unc logo

Collection Number: 00616

Collection Title: Quitman Family Papers, 1784-1978

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the FAQ section for more information.


This collection was processed with support from the Randleigh Foundation Trust.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Collection Overview

Size 21.0 feet of linear shelf space (approximately 6000 items)
Abstract Prominent family members of the Quitman family of Monmouth Plantation near Natchez, Miss., included John A. Quitman (1799-1858), lawyer, planter, state legislator, governor, congressman, and United States Army officer; his wife, Eliza (Turner) Quitman (1810-1859); their daughter, Louisa (Quitman) Lovell Chadbourne (1826-1884); their daughter, T. Antonia (Quitman) Lovell (fl. 1820s-1900); Antonia's husband, William Storrow Lovell (1829-1900); Antonia's son, John Quitman Lovell (b. 1859); and Antonia's daughter, Rose Duncan Lovell (b. 1866). Henry Turner was Eliza Quitman brother. The collection includes correspondence, financial and legal papers, writings, volumes, and pictures of the Quitman and Lovell families. John A. Quitman's political and military activities are documented, including his participation in the state legislature, his expedition to Texas to fight in its struggle with Mexico, and his service in the Mexican War. Also documented are plantation affairs and accounts with commission merchants in New Orleans for cotton grown at Monmouth and Palmyra plantations. Included is documentation of a dispute, 1841-1843, between Henry Turner and a slave trader, Rice C. Ballard over money owed by Turner to Ballard and slaves purchased in 1836 by Turner that he claimed were in poor health and older than the trader had led him to believe. There are also materials realting to the murder of a slave in 1844. Much of the correspondence deals with family, and personal matters and there are frequent letters from the Quitmans' relatives in Rhinebeck, N.Y., and Philadelphia, Pa., and from Eliza's mother and brothers. There are a few Civil War letters that describe military life and the effects of the war on Natchez. After the war, most of the correspondence is between Antonia Quitman Lovell and her children, particularly John. Several of the Lovell boys attended college at the University of the South at Sewanee, Tenn. Between 1889 and 1916, most of the correspondence is directed to Rose Duncan Lovell and concerns family matters, social events, travel, and illnesses. Volumes include plantation records with slave lists, childhood diaries, and account books. Pictures are chiefly photographs of Quitman family members and their homes.
Creator Quitman family.
Language English
Back to Top

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Information For Users

Restrictions to Access
No restrictions. Open for research.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the Quitman Family Papers #616, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Alternate Form of Material
All or part of this collection is available on microfilm from University Publications of America as part of the Records of ante-bellum southern plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War, Series J.
Acquisitions Information
Received from Rose Lovell before 1940 and from William S. Lovell of Birmingham, Ala., in November 1941.
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
Back to Top

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subject Headings

The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

Back to Top

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Related Collections

Back to Top

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Biographical Information

John Anthony Quitman (1799-1858) was the son of the Reverend Frederick Henry Quitman (fl. 1790s) and Anna Elizabeth Hueck Quitman (fl. 1790s) of Rhinebeck, N.Y. He studied law in Chillicothe and Delaware, Ohio, and was admitted to the bar in 1821. At the end of the same year, he settled in Natchez, Miss., and began to practice law.

In 1824, Quitman married Eliza Turner, daughter of Henry (d. 1821) and Sarah Turner (d. 1853), later Sarah Fyler, who were well to do citizens of Natchez. John and Eliza eventually settled at Monmouth Plantation near Natchez and had several children who are listed on the family chart on the following page. Eliza frequently remained at Monmouth with the children while John travelled, attending to his business, political, and military activities.

Quitman was elected to the lower house of the state legislature in 1827 and served until 1835. During that period, he also held the position of chancellor and was chairman of the judiciary committee of the constitutional convention of 1832. In 1835, he was elected to the state Senate, became its president on 3 December, and until 7 January 1836, was acting governor. Quitman was elected governor of Mississippi in 1849, and served until 1850 when he resigned after being indicted by a federal grand jury at New Orleans for violation of neutrality laws. This was the result of Quitman's support for the independence movement in Cuba. The case against him was eventually dismissed, and he was elected to Congress in 1855, where he served until his death in 1858.

Quitman was also active in the Masons, serving as Grand Master of the Mississippi Masons from 1826 to 1838 and in 1840 and 1845. He is also known for his military activities. In 1836, he led a company called the "Fencibles" to Texas to take part in the struggle with Mexico. Upon his return he was appointed brigadier general of the Mississippi militia. He took part in the Mexican War and, in 1847, was promoted to major general.

Louisa T. Quitman (1826-1884), eldest daughter of John and Eliza, married John Sanborne Chadbourne (d. 1853) in 1852 and, after his death, married Joseph Lovell (1824-1869). She had at least three children. The second daughter, T. Antonia Quitman (fl. 1820s-1900), married William Storrow Lovell (fl. 1858-1900) in 1858 and had several children including Rose Duncan Lovell (b. 1866), and John Quitman Lovell (b. 1859), who was in the U.S. Navy. Antonia and William Lovell apparently spent most of their time in Sewanee, Tenn., while Louisa remained at Monmouth. However, family members visited and lived in both places and elsewhere in the country.

Other prominent figures in this collection include Eliza Quitman's brothers, Fielding (d. 1841) and Henry Turner (fl. 1830s-1840s), who were planters in Louisiana until Fielding's death. Henry later apparently managed one of John Quitman's properties. Also important is Louisa Quitman (fl. 1820s-1850s), sister of John A. Quitman, who corresponded with him from Philadelphia, Pa.

(Parts of this note were adapted from the entry on John A. Quitman by Charles Sumner Lobingier in the Dictionary of American Biography, Volume 15, pp. 315 316.)

Back to Top

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Scope and Content

This collection is divided into five series: Correspondence and Financial and Legal Materials; Other Papers; Volumes; Rose Duncan Lovell Papers; and Pictures.

