk, Va., and improvements to the Charleston port, customs house, post office, canals, and statuary.

Papers, 1861-1865, document many political and military aspects of the Civil War. Topics include appointments and appropriations; secession and the Montgomery, Ala., convention; foreign policy for the Confederacy; financial and military preparations for war; troop morale, health, and logistics; confiscation of property; defense of coastal and inland South Carolina; runaway slaves, the removal of slaves from the low country, and the possible use of slaves as soldiers in the Confederate Army; the disposition of prisoners; and civilian morale in Charleston. Also included are a few letters relating to personal matters, in particular Miles's 1863 marriage to Betty Beirne. The April 2008 addition consists of a letter, 19 February 1864, written by William Porcher Miles to South Carolina Governor Milledge L. Bonham, concerning use of the blockade runner Alice of Bee and Company to export South Carolina's cotton and his hope for a reform of the Confederate government's control over blockade running.

Papers, 1866-1906 and undated, document postwar conditions in Charleston, including economic and social conditions during Reconstruction and perceived effects of citizenship and wages on freedmen. Also included are materials relating to Miles's efforts to find work in an academic setting, first at Johns Hopkins University and then at South Carolina College and the Peabody Educational Fund; his management of Oak Grove Plantation, Oakridge, Nelson County, Va., and Houmas Plantation, Ascension Parish, La.; his involvement in state and local Democratic Party politics in Ascension Parish, La., especially with regard to the lottery, sugar tariff, and sugar bounty; and his leadership role in the Louisiana Sugar Planters Association. There are a few materials relating to flood control and levees in the lower Mississippi and Episcopal Church matters. Also included throughout this period are letters with news of family, friends, and social activities.

The diaries, 1867-1897, consist of daily entries giving a brief resume of the daily activities of Miles and his family, including visits and visitors, debts incurred, bills paid, work on the plantations, and letters written. The diaries give a general picture of Miles's way of life, indebtedness, political and religious beliefs, and personal relations while running the Oak Grove and Houmas plantations and as college president at Columbia, S.C. Also documented is the 1874 death of Betty Bierne Miles in childbirth.

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Contents list

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Papers, 1784-1906.

About 6,000 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

The collection consists of personal, political, and military correspondence, diaries, and a few business papers and clippings of William Porcher Miles (1822-1899). Papers, 1784-1849, concern Miles and Warley family, friends, and social activities, and Miles's work at the College of Charleston. Also included are a few letters of James B. Waddel, headmaster of the Willington Academy in Abbeville District, S.C., reporting on the progress of James Sanders Miles's children and the dismissal of a teacher who advocated "immediate abolition of slavery"; a letter from Samuel I. Legare regarding a Charleston town meeting concerning Jews; and a letter from Reverend S. Gilman inviting Miles to discuss phrenology at a literary club.

Papers, 1850-1860, relate to Miles and Warley family, friends, and social activities; Miles' work at the College of Charleston; and, increasingly, local, state, and national politics. Included are letters discussing the Norfolk yellow fever epidemic; improvements to the Charleston port, customs house, post office, canals, and statuary; Miles's tenure and responsibilities as mayor of Charleston, then as United States congressman representing the Charleston district; comparisons of slavery in the South and Cuba; Governor James H. Adams' desire to re-open slave trade; attitudes of non-southerners toward slavery and the South; a proposed duel between Congressmen Roger Atkinson Pryor and John Fox Potter; and the murder of William J. Keitt by his slaves. There are political commentaries by William H. Trescott, Andrew G. Macgrath, James Henry Hammond, and many other leading figures of the day on the Kansas-Nebraska bill and various other bills before Congress, secession, the South Carolina Democratic Party Convention, the national Democratic nominating convention, elections, the South Carolina secession convention, and other problems facing the South as the war approached inevitability. Also included are several letters relating to the 305 Africans illegally on board The Echo , taken ashore in Charleston and later returned to Africa on the steamer General Clinch.

