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Collection Number: 01739

Collection Title: James W. Patton Papers (#1739) 1798-1923, 1999

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the section for more information.


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Size About 250 items (1.0 linear feet)
Abstract Papers of a 19th-century Asheville, N.C., family and their relatives in South Carolina and Maryland. The collection consists chiefly of personal correspondence, including antebellum letters received by Asheville merchant James W. Patton (1803-1861) and his wife, Henrietta Kerr Patton, mostly from Kerr relatives in Charleston, S.C., about family matters; letters of their son, Thomas Walton Patton (1841-1907), politician and mayor of Asheville, while he was a captain in the 60th North Carolina Regiment during the Civil War in Tennessee and Georgia, and while he was a volunteer officer in the Spanish-American War; and letters from Fannie Patton, a student at Saint Mary's School in Raleigh, N.C., 1862. There are also letters exchanged, 1798-1808, by James Calder (d. 1808), Maryland planter, and his son George Calder (1778-1809), United States Navy officer, relatives of Martha Turner Patton, wife of Thomas Walton Patton, concerning the Calders' Maryland plantation, naval affairs, yellow fever, and other matters. Also included are newspaper clippings of articles about members of the Patton, Turner, and Parker families; an account and notebook, 1892, of Thomas Walton Patton on a European trip; a memorial volume, 1918-1923, by the Asheville chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy; a photograph, ca. 1886, of the Phi Kappa Sigma Fraternity at the University of North Carolina, one of whose members was Haywood Parker, husband of Thomas Walton Patton's daughter Josie; and a videotape, Thomas Walton Patton: Asheville's Citizen and Soldier.
Creator Patton, James W., 1803-1861.
Language English.
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Restrictions to Access
No restrictions. Open for research.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Provenance
Received from the Haywood Parker family in 1950 and from Phyllis Lang of Asheville, N.C, in June 1999 (Acc. 98393).
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Biographical Information

James W. Patton (1803-1861), contractor and merchant of Asheville, N.C., was born in Wilkes County, N.C., to James, an Irish immigrant, and Anne Reynolds Patton of Wilkes County. The family moved to Buncombe County in about 1807, and James lived in and around Asheville for the remainder of his life.

Patton was active in development and government in the Asheville area. He proposed and helped complete an east-west thoroughfare in Asheville. He inherited the Eagle Hotel, one of the first hotels in Asheville, from his father. He later built a hotel in Warm Springs. Patton was a member of Asheville's first board of commissioners (1841) and served as the presiding justice in the Buncombe County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions for many years. Patton donated the land for Trinity Episcopal Church and helped open the church in 1841, serving on the first vestry.

Patton's first wife was Clara Walton of Burke County. With her, he had two sons, James Alfred and William Augustus, both of whom died of disease while serving in the Confederate Army. His second wife was Henrietta Kerr of Charleston, S.C. Their two children were Fannie Louisa and Thomas Walton Patton.

Thomas Walton Patton (1841-1907) served in the Buncombe Rifles and then with the 60th North Carolina Regiment during the Civil War. The 60th Regiment fought at Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, and Atlanta. Following the war, Patton returned to Asheville. He held numerous political offices in Asheville, including two terms as mayor, in 1893 and 1894. In 1898, Thomas Walton Patton enlisted as a private in the 1st North Carolina Volunteers to serve in the War of 1898. He was made adjutant and went with the battalion to Florida and Cuba.

Thomas Walton Patton married first, in 1863 or 1864, Anna B. Pearson of Alabama and second, in 1871, Martha Bell Turner (b. 1841). Thomas Walton Patton and Martha Turner Patton had two children, Josie B. and F. M. Patton. On 15 November 1899, Josie B. Patton married Haywood Parker, a lawyer who had graduated in 1887 from the University of North Carolina.

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Papers of a 19th-century Asheville, N.C., family and their relatives in South Carolina and Maryland. The collection consists chiefly of personal correspondence, including antebellum letters received by Asheville merchant James W. Patton (1803-1861) and his wife, Henrietta Kerr Patton, mostly from Kerr relatives in Charleston, S.C., about family matters; letters of their son, Thomas Walton Patton (1841-1907), politician and mayor of Asheville, while he was a captain in the 60th North Carolina Regiment during the Civil War in Tennessee and Georgia, and while he was a volunteer officer in the Spanish-American War; and letters from Fannie Patton, a student at Saint Mary's School in Raleigh, N.C., 1862. There are also letters exchanged, 1798-1808, by James Calder (d. 1808), Maryland planter, and his son George Calder (1778-1809), United States Navy officer, relatives of Martha Turner Patton, wife of Thomas Walton Patton, concerning the Calders' Maryland plantation, naval affairs, yellow fever, and other matters.

Also included are newspaper clippings of articles about members of the Patton, Turner, and Parker families; an account and notebook, 1892, of Thomas Walton Patton on a European trip; a memorial volume, 1918-1923, by the Asheville chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy; a photograph, ca. 1886, of the Phi Kappa Sigma Fraternity at the University of North Carolina, one of whose members was Haywood Parker, husband of Thomas Walton Patton's daughter Josie; and a videotape, Thomas Walton Patton: Asheville's Citizen and Soldier.

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Contents list

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Papers, 1798-1923, 1999, and undated.

About 250 items (1.0 linear ft.)

Arrangement: by type of document, then chronological.

Papers of a 19th-century Asheville, N.C., family and their relatives in South Carolina and Maryland. The collection consists chiefly of personal correspondence, including antebellum letters received by Asheville merchant James W. Patton (1803-1861) and his wife, Henrietta Kerr Patton, mostly from Kerr relatives in Charleston, S.C., about family matters; letters of their son, Thomas Walton Patton (1841-1907), politician and mayor of Asheville, while he was a captain in the 60th North Carolina Regiment, C.S.A., in Tennessee and Georgia, and while he was a volunteer officer in the Spanish-American War; and letters from Fannie Patton, a student at Saint Mary's School in Raleigh, N.C., 1862.