In the Correspondence and Finanacial and Legal Materials series, the items before the Civil War consist chiefly of correspondence between John Quitman and Eliza Quitman, and their children and relatives. The correspondence between John and Eliza document his political and military activities as well as personal and family matters. There are letters to Eliza from John while he was away attending sessions of the state legislature, when he led the "Fencibles" to Texas to assist in the fight against Mexico, and when he fought in the Mexican War. Also documented are plantation operations and accounts with commission merchants for Quitman's plantations Monmouth, near Natchez, Miss., and Palmyra, in Warren County, Miss.

After the Civil War, most of the correspondence is between T. Antonia Quitman Lovell and her children.

The Volumes series contains items that relate to many different members of the Quitman and Lovell families. There are several volumes containing sermons by Frederick H. Quitman, father of John Quitman. Also included are journals, memoranda, and account books of John Quitman and several journals kept by Annie Rosalie Quitman. Later volumes include notebooks, journals, account books, and records of letters sent and received kept by T. Antonina Quitman Lovell and her daughters Antonia Quitman Lovell and Rose Duncan Lovell.

The Rose Duncan Lovell Papers series contains the personal correspondence of Rose Duncan Lovell between 1866 and 1938.

The Pictures series chiefly consists of pictures of John A. Quitman and of Monmouth Plantation.

Back to Top

Contents list

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series Quick Links

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 1. Correspondence and Financial and Legal Materials, 1784-1940 and undated.

About 3300 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Correspondence, financial, legal, and miscellaneous items of John A. Quitman, Eliza Turner Quitman, and their children and relatives.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.1. 1784-1859.

About 1600 items.

Chiefly correspondence of John A. Quitman and his wife Eliza Turner Quitman. Also included is correspondence with John's family in Rhinebeck, New York and later in Philadelphia, Pa.

Many of the earlier papers are deeds and indentures for land, and legal papers from the estate of Henry Turner, father of Eliza Turner Quitman. There are scattered letters to Eliza and John before they were married, including a letter of recommendation for John A. Quitman, teacher in an academy at Hartwick, dated 1 August 1818. In 1824, John wrote several love letters to Eliza prior to their marriage on 24 December 1824.

Much of the correspondence between 1828 and 1836 is from John to Eliza when he was away attending court or meetings of the state legislature and other political meetings. In January and February of 1828, Quitman wrote to Eliza from Jackson, Mississippi, where he was attending the session of the lower house of the state legislature. He wrote about his health and other personal matters and occasionally described the activities of the legislature. In April, he wrote to Eliza from Port Gibson where he was attending court.

Quitman served as chancellor of Mississippi from 1827 to 1835 and was chairman of the judiciary committee of the constitutional convention of 1832. In 1835, he was elected to the state senate, became its president, and was acting governor from 3 December 1835 to 7 January 1836. He continued to write to Eliza from Clinton, Mississippi, describing his political activities and personal matters such as his health, the health of his family, visits to Eliza's family, and instructions for the servants. From August to October 1832, there are eight letters to Eliza describing the constitutional convention.

In addition to letters between Quitman and Eliza, from 1824 through 1836 there is correspondence of John A. Quitman with members of his family in Rhinebeck, N.Y., including his father the Reverend Frederick H. Quitman, his brothers Henry and Albert, and his sister Louisa. Eliza corresponded with her mother Sarah Baker Turner (later Mrs. Fyler) and her brother Henry in Philadelphia. In May 1830, Henry Clay wrote to Quitman thanking him for his help in obtaining some magnolias. A few financial accounts are included, one of which is a list of slaves purchased from Ballard, Franklin & Company.

In 1836, Quitman led a company called the "Fencibles" to aid the Texans in their struggle with Mexico. From April to July 1836, Quitman wrote to Eliza about the expedition. Most of the fighting was apparently over by the time he arrived.

Between 1837 and 1843, the correspondents are chiefly John A. Quitman at Jackson, Miss.; his wife Eliza at Monmouth, their plantation near Natchez; their daughter Louisa, who chiefly wrote to Quitman; Mrs. Quitman's brothers Henry and Fielding L. Turner; and Quitman's brother Henry and sister Louisa. Mrs. Quitman also had other relatives in the area who wrote to her periodically.

In 1837 and 1838, there are many financial accounts relating to plantation affairs, lists of slaves, and accounts with cotton factors kept by Fielding Turner and his brother Henry for their plantation (possibly called Dulac) in Terrebone Parish, La.

In 1839, Quitman traveled to London, England, and wrote to his family describing his activities and the sights.

After his return from England, John Quitman was apparently less involved in politics and concentrated more on the practice of law. Sometime in 1840 or 1841, Quitman was appointed judge. There are numerous protests, bills of sale for land, and other legal documents included. Quitman wrote to his wife from Jackson, Mississippi, while he was attending sessions of the circuit court. Quitman's daughter Louisa wrote to him about social events she attended. Scattered throughout this time period is correspondence with Quitman's law partner John T. McMurran and references to members of his family.

Fielding Turner died in 1841, and his remains were sent to the Quitman family. About this time, a legal battle began between Henry Turner and a slave trader, Rice C. Ballard. The dispute was apparently over money owed by Turner to Ballard, and slaves purchased in 1836 by Turner that he claimed were in poor health and older than the trader had led him to believe. The dispute was apparently settled in October 1843, after nearly a year of negotiation and court proceedings.

Also included are business letters to Quitman on cotton sales from A & J Dennistoun & Co., commission merchants of New Orleans. Letters of September through November 1842 concern the loss of the steamboat Vicksburg, the recovery of bales of cotton from the river, and insurance claims made by Quitman.