Papers, 1861-1865, chiefly concern political and military matters. As a representative to the Confederate congress and chair of the Military Affairs Committee, Miles received many requests for favors, appointments, appropriations, and recommendations from his civilian, government, and military constituents. Other subjects include secession and the Montgomery, Ala., convention; foreign policy for the Confederacy; financial and military preparations for war; troop pay, promotions, sickness, transportation, enlistment and conscript laws, transfers from militia to the regular army, and morale impaired by drunkenness and lack of patriotism; military appointments for friends and unqualified persons and other abuses of power; confiscation of property; defense of coastal and inland South Carolina; runaway slaves, the removal of slaves from the low country, and the possible use of slaves as soldiers in the Confederate Army; the disposition of prisoners; making military reports public; securing passes through lines; and civilian morale in Charleston. Also included are a few letters relating to Benjamin F. Evans, who disappeared while bearing dispatches from England to the Confederacy and reappeared after a transcontinental, transoceanic escape from United States troops; a few letters concerning Rachel Johnson, "a free colored person of Indian descent," who was successively involved with a number of Charleston men, and efforts to gain passage for her through the lines to New York; a letter from Amelia Parker about establishing a war relief organization in Virginia; and a few letters relating to personal matters, in particular Miles's 1863 marriage to Betty Beirne. The April 2008 addition consists of a letter, 19 February 1864, written by William Porcher Miles to South Carolina Governor Milledge L. Bonham, concerning use of the blockade runner Alice of Bee and Company to export South Carolina's cotton and his hope for a reform of the Confederate government's control over blockade running.

Papers, 1866-1906 and undated, document postwar conditions in Charleston, including economic and social conditions during Reconstruction, talk of emigration, and perceived effects of citizenship and wages on freedmen. Also included are materials relating to Miles's efforts to find work in an academic setting, first at Johns Hopkins University and then at South Carolina College and the Peabody Educational Fund; his management of Oak Grove Plantation, Oakridge, Nelson County, Va., and Houmas Plantation, Ascension Parish, La.; his involvement in state and local Democratic Party politics in Ascension Parish, La., especially with regard to the lottery, sugar tariff, and sugar bounty; and his leadership role in the Louisiana Sugar Planters Association. There are a few materials relating to flood control and levees in the lower Mississippi and Episcopal church matters. Also included throughout this period are letters with news of family, friends, and social activities.

The diaries, 1867-1897, consist of daily entries of about five lines each, giving a brief resume of the daily activities of Miles and his family, including visits and visitors, debts incurred, bills paid, work on the plantations, and letters written. The diaries give a general picture of Miles's way of life, indebtedness, political and religious beliefs, and personal relations. Also documented is the 1874 death of Betty Bierne Miles in childbirth.

Folder 1a

Finding aid, 1965 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 1a

Includes detailed inventory of correspondents and correspondence

Folder 1b

1784-1839 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 1b

Folder 2

1840-1841 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 2

Folder 3

1842-1843 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 3

Folder 4

1844-1847 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 4

Folder 5

1848-1849 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 5

Folder 6

1850-1854 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 6

Folder 7

1855 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 7

Folder 8

1856 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 8

Folder 9

1857: January-June #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 9

Folder 10

1857: July-September #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 10

Folder 11

1857: November-December #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 11

Folder 12

1858: January #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 12

Folder 13

1858: February #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 13

Folder 14

1858: March #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 14

Folder 15

1858: April #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 15

Folder 16

1858: May-July #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 16

Folder 17

1858: August-September #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 17

Folder 18

1858: October-December #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 18

Folder 19

1859: January-February #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 19

Folder 20

1859: March-April #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 20

Folder 21

1859: May-November #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 21

Folder 22

1859: December 1-20 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 22

Folder 23

1859: December 22-31 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 23

Folder 24

1860: January 1-15 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 24

Folder 25

1860: January 16-30 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 25

Folder 26

1860: February #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 26

Folder 27

1860: March #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 27

Folder 28

1860: April 1-12 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 28

Folder 29

1860: April 13-28 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 29

Folder 30

1860: May #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 30

Folder 31

1860: June-July #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 31

Folder 32

1860: August-October #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 32

Folder 33

1860: November #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 33

Folder 34

1860: December #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 34

Folder 35

1861: January #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 35

Folder 36

1861: February 1-19 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 36

Folder 37

1861: February 20-28 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 37

Folder 38

1861: March 1-12 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 38

Folder 39

1861: March 13-30 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 39

Folder 40

1861: April #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 40

Folder 41

1861: May #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 41

Folder 42

1861: June-July #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 42

Folder 43

1861: August 2-15 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 43

Folder 44

1861: August 16-31 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 44

Folder 45

1861: September-October #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 45