Most of the letters, 1798-1808, were exchanged by James Calder (d. 1808), Maryland planter, and his son, George Calder (1778-1809), United States Navy officer, who were relatives of Martha Turner Patton, wife of Thomas Walton Patton. These letters concern the Calders' plantations. Letters from the son to his father tell of naval affairs, yellow fever, politics, and Saratoga Springs.

Also included are newspaper clippings of articles about the members of the Patton, Turner, and Parker families; an account and notebook, 1892, of Thomas Walton Patton on a European trip; a volume, 1918-1923, "In Memoriam," by the Asheville chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy; and an oversized photograph, ca. 1886, of the Phi Kappa Sigma Fraternity at the University of North Carolina, one of whose members was Haywood Parker; and a videotape, Thomas Walton Patton: Asheville's Citizen and Soldier.

OP-P-1739/1. Photograph of Phi Kappa Sigma Fraternity, University of North Carolina, ca. 1886. Eight members, including Haywood Parker. #01739, Series: "Papers, 1798-1923, 1999, and undated."

VT-1739/1. Videotape, 1999. Thomas Walton Patton: Asheville's Citizen and Soldier (VHS, length 26:46), produced by Phyllis Lang and Chanse Simpson. #01739, Series: "Papers, 1798-1923, 1999, and undated."

Folder 1

1798-1808. Chiefly letters of James Calder and George Calder. #01739, Series: "Papers, 1798-1923, 1999, and undated." Folder 1

Folder 2

1826-1849. Chiefly letters between George Kerr and his niece, Elizabeth Patton. George Kerr wrote from Charleston, S.C.; New York City; and several watering places in the Carolinas. His letters frequently mention the Waltons of Morganton, especially Elizabeth Walton Avery. #01739, Series: "Papers, 1798-1923, 1999, and undated." Folder 2

Folder 3

1850-1856. Letters from members of the Kerr family in Charleston and Henrietta Kerr Patton in Asheville about family and neighborhood news, especially news of health. One long and detailed letter from Charleston describes the funeral of John C. Calhoun. #01739, Series: "Papers, 1798-1923, 1999, and undated." Folder 3

Folder 4

1860-1862. Correspondence of the James W. Patton family with relatives in Charleston and with a son, William Augustus Patton in Morristown, Tenn.; correspondence of Fannie Patton at Saint Mary's School in Raleigh, N.C., with family and friends; and letters from Thomas Walton Patton with the 60th North Carolina Regiment in Confederate Army camps in Tennessee to his mother and other family and friends during the Civil War. #01739, Series: "Papers, 1798-1923, 1999, and undated." Folder 4

Folder 5-6

Folder 5

Folder 6

1863. Letters from Thomas Walton Patton in Confederate Army camps in Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, and Georgia, mostly about camp life and about his attempts to resign his position as captain of Company C, 60th North Carolina Regiment, citing the death of his father and brother, his own poor health, and his provision of a substitute; letters to Fannie Patton from Charles H. Kerr in Charleston and from other friends and family; and scattered other letters. #01739, Series: "Papers, 1798-1923, 1999, and undated." Folder 5-6

Folder 7

1864-1866. Letters from Thomas Walton Patton to his wife and his mother from army camps in Georgia, letters to Henrietta Patton and Fannie Patton from Kerr family members, a few Turner family letters, and other letters. #01739, Series: "Papers, 1798-1923, 1999, and undated." Folder 7

Folder 8

1871-1895. Letters from scattered members of the family, including notes to Josie Patton; a letter, 28 November 1881, from Joseph Blount Cheshire to Sally T. Parker; letters, 1894, about genealogy from Marshall DeLancey Haywood to Haywood Parker, carbon copy of a typescript, "A Sketch of the Sixtieth N.C. Regiment Infantry." #01739, Series: "Papers, 1798-1923, 1999, and undated." Folder 8

Folder 9

1896-1909. A few papers about the Spanish-American War, including a letter from Josie Patton in Havana, Cuba, describing the countryside and social life in Havana; a few letters about the marriage of Josie Patton to Haywood Parker; condolence letters and memorials on the death of Thomas Walton Patton. #01739, Series: "Papers, 1798-1923, 1999, and undated." Folder 9

Folder 10-11

Folder 10

Folder 11

Undated. Civil War letters from Thomas Walton Patton; other undated letters and papers, including a typed speech apparently to students at the University of North Carolina; typed sketch of James W. Patton; manuscript copy of extracts from a book entitled The City of Baltimore, containing the history of the Turner family; a "History of the Turner family as far as I know it," including Calders and McLeods; sketches of the 60th North Carolina Regiment. #01739, Series: "Papers, 1798-1923, 1999, and undated." Folder 10-11

Folder 12-13

Folder 12

Folder 13

Clippings of newspapers articles, most from the Asheville Daily Citizen, about members of the Patton, Turner, and Parker families. #01739, Series: "Papers, 1798-1923, 1999, and undated." Folder 12-13

Folder 14

Account and notebook of Thomas Walton Patton, 1892, on a European trip. #01739, Series: "Papers, 1798-1923, 1999, and undated." Folder 14

Folder 15

"In Memoriam," Asheville Chapter, U.D.C., 1918-1923, sketches of and tributes to members who had died, including Fannie Patton, and newspaper clippings about Confederate veterans. #01739, Series: "Papers, 1798-1923, 1999, and undated." Folder 15

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Items separated include an oversized picture (OP-P-1739) and a videotape (VT-1739).

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