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Collection Number: 01020

Collection Title: Milligan Family Papers, 1771-1885.

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the FAQ section for more information.


This collection was rehoused under the sponsorship of a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Office of Preservation, Washington, D.C., 1990-1992.

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Size 1.5 feet of linear shelf space (approximately 475 items)
Abstract Milligan family members included Joseph Milligan (b. 1800) of Hamburg, S.C., and Augusta, Ga., physician, druggist, natural scientist, and cotton speculator; his son, Joseph A. S. Milligan (b. circa 1823), physician at Milton, S.C., and in Georgia, who also ran a small school at Augusta, Ga.; and Joseph A. S. Milligan's wife, Octavia Camfield, who was sister to Joseph Milligan's second wife, Elizabeth Camfield, and various Camfield relatives, including four more sisters and a brother, William A. Camfield. The Camfield family lived at Augusta, Ga. Most of the correspondence was written in the 1830s and 1840s, and was concerned with personal and family affairs and with Joseph Milligan's scientific and medical interests; also with cotton and business prospects. Included are letters from Samuel Henry Dickson and other Charleston doctors, scientists, and professors; correspondence between the Dr. Milligan, father and son; and letters from the women of the family about their daily activities. The personal letters of this group cover a wide range of topics, including current events and philosophic matters. The volumes are mostly records of physicians. Among the correspondents are members of the Camfield, Longstreet, and Milligan families, E. R. Calhoun, I.R. Branham, Henry M. Bruns, John Dickson, Samuel Henry Dickson, Charles T. Ketchum, M. Laborde, Thomas L. McBryde, George Parrott, and Henry K. Silliman.
Creator Milligan family.
Language English
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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Information For Users

Restrictions to Access
No restrictions. Open for research.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the Milligan Family Papers #1020, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Alternate Form of Material
All or part of this collection is available on microfilm from University Publications of America as part of Southern women and their families in the 19th century, Series A.
Acquisitions Information
Received from Henry Graves and Mrs. John B. Reeves of Mount Pleasant Plantation, Social Circle, Ga.
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subject Headings

The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Biographical Information

Joseph Milligan (fl. 1800-1875), of Hamburg (now North Augusta), S.C., and Augusta, Ga., was a physician, druggist, natural scientist, and cotton speculator. His son, Joseph A. S. Milligan (fl. 1823-1871) also practiced medicine. The senior Milligan's first wife, Elizabeth, died in 1841. He married his second wife, Elizabeth Camfield (fl. 1838-1884), also of Augusta, Ga., in 1842. Joseph A. S. Milligan married his stepmother's sister, Octavia Camfield (fl. 1840-1865) around 1848. The Camfields were related to the Longstreet family.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Scope and Content

The correspondence and other loose papers (bulk 1835-1849) are chiefly concerned with personal and family affairs. Joseph Milligan wrote to Joseph A. S. Milligan about the latter's education, personal and financial well-being, and future prospects as a physician. Many of these letters are prescriptive in tone. The women of the family corresponded regularly with other family members and female friends about domestic and social life--births, marriages, deaths, and illnesses; clothing; household duties; religion; and neighborhood news. In addition to letters dealing strictly with familial matters, there are also letters detailing Joseph Milligan's scientific interests and discussing the standard medical practices of the day; and business papers of the Milligan, Camfield, and Longstreet families.

The volumes are mostly records, 1838-1868, of the Milligans's medical practice. One volume also includes an undated temperance speech by Joseph Milligan, a series of D'Oyley needlework patterns (1852), a book of household accounts (1872), and an undated album of collected poems.

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Contents list

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 1. Correspondence and Other Loose Papers, 1790-1885 and undated.

About 470 items.

Personal correspondence of the Milligan, Longstreet, and Camfield families of Georgia and South Carolina. Most of the letters are concerned with personal and family affairs. However, there are many letters covering business affairs, education, medical practices, and religious views. There are relatively few comments on the Civil War or other political matters.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.1. Milligan Correspondence, 1793-1842.

About 120 items.

Joseph Milligan wrote to Joseph A. S. Milligan about the latter's education, personal and financial well-being, and future prospects as a physician. Many of these letters are prescriptive in tone. While attending the College of Charleston, the younger Milligan boarded with his father's sister, Jane Milligan (fl. 1835-1856). Jane often reported to the elder Milligan on his son's material and spiritual needs. There are also letters detailing Joseph Milligan's scientific interests and his seashell collection, discussions of standard medical practices of the day, and some business papers.

Folder 1-6

Folder 1

Folder 2

Folder 3

Folder 4

Folder 5

Folder 6

Milligan Correspondence #01020, Subseries: "1.1. Milligan Correspondence, 1793-1842." Folder 1-6

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.2. Longstreet-Camfield Correspondence, 1790-1842.

50 items.

Gilbert Longstreet and Abiel Camfield were partners in a mercantile business. In addition to papers related to their partnership, this subseries also includes deeds, indentures, and slave sales. There are also personal letters of the Longstreet and Camfield families.

Folder 7-8

Folder 7

Folder 8

Longstreet-Camfield Correspondence #01020, Subseries: "1.2. Longstreet-Camfield Correspondence, 1790-1842." Folder 7-8

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.3. Milligan-Camfield Correspondence, 1842-1885 and undated.

About 300 items.

This subseries begins with the marriage of Joseph Milligan and Elizabeth Camfield. Thus, it continues much of the correspondence begun in subseries 1.1 and 1.2. The bulk of the letters in this subseries were written by the women of the family who corresponded regularly with other family members and female friends about domestic and social life, clothing, household duties, religion, and neighborhood news.

Folder 9-18

Folder 9

Folder 10

Folder 11

Folder 12

Folder 13

Folder 14

Folder 15

Folder 16

Folder 17

Folder 18

Milligan-Camfield Correspondence #01020, Subseries: "1.3. Milligan-Camfield Correspondence, 1842-1885 and undated." Folder 9-18

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 2. Volumes, 1838-1872 and undated.

10 items.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.1. Joseph and Joseph A. S. Milligan, 1838-1868 and undated.

7 items.

Pocket record books of Drs. Joseph and Joseph A. S. Milligan with brief irregular entries recording accounts, formulae, prescriptions, physician's visiting lists, literary and historical notes, and an undated temperance speech.

Folder 19-25

Folder 19

Folder 20

Folder 21

Folder 22

Folder 23

Folder 24

Folder 25

Joseph and Joseph A. A. Milligan Materials #01020, Subseries: "2.1. Joseph and Joseph A. S. Milligan, 1838-1868 and undated." Folder 19-25

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.2. Other Volumes, 1852-1872 and undated.

3 items.

A household account book (1852), a booklet of "D'Oyley" needlework patterns (1852), and an undated album of collected poems.

Folder 26-28

Folder 26

Folder 27

Folder 28

Other Volumes #01020, Subseries: "2.2. Other Volumes, 1852-1872 and undated." Folder 26-28

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Processing Information

Processed by: Scott Philyaw, October 1991

Encoded by: ByteManagers Inc., 2008

An earlier inventory of this collection is included as an appendix to this inventory. This collection was rehoused under the sponsorship of a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Office of Preservation, Washington, D.C., 1990-1992.

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