Folder 46

1861: November #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 46

Folder 47

1861: December #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 47

Folder 48

1862: January-February #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 48

Folder 49

1862: March 1-14 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 49

Folder 50

1862: March 15-31 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 50

Folder 51

1862: April-May #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 51

Folder 52

1863-1864 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 52

Includes the April 2008 addition (Acc. 100902): a letter, 19 February 1864, written by William Porcher Miles to South Carolina Governor Milledge L. Bonham, concerning use of the blockade runner Alice of Bee and Company to export South Carolina's cotton and his hope for a reform of the Confederate government's control over blockade running.

Folder 53

1865-1866 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 53

Folder 54

1867-1869 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 54

Folder 55

1870-1871 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 55

Folder 56

1872-1873 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 56

Folder 57

1874: January-July #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 57

Folder 58

1874: August #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 58

Folder 59

1874: September #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 59

Folder 60

1874: October #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 60

Folder 61

1874: November-December #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 61

Folder 62

1875 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 62

Folder 63

1876 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 63

Folder 64

1877 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 64

Folder 65

1878-1879 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 65

Folder 66

1880: January-July #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 66

Folder 67

1880: August-December #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 67

Folder 68

1881: January-March #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 68

Folder 69

1881: April-November #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 69

Folder 70

1882: April-May #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 70

Folder 71

1882: June-December #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 71

Folder 72

1883 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 72

Folder 73

1884 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 73

Folder 74

1885 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 74

Folder 75

1886 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 75

Folder 76

1887 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 76

Folder 77

1888 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 77

Folder 78

1889 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 78

Folder 79

1890: January-June #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 79

Folder 80

1890: July-December #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 80

Folder 81

1891: January-June #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 81

Folder 82

1891: July-December #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 82

Folder 83

1892: January-February #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 83

Folder 84

1892: March #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 84

Folder 85

1892: April-May #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 85

Folder 86

1892: June-October #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 86

Folder 87

1892: November-December #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 87

Folder 88

1893: January-February #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 88

Folder 89

1893: March-April #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 89

Folder 90

1893: May-September #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 90

Folder 91

1893: October-November #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 91

Folder 92

1893: December #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 92

Folder 93

1894: January-February #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 93

Folder 94

1894: March #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 94

Folder 95

1894: April-May #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 95

Folder 96

1894: June-August #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 96

Folder 97

1894: September #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 97

Folder 98

1894: October-November #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 98

Folder 99

1894: December #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 99

Folder 100

1895: January-February #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 100

Folder 101

1895: March-April #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 101

Folder 102

1895: June-November #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 102

Folder 103

1895: December #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 103

Folder 104

1896: January-March #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 104

Folder 105

1896: April-October #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 105

Folder 106

1896: November-December #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 106

Folder 107

1897-1898, 1906 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 107

Folder 108

Undated letters from William Gilmore Simms #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 108

Folder 109

Undated: A-B #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 109

Folder 110

Undated: C-F #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 110

Folder 111

Undated: G-L #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 111

Folder 112

Undated: M-P #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 112

Folder 113

Undated: R-T #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 113

Folder 114

Undated: U-Z #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 114

Folder 115

Undated: signatures illegible #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 115

Folder 116

Newspaper clippings, circa 1854-1895 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 116

Folder 117

Miscellaneous #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 117

Chiefly envelopes; also includes a list of the board of trustees of the Camden Female College in South Carolina; and a report card from the Hanover Academy for W.P. Miles, 1880-1881

Folder 118

Volume 1: 9 November 1867-17 September 1868 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 118

Account of farm in Oak Ridge, Nelson County, Va.; farm records and weather data.