From 1844 to 1847, the correspondence is chiefly between John Quitman, his wife Eliza, and their daughter Louisa. Eliza wrote to John while he was in Jackson about children, relatives, happenings in Natchez, and the managment of plantation affairs. There are also some letters from Quitman's sister Louisa in New York and some reports from A & J Dennistoun & Co., commission merchants, about sales of cotton for one of Quitman's plantations, Palmyra, owned in partnership with Henry Turner, who corresponded with Quitman over management of Palmyra, the sale of property owned by Quitman, and the murder of a slave on the plantation in October 1844. Letters of November and December 1844 include two from Albert J. Quitman to his brother John concerning the operation of Live Oaks, a sugar plantation near Houma, La. Another brother, Henry S. Quitman and his wife, described life and farming in Baltimore County, Md., in letters of 1845 and later. By December 1845, Albert had died and was buried at Grand Cailou, La. John Quitman managed Live Oaks in 1846.

Letters from Eliza to John in early 1846 discuss her feelings regarding an impending election and his plans to enter public life, although he lost the election. Letters of this period reveal a considerable strain in their relationship and the deaths of two of their seven daughters. However, in the summer of 1846, the whole family travelled east, where John joined the U.S. Army and the rest of the family went on vacation. Between August 1846 and November 1847, Quitman served as a brigadier general of volunteers in the United States Army during the Mexican War. He wrote to Eliza and Louisa describing his activities and the progress of the army. They also wrote to him concerning affairs in Mississippi and family matters. Letters mention comings and goings of Jefferson Davis and a dispute between Quitman and Davis over rank.

Early in 1848, Quitman was in Washington, D.C. Eliza joined him there in January and February, and most of the correspondence is directed to her from the children who remained at home, describing their social activities. By April 1848, both the Quitmans had returned to Mississippi. During the rest of 1848 and 1849, most of the correspondence is directed to John Quitman, and much of it has to do with one of his plantations, Palmyra, which continued to be run by Henry Turner, brother of Eliza Quitman. Included are statements of cotton sales through A & J Dennistoun & Co., and letters on the management of the plantation from Henry, including several accounts of a cholera epidemic among the slaves. Tax receipts for the partnership in 1849 show 290 slaves and several thousand acres of land in Warren County, Miss.

The Quitman's sent their son Henry to college at Nassau Hall in 1849, and, from there, he wrote accounts of his activities. In 1850, Quitman was elected governor of Mississippi and served until 1851 when he resigned as a result of his indictment by a federal grand jury at New Orleans for violating neutrality laws. He was believed to have supported Lopez, a leader of the independence movement in Cuba. Most of the correspondence during 1850 and 1851 is personal, from family members who remained on the plantation near Natchez, and from his sister Louisa. Occasionally, Quitman mentioned political matters. He wrote to Eliza about his inauguration as governor in January 1850. In October 1850, Quitman wrote to his daughter Louisa about his feelings on the Compromise of 1850. Quitman's sister Louisa wrote to him about his indictment for his supposed support of Lopez in Cuba.

In 1851 and 1852, there is correspondence of Louisa Quitman and the Reverend John S. Chadbourne, Episcopal minister of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, whom she married on 2 December 1852. In the fall of 1853, in an epidemic of yellow fever, Mr. Chadbourne, Sarah Turner Fyler (Eliza Quitman's mother) and Fielding Turner (Eliza Quitman's nephew), son of Henry Turner, died.

In 1854, there are some telegrams and legal documents relating to the case against General Quitman involving Cuba. Quitman also apparently changed the commission merchant he used in New Orleans to Ro. W. Estlin Co. and received correspondence from them about the cotton he sold.

In the fall of 1854, Louisa Quitman Chadbourne wrote to her family from Franklin (Louisiana?) where she was visiting with her daughter Eva. Among other topics, she mentioned her sorrow over her husband's death. In December 1857 and January 1858, there are letters from Louisa and Antonia ("Tonia"), who were visiting their father in Washington, D.C., and enjoying the social life there.

Among General Quitman's correspondents in 1857 and 1858 were William Alexander Richardson, who wrote to Quitman on 16 February 1857 about a conversation he had with John Slidell during the Democratic convention in Cincinnati in 1856 relating to the choice of a vice presidential candidate and the possibility that Quitman might be chosen. Also included is a copy of a letter dated 9 February 1858 from Captain P.G.T. Beauregard to John Slidell (United States senator from Louisiana) about the troops going to Utah and the strategy to be followed.

On 29 June 1858, Antonia Quitman married Capt. William Storrow Lovell, son of Joseph Lovell (1788-1836) and Margaret Eliza Mansfield Lovell. In January 1859, Louisa Quitman Chadbourne married Joseph Lovell, brother of William S. Lovell.

General Quitman died in July 1858. There are messages of condolence written to Eliza Quitman and resolutions passed by various organizations on the occasion of his death. There are also papers relating to the settlement of the Quitman estate. After 1858, until the death of Eliza Quitman in 1859, the papers consist of correspondence between Eliza and her children Louisa, Antonia, Henry, Rosalie, Eliza, and Frederica, and of correspondence among the daughters.

Folder 1

1784-1824 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 1

Folder 2

1825 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 2

Folder 3

1826-1827 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 3

Folder 4

1828 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 4

Folder 5

1829-1831 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 5

Folder 6

1832 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 6

Folder 7

1833 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 7

Folder 8

1834 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 8

Folder 9

1835 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 9

Folder 10-12

Folder 10

Folder 11

Folder 12

1836 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 10-12

Folder 13-14

Folder 13

Folder 14

1837 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 13-14

Folder 15

1838 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 15

Folder 16-17

Folder 16

Folder 17

1839 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 16-17

Folder 18-19

Folder 18

Folder 19

1840 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 18-19

Folder 20-22

Folder 20

Folder 21

Folder 22

1841 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 20-22

Folder 23-29

Folder 23

Folder 24

Folder 25

Folder 26

Folder 27

Folder 28

Folder 29

1842 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 23-29

Folder 30-34

Folder 30

Folder 31

Folder 32

Folder 33

Folder 34

1843 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 30-34

Folder 35-38

Folder 35

Folder 36

Folder 37

Folder 38

1844 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 35-38

Folder 39-42

Folder 39

Folder 40

Folder 41

Folder 42

1845 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 39-42

Folder 43-47

Folder 43

Folder 44

Folder 45

Folder 46

Folder 47

1846 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 43-47

Folder 48-54

Folder 48

Folder 49

Folder 50

Folder 51

Folder 52

Folder 53

Folder 54

1847 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 48-54

Folder 55-58

Folder 55

Folder 56

Folder 57

Folder 58

1848 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 55-58

Folder 59-61

Folder 59

Folder 60

Folder 61

1849 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 59-61

Folder 62-66

Folder 62

Folder 63

Folder 64

Folder 65

Folder 66

1850 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 62-66

Folder 67-69

Folder 67

Folder 68

Folder 69

1851 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 67-69

Folder 70-75

Folder 70

Folder 71

Folder 72

Folder 73

Folder 74

Folder 75

1852 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 70-75

Folder 76-81

Folder 76

Folder 77

Folder 78

Folder 79

Folder 80

Folder 81

1853 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 76-81

Folder 82-84

Folder 82

Folder 83

Folder 84

1854 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 82-84

Folder 85-86

Folder 85

Folder 86

1855 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 85-86

Folder 87-89

Folder 87

Folder 88

Folder 89

1856 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 87-89

Folder 90-92

Folder 90

Folder 91

Folder 92

1857 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 90-92

Folder 93-99

Folder 93

Folder 94

Folder 95

Folder 96

Folder 97

Folder 98

Folder 99

1858 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 93-99

Folder 100-102

Folder 100

Folder 101

Folder 102

1859 #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 100-102

Folder 102a-d

Undated #00616, Subseries: "1.1. 1784-1859." Folder 102a-d

Back to Top

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.2. 1860-1940.

About 1700 items.

Early items in this subseries comprise Civil War material and include descriptions of Confederate camp life and discussions about the effect of the war on the plantation in Natchez. Also included are orders and receipts.

Among the Civil War letters is the correspondence of Annie Rosalie Quitman, daughter of John and Eliza, with Major William Patterson Duncan, whom she married in June 1861. Also included are the letters of Louisa T. Lovell and her husband Colonel Joseph Lovell while he was at Camp Clark in Corinth, Miss.; Union City, Tenn.; and Richmond and Manassas, Va. There are several letters from General Mansfield Lovell, brother of Joseph and William S. Lovell, and letters dated 8 April, 11 April, 1 May, and 19 August 1862, from Confederate States of America General Johnson Kell Duncan, husband of Mary Grimshaw. In December 1862, there are obituary notices for General Duncan.

In November 1863, there is a mention of the birth of Alice Quitman Lovell, daughter of Louisa and Joseph Lovell, and the marriage of Frederica ("Freddie") Quitman. In a letter dated 7 February 1864, Louisa commented on the behavior of the servants and the disappearance of many of them.

Also included in the Civil War period is a surveyor's plan of the township of Palmyra, Miss., dated 31 January 1861. The copy was certified by the secretary of state at Jackson, Miss.

In 1871, there is mention of the birth of Joseph Lovell. In 1873, John and William S. ("Tod") Lovell began writing to their parents from the University of the South where they were going to school. Also included are commencement programs of Sewanee in 1877 and 1879.

In 1888, there are papers relating to the death of William P. Duncan, son of Rosalie Q. Duncan. In 1891, the Reverend William T. Manning, who was later Episcopal Bishop of New York, wrote several letters to Antonia Lovell and her son Joseph M. Lovell. Among other topics, he compared the professors at Sewanee to those at the General Theological Seminary he was attending in New York.

Many of the letters between 1888 and 1893 consist of correspondence between Antonia Lovell and her children. In 1891, there was correspondence about the wedding of Anne (Nan) Campbell Gordon of Baltimore, Md., and John Q. Lovell (United States Navy), and, in 1892, of Kell Duncan (daughter of Mrs. Johnson K. Duncan) and Dr. Frederick W. Parham.

The family letters continued in the 1890s. In 1895, there is mention of the marriage of Florence van Antwerp and the Reverend William T. Manning in Cincinnati. Also included is a letter dated 7 March 1896 from Joseph Jefferson, a famous actor, to Rosalie Duncan declining an invitation. In 1896, there are letters pertaining to the marriage of William Haskell DuBose and Dean Spencer of St. Louis. In 1897, many of the letters are concerned with a flood at Palmyra and also with the death of Joseph Mansfield Lovell, physician and son of Antonia and Col. William S. Lovell. There is also mention of the deaths of "Annie" in 1898 and of William Storrow Lovell, Sr., in January 1900. Also included are letters from William T. Manning dated 14 January 1898 and 4 May 1898.

After 1900, most of the papers consist of letters to Antonia Lovell from her sons William ("Tod") and John and her daughter in law Caroline. Also included are letters from William T. Manning dated 31 August 1901, 19 September 1905, 26 December 1905, and 13 November 1914. In 1914, some letters refer to the death of Annie Rosalie Quitman Duncan. Included for the year 1930 is a service record dated 24 July for Lieutenant Commander John Quitman Lovell, Supply Corps, United States Navy.

Folder 103

1860 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 103

Folder 104

Folder number 104 not used #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 104

Folder 105-108

Folder 105

Folder 106

Folder 107

Folder 108

1861 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 105-108

Oversize Paper OP-616/1

Surveyor's plan of Palmyra, Miss., 1861 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." OP-616/1

Folder 109-110

Folder 109

Folder 110

1862 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 109-110

Folder 111

1863 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 111

Folder 112-113

Folder 112

Folder 113

1864 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 112-113

Folder 114

1865 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 114

Folder 115

1866 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 115

Folder 116

1867-1869 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 116

Folder 117

1870-1871 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 117

Folder 118

1872 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 118

Folder 119-120

Folder 119

Folder 120

1873 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 119-120

Folder 121

1874 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 121

Folder 122-123

Folder 122

Folder 123

1875 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 122-123

Folder 124-125

Folder 124

Folder 125

1876 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 124-125

Folder 126

1877 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 126

Folder 127

1878 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 127

Folder 128

1879 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 128

Folder 129-131

Folder 129

Folder 130

Folder 131

1880 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 129-131

Folder 132-133

Folder 132

Folder 133

1881 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 132-133

Folder 134

1882 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 134

Folder 135-136

Folder 135

Folder 136

1883 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 135-136

Folder 137

1884 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 137

Folder 138

1885 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 138

Folder 139

1886 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 139

Folder 140-141

Folder 140

Folder 141

1887 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 140-141

Folder 142-143

Folder 142

Folder 143

1888 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 142-143

Folder 144-145

Folder 144

Folder 145

1889 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 144-145

Folder 146

1890 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 146

Folder 147-150

Folder 147

Folder 148

Folder 149

Folder 150

1891 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 147-150

Folder 151-156

Folder 151

Folder 152

Folder 153

Folder 154

Folder 155

Folder 156

1892 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 151-156

Folder 157-162

Folder 157

Folder 158

Folder 159

Folder 160

Folder 161

Folder 162

1893 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 157-162

Folder 163-166

Folder 163

Folder 164

Folder 165

Folder 166

1894 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 163-166

Folder 167-170

Folder 167

Folder 168

Folder 169

Folder 170

1895 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 167-170

Folder 171

1896 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 171

Folder 172-176

Folder 172

Folder 173

Folder 174

Folder 175

Folder 176

1897 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 172-176

Folder 177-178

Folder 177

Folder 178

1898 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 177-178

Folder 179

1899 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 179

Folder 180-181

Folder 180

Folder 181

1900 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 180-181

Folder 182

1901-1902 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 182

Folder 183-184

Folder 183

Folder 184

1903 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 183-184

Folder 185

1904 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 185

Folder 186

1905 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 186

Folder 187

1906-1907 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 187

Folder 188

1908 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 188

Folder 189

1909 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 189

Folder 190

1910 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 190

Folder 191

1911 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 191

Folder 192

1912 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 192

Folder 193

1913 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 193

Folder 194

1914-1915 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 194

Folder 195

1916-1940 #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 195

Folder 196-214

Folder 196

Folder 197

Folder 198

Folder 199

Folder 200

Folder 201

Folder 202

Folder 203

Folder 204

Folder 205

Folder 206

Folder 207

Folder 208

Folder 209

Folder 210

Folder 211

Folder 212

Folder 213

Folder 214

Undated #00616, Subseries: "1.2. 1860-1940." Folder 196-214

Back to Top

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 2. Other Papers, 1832-1978 and undated.

About 170 items.

Arrangement: by type.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.1. Writings and Clippings, 1849-1938 and undated.

About 100 items.

Original writings by members of the Quitman family, and newspaper clippings, chiefly about John A. Quitman. There are several drafts of speeches written by John A. Quitman, including a speech on the constitutional rights of the South, and one on the Bank of the United States.

Folder 215-216

Folder 215

Folder 216

Writings #00616, Subseries: "2.1. Writings and Clippings, 1849-1938 and undated." Folder 215-216

Folder 217-219

Folder 217

Folder 218

Folder 219

Clippings #00616, Subseries: "2.1. Writings and Clippings, 1849-1938 and undated." Folder 217-219

Back to Top

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.2. Miscellaneous, 1847-1978 and undated.

Back to Top

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 3. Volumes, 1804-1913 and undated.

65 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.1. 1804-1858.

18 items.

This subseries contains four volumes that belonged to Frederick H. Quitman, father of John A. Quitman; six volumes that belonged to John A. Quitman; four journals kept by Annie Rosalie Quitman; and four miscellaneous volumes.

Folder 226

Volume 1, 14 April 1804 #00616, Subseries: "3.1. 1804-1858." Folder 226

Sermon entitled "On Spiritual Music," by Frederick H. Quitman of Rhinebech, N.Y.

Folder 227

Volume 2, undated #00616, Subseries: "3.1. 1804-1858." Folder 227

Undated, eleven-page pamphlet entitled "The Late Conflagration at Richmond, a Warning to the Good People of the United States of American in a Letter to a Friend in New York," by Philalethes. It is believed to have belonged to Frederick H. Quitman.

Folder 228

Volume 3, undated #00616, Subseries: "3.1. 1804-1858." Folder 228

Undated volume entitled "Anecdotes and Biographical Sketches for Improvement in Religion and Morality," by Frederick H. Quitman.

Folder 229

Volume 4, undated #00616, Subseries: "3.1. 1804-1858." Folder 229

Appears to be an undated sermon by Frederick H. Quitman.

Folder 230a

Volume 5, 28 November 1819-12 July 1822 #00616, Subseries: "3.1. 1804-1858." Folder 230a

Journal kept by John A. Quitman when he was at Chillicothe, and later at Delaware, Ohio, studying law. He wrote about attending sessions at court and his progress in his studies. He also described his social life, visits from friends, dances and balls, productions by the Thespian Society, hunting, sleighing, and other activities.

Folder 230b

Volume 5-A, 21 October 1819-5 November 1821, May-June 1825, May 1831 #00616, Subseries: "3.1. 1804-1858." Folder 230b

Contains three fragments believed to be parts of a journal kept by John A. Quitman. The first consists of 38 disconnected pages, dated 21 October 1819 through 5 November 1821, twenty of which are small pages. These appear to be from a journal kept by Quitman on his way from Rhinebeck, New York, to Mississippi, via Ohio. The second journal fragment is dated May through June 1825 and consists of twelve disconnected pages from a journal of a trip from Natchez to Wheeling. The third journal fragment consists of four pages dated May 1831 and documents a trip from Natchez up the river.

Folder 231

Volume 6, 3 August-27 October 1827, 1830, 1829 #00616, Subseries: "3.1. 1804-1858." Folder 231

Contains private memoranda of John A. Quitman. Included are several pages of journal entries from 3 August to 27 October 1827. One entry consists of a description of Quitman's election to the lower house of the legislature and a chart of votes cast. Following the journal are several pages of notes on legislative bills and current political issues, dated 1830. In the back of the volume are paragraphs written in 1829 about Quitman and his friends, Abram G. Claypoole, John T. McMurran, and Dr. John Bell, predicting their future.

Folder 232

Volume 7, 1833-1839, 1842 #00616, Subseries: "3.1. 1804-1858." Folder 232

A memoranda book for Springfield Plantation kept by John Quitman between 1833 and 1849. Included are entries on the purchase of the plantation and lists of slaves and slave families at the plantation. In the middle of the volume are descriptions of fruits and vegetables grown at Monmouth Plantation dated 1842.

Folder 233

Volume 8, 1834-1841 #00616, Subseries: "3.1. 1804-1858." Folder 233

A bankbook kept by Quitman for his account at the Planters Bank.

Folder 234

Volume 9, 1845-1861 #00616, Subseries: "3.1. 1804-1858." Folder 234

An account book kept by Henry Turner at Palmyra in which he listed purchases of supplies. It was later used by Antonia Q. Lovell, who pasted in newspaper clippings of recipes.

Folder 235

Volume 10, circa 1848 #00616, Subseries: "3.1. 1804-1858." Folder 235

A book kept by William P. Duncan of Findley, Ohio, when he attended Washington College, Pa. It contains a copy of the valedictory address delivered by John H. Craig to the senior class of 1848.

Folder 236

Volume 11, 1850-1862 #00616, Subseries: "3.1. 1804-1858." Folder 236

An account book showing the management of property from the estate of Joseph Lovell of New York City, which was held for his children who were not of age.

Folder 237

Volume 12, 1852-1857 #00616, Subseries: "3.1. 1804-1858." Folder 237

An account book of General John A. Quitman with W.A. Britton & Co.

Folder 238-239

Folder 238

Folder 239

Volume 13, 1851; Volume 14, 17 January-27 October 1852 #00616, Subseries: "3.1. 1804-1858." Folder 238-239

Volume 13 and volume 14 are both journals kept by Annie Rosalie Quitman when she was a child. She describes her daily activities, visits from neighbors, and attending school. She also keeps a list which she called "Funny Wonders," which notes special events such as births and marriages.

Folder 240-241

Folder 240

Folder 241

Volume 15, 1856-1860, 1863, 1866, 1867, 1868, and 1872; Volume 16, 1855-1856 #00616, Subseries: "3.1. 1804-1858." Folder 240-241

Volume 15 and volume 16 are both journals kept by Annie Rosalie Quitman when she was a young woman. The journals contain long entries in which she describes in detail her activities during the day, the appearance and conversation of visitors, and her own thoughts and feelings. Among other activities, Rosalie describes the books she read, arranging the library, gardening, and drawing lessons. In December 1856, she went to visit her sister Mary at Live Oaks Plantation, which was probably south of Natchez in Louisiana. She writes about the trip on the boat and the social events at Live Oaks. In January 1859, she writes a description of her sister Louisa's wedding. Eliza Quitman died in 1859, and Rosalie writes in December about her mother's death. In 1863, she mentions the fall of Vicksburg. There is only one entry each year from 1863 through 1872.

Folder 242

Volume 17, circa 1858-1875 #00616, Subseries: "3.1. 1804-1858." Folder 242

A scrapbook containing newspaper clippings and some attractive engravings.

Back to Top

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.2. 1860-1919.

64 items.

Forty seven volumes dating from during or after the Civil War. Most of them belonged to Antonia Quitman Lovell or her daughters, Rose Duncan Lovell or Antonia Quitman Lovell.

Folder 243

Volume 18, 1864-1865 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 243

A Confederate housekeeping book, kept in Columbia, S.C., showing commodities purchased and their prices. The volume was originally used as an account book by W.S. Lovell.

Folder 244

Volume 19, undated #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 244

A cash account book that belonged to John Q. Lovell of Palmyra, Miss.

Folder 245

Volume 20, 1875-1876 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 245

Entitled "Jottings by the Wayside," this is a journal about life at Sewanee in 1875 and a European trip in 1876. The author is unknown, but believed to be a Quitman.

Folder 246

Volume 21, 14 June-5 November 1876 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 246

A travel journal kept by W.P. Duncan during a trip to Great Britain and Europe.

Folder 247

Volume 22, 1875-1901 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 247

A scrapbook containing clippings about books, authors, libraries, new publications, and literary criticism. Also included are handwritten lists of books and their prices.

Folder 248

Volume 23, 1878 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 248

A tiny diary kept by Rose Lovell when she was a child.

Folder 249

Volume 24, 1878-1884 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 249

An account book for groceries and household expenses. Possibly belonged to Antonia Quitman Lovell.

Folder 250

Volume 25, 1879-1883 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 250

A blank album containing loose clippings, pictures, and greeting cards that were never pasted in. They are mostly about the stage and opera. The inscription reads, "To Lampkin from Aunt Rose."

Folder 251

Volume 26, 1880 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 251

A "charts in literature" notebook kept by A.Q. Lovell (believed to be the elder Antonia Quitman Lovell) at Columbia Institute, Tenn.

Folder 252

Volume 27, 1883-1884, 1888 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 252

A journal kept by the younger Antonia Quitman Lovell at Sewanee, Tenn. There is a long entry every two or three months.

Folder 253

Volume 28, 1884 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 253

A book of handwritten and printed cooking recipes which belonged to Rosalie Quitman Duncan.

Folder 254

Volume 29, 1884 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 254

Contains Baker family records compiled by William C. Baker. They were copied in a notebook belonging to the elder Antonia Quitman Lovell.

Folder 255

Volume 30, 24 September-1 November 1884 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 255

Kept by Rose D. Lovell at Sewanee. It contains memories of the wedding of William Storrow Lovell and Caroline Couper and also a list of their presents.

Folder 256

Volume 31, 1885-1892 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 256

An account book of the elder Antonia Quitman Lovell in which she kept accounts of home and farm expenses, travel, labor, personal shopping, etc.

Folder 257

Volume 32, circa 1886 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 257

A notebook which contains "A Protest and Attempt to Vindicate My Country and My People from a Late Slander," following the recent publication of the life of William Gilmore Simms. The author is unknown.

Folder 258

Volume 33, 1886 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 258

A notebook kept by A.Q. Lovell (probably the elder Antonia) containing German poems, notes on language study, and miscellaneous notes.

Folder 259

Volume 34, 1887 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 259

A notebook on Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Edmund Keen that belonged to A.Q. Lovell (probably the elder Antonia).

Folder 260

Volume 35, 1887 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 260

A scrapbook, dating mostly from 1887, containing clippings, poems, articles on belles-lettres, Confederate matters, miscellaneous clippings, and pictures. It apparently belonged to Antonia Quitman Lovell.

Folder 261

Volume 36, 1887-1888 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 261

A record of letters received and addresses. It probably belonged to the younger Antonia Quitman Lovell.

Folder 262

Volume 37, 24 February-3 April 1888 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 262

A diary of household, family, and neighborhood matters at Monmouth near Natchez, Miss. It was probably written by one of the daughters of John and Eliza Quitman, possibly Louisa.

Folder 263

Volume 38, 1 June 1888-25 December 1890 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 263

A journal of the elder Antonia Quitman Lovell at Sewanee and at Monmouth.

Folder 264

Volume 39, 1889-1892 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 264

A journal with autobiographical notes kept by the younger Antonia Quitman Lovell.

Folder 265

Volume 40, 1890-1897 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 265

A record of the receipt of some kind of annual dues or subscriptions.

Folder 266

Volume 41, 1891-1897 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 266

Contains petty cash accounts kept by the elder Antonia Quitman Lovell.

Folder 267

Volume 42, 1892-1896 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 267

A cash book kept by the elder Antonia Quitman Lovell.

Folder 268

Volume 43, 1892, 1899, 1902 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 268

Stamped "R.Q. Duncan." The first half is a chemistry notebook. The second hand contains a journal in a different hand, covering the years 1892, 1899, and 1902.

Folder 269

Volume 44, 1894 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 269

A recipe book that belonged to Antonia Quitman Lovell Nauts.

Folder 270

Volume 45, 1895 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 270

A notebook on George Washington, Ulysses S. Grant, and others that possibly belonged to the elder Antonia Quitman Lovell.

Folder 271

Volume 46, 1896-1905 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 271

Contains memorabilia compiled by the elder Antonia Quitman. Included are notes and quotations from Ruskin, Coleridge, Nietzsche, popular songs, and theological and romantic authors. The volume had originally been used as a memorandum book by H. Turner in 1854.

Folder 272

Volume 47, 26 April 1897 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 272

Contains a manuscript by Mrs. Lovell entitled "The Story of Isaac: a Tale of Old Southern Days."

Folder 273

Volume 48, 1899 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 273

Contains notes on authors, belles-lettres, and dreams. The owner is not known.

Folder 274

Volume 49, 20 August-30 August 1899, 1906-1907 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 274

Contains the thoughts of Rosalie Duncan Lovell at Sewanee about the death of Joe two years before. Programs from Sewanee, 1906-1907, are enclosed.

Folder 275

Volume 50, December 1899-June 1907 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 275

Rose Duncan Lovell's tiny notebook containing a record of letters received at Sewanee, Monmouth, and in Europe. It also contains addresses.

Folder 276

Volume 51, 1900, 1903 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 276

Belonged to Mrs. R.Q. Duncan of Natchez. It contains notes of foreign travel, journal entries, and addresses of hotels in Europe.

Folder 277

Volume 52, 15 April-20 September 1903 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 277

A diary of a European trip, including Italy, Germany, and France, with pictures. It belonged to Eva C. Lovell.

Folder 278

Volume 53, February 1903 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 278

A diary with notes on a boat trip aboard the Molke.

Folder 279

Volume 54, 1903, 1904, 1906 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 279

The elder Antonia Quitman Lovell's account book on a European trip in 1903, at Sewanee in 1904, at Natchez in 1906, and elsewhere.

Folder 280

Volume 55, circa 1907 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 280

A tiny portfolio containing little packages of classified clippings and notes.

Folder 281

Volume 56, July 1907-April 1919 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 281

Rose Duncan Lovell's record of letters received, addresses, and birthdays.

Folder 282

Volume 57, May 1907-December 1910 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 282

Contains Rose Duncan Lovell's housekeeping accounts in New Orleans, Sewanee, Birmingham, Natchez, and on trips.

Folder 283

Volume 58, January 1911-July 1913 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 283

Contains Rose Duncan Lovell's housekeeping accounts at Monmouth and Sewanee.

Folder 284

Volume 59, undated #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 284

A typed copy of "Natchez Notes" by Caroline C. Lovell, containing thirteen sketches of life in the area. It is not known what happened to the original volume.

Folder 285

Volume 60, undated #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 285

Contains "What is Civilization?", an essay read before the Progressive Club at Natchez.

Folder 286

Volume 61, undated #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 286

Contains recipes for cooking and copies of poems.

Folder 287

Volume 62, undated #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 287

A notebook containing extracts from Matthew Arnold, loose poems, loose papers on Tennyson's life, Cowper's task, etc. The volume possibly belonged to Antonia Quitman Lovell.

Folder 288

Volume 63, 1854 #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 288

Contains pressed leaves gathered in Italy.

Folder 289

Volume 64, chiefly 1890s #00616, Subseries: "3.2. 1860-1919." Folder 289

Entitled "A Heterogeneous Collection of Scraps & Bits, also Old Letters Collected to Give Thoughts for Club Work" by Rosalie Q. Duncan. It contains quotations and clippings.

Back to Top

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938.

About 2400 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

This series contains extensive personal correspondence of Rose Duncan Lovell, granddaughter of General Quitman and daughter of Antonia Quitman Lovell and William Storrow Lovell. These papers chiefly from 1889 to 1916, consist of letters received by Rose while she was living in Savannah, Ga.; Palmyra, Miss.; Sewanee, Tenn.; Baltimore, Md.; Washington, D.C., and elsewhere. Among the correspondents are her mother Antonia Quitman Lovell; her brother William Storrow Lovell ("Tod"); her sister in law Caroline Couper Lovell; James Craig Morris between 1889 and 1899; Thomas Pinckney, Jr., in 1896; Walter Whitman; and a number of residents of Sewanee, Tennessee. These letters pertain chiefly to family matters, social events, and Rose Lovell's travels and illnesses. There are also a few miscellaneous writings included.

Folder 290

1866-1877 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 290

Folder 291

1878 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 291

Folder 292

1879-1880 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 292

Folder 293

1881-1884 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 293

Folder 294

1885-1887 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 294

Folder 295

1888-June 1889 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 295

Folder 296

July-November 1889 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 296

Folder 297

December 1889 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 297

Folder 298-301

Folder 298

Folder 299

Folder 300

Folder 301

1890 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 298-301

Folder 302-311

Folder 302

Folder 303

Folder 304

Folder 305

Folder 306

Folder 307

Folder 308

Folder 309

Folder 310

Folder 311

1891 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 302-311

Folder 312-315

Folder 312

Folder 313

Folder 314

Folder 315

1892 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 312-315

Folder 316-319

Folder 316

Folder 317

Folder 318

Folder 319

1893 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 316-319

Folder 320-323

Folder 320

Folder 321

Folder 322

Folder 323

1894 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 320-323

Folder 324-327

Folder 324

Folder 325

Folder 326

Folder 327

1895 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 324-327

Folder 328-334

Folder 328

Folder 329

Folder 330

Folder 331

Folder 332

Folder 333

Folder 334

1896 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 328-334

Folder 335-340

Folder 335

Folder 336

Folder 337

Folder 338

Folder 339

Folder 340

1897 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 335-340

Folder 341-346

Folder 341

Folder 342

Folder 343

Folder 344

Folder 345

Folder 346

1898 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 341-346

Folder 347-353

Folder 347

Folder 348

Folder 349

Folder 350

Folder 351

Folder 352

Folder 353

1899 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 347-353

Folder 354-356

Folder 354

Folder 355

Folder 356

1900 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 354-356

Folder 357

1901 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 357

Folder 358-359

Folder 358

Folder 359

1902 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 358-359

Folder 360-361

Folder 360

Folder 361

1903 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 360-361

Folder 362-363

Folder 362

Folder 363

1904 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 362-363

Folder 364-366

Folder 364

Folder 365

Folder 366

1905 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 364-366

Folder 367-368

Folder 367

Folder 368

1906 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 367-368

Folder 369-371

Folder 369

Folder 370

Folder 371

1907 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 369-371

Folder 372-374

Folder 372

Folder 373

Folder 374

1908 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 372-374

Folder 375-378

Folder 375

Folder 376

Folder 377

Folder 378

1909 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 375-378

Folder 379-381

Folder 379

Folder 380

Folder 381

1910 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 379-381

Folder 382-384

Folder 382

Folder 383

Folder 384

1911 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 382-384

Folder 385-389

Folder 385

Folder 386

Folder 387

Folder 388

Folder 389

1912 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 385-389

Folder 390-392

Folder 390

Folder 391

Folder 392

1913 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 390-392

Folder 393-395

Folder 393

Folder 394

Folder 395

1914 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 393-395

Folder 396-397

Folder 396

Folder 397

1915 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 396-397

Folder 398-406

Folder 398

Folder 399

Folder 400

Folder 401

Folder 402

Folder 403

Folder 404

Folder 405

Folder 406

1916 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 398-406

Folder 407-409

Folder 407

Folder 408

Folder 409

1917 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 407-409

Folder 410-411

Folder 410

Folder 411

1918 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 410-411

Folder 412-414

Folder 412

Folder 413

Folder 414

1919 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 412-414

Folder 415

1920 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 415

Folder 416

1921 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 416

Folder 417

1922-1924 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 417

Folder 418

1925-1926 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 418

Folder 419

1927 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 419

Folder 420

1928-1929 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 420

Folder 421-422

Folder 421

Folder 422

1930 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 421-422

Folder 423-424

Folder 423

Folder 424

1931 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 423-424

Folder 425

1932-1936 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 425

Folder 426

1937-1938 #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 426

Folder 427-445

Folder 427

Folder 428

Folder 429

Folder 430

Folder 431

Folder 432

Folder 433

Folder 434

Folder 435

Folder 436

Folder 437

Folder 438

Folder 439

Folder 440

Folder 441

Folder 442

Folder 443

Folder 444

Folder 445

Undated #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 427-445

Folder 446-451

Folder 446

Folder 447

Folder 448

Folder 449

Folder 450

Folder 451

Miscellaneous Writings #00616, Series: "4. Rose Duncan Lovell Papers, 1866-1938." Folder 446-451

Back to Top

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated.

37 items.

Arrangement: by subject and chronological.

Image P-616/1

Photograph of a daguerreotype of General John A. Quitman taken circa 1850 in New Orleans #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/1

Image P-616/2

Engraving of John A. Quitman in United States Army uniform, mounted, from a painting by Chappel, published by Johnson, Fry and Co., New York, circa 1864. It depicts a battle of the Mexican War in 1836. #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/2

Image P-616/3-4

P-616/3

P-616/4

Undated engraving of John A. Quitman made from the U.S. Democratic Review #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/3-4

Image P-616/5

Photograph of a portrait of Dr. Frederick Henry Quitman, father of John A. Quitman, in carte-de-visite form, dated 1897 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/5

Image P-616/6

Captain W.S. Lovell at his tent at Pensacola, Fla., in April 1861 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/6

Image P-616/7

J.G. Duncan, 1879 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/7

Image P-616/8

Mary Deurville Lovell, circa 1890 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/8

Image P-616/9

Mary Clayton Goffe, about age