Folder 119

Volume 2: 18 September 1868-31 December 1869 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 119

Oak Ridge, Va.; farm records and weather data.

Folder 120

Volume 3: 1870 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 120

Oak Ridge, Va.; crop failure raises possibility of selling farm at end of year; farm records and weather data.

Folder 121

Volume 4: 1871 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 121

Oak Ridge, Va.; first year of balanced accounts for farm; farm rent for 1872; weather data.

Folder 122

Volume 5: 1872 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 122

Oak Ridge, Va.; desires to abandon coarse farming of Virginia and return to Charleston, S.C.; weather data.

Folder 123

Volume 6: 1873 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 123

Oak Ridge, Va.

Folder 124

Volume 7: 1 January 1874-22 October 1874 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 124

Oak Ridge, Va.; death of Betty Beirne Miles in childbirth.

Folder 125

Volume 8: 1875 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 125

Oak Ridge, Va.

Folder 126

Volume 9: 1876 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 126

Oak Ridge, Va.

Folder 127

Volume 10: 1877 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 127

Oak Ridge, Va.; severe farm debts cause great anxiety.

Folder 128

Volume 11: 1878 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 128

Oak Ridge, Va.; farm debts and problems cause consideration of sending children to live with their grandfather in the mountains.

Folder 129

Volume 12: 1879 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 129

Oak Ridge, Va.

Folder 130

Volume 13: 1 January 1880-15 October 1880 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 130

Oak Ridge, Va. Decides to accept position of president of South Carolina College, Columbia, S.C.

Folder 131

Volume 14: 16 October 1880-3 January 1881 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 131

Columbia, S.C.; president of South Carolina College.

Folder 132

Volume 15: 1881 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 132

Columbia, S.C.; president of South Carolina College.

Folder 133

Volume 16: 1882 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 133

Columbia, S.C.; president of South Carolina College; decides to move to Ascension Parish, La., to manage Houmas Plantations (7) for father-in-law Oliver Beirne.

Folder 134

Volume 17: 1883 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 134

Houmas Plantations, Ascension Parish, La.

Folder 135

Volume 18: 1884 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 135

Houmas Plantation, Ascension Parish, La.; notes that rice and sugar cane farming is much improved over Virginia farming.

Folder 136

Volume 19: 1885 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 136

Houmas Plantation, Ascension Parish, La.

Folder 137

Volume 20: 1886 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 137

Houmas Plantation, Ascension Parish, La.

Folder 138

Volume 21: 1887 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 138

Houmas Plantation, Ascension Parish, La.

Folder 139

Volume 22: 1888 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 139

Houmas Plantation, Ascension Parish, La.

Folder 140

Volume 23: 1889 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 140

Houmas Plantation, Ascension Parish, La.; issues of sugar planters becoming serious.

Folder 141

Volume 24: 1890 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 141

Houmas Plantation, Ascension Parish, La.

Folder 142

Volume 25: 1891 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 142

Houmas Plantation, Ascension Parish, La.

Folder 143

Volume 26: 1892 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 143

Houmas Plantation, Ascension Parish, La.

Folder 144

Volume 27: 1893 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 144

Houmas Plantation, Ascension Parish, La.; much issue over levees in Delta region, including Ascension Parish area.

Folder 145

Volume 28: 1894 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 145

Houmas Plantation, Ascension Parish, La.

Folder 146

Volume 29: 1895 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 146

Houmas Plantation, Ascension Parish, La.; resignation as president of Ascension Parish delegation to the Louisiana Democratic Convention.

Folder 147

Volume 30: 1896 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 147

Houmas Plantation, Ascension Parish, La.

Folder 148

Volume 31: 1 January 1897-23 September 1897 #00508, Series: "Papers, 1784-1906." Folder 148

Houmas Plantation, Ascension Parish, La.; blindness caused by cataracts.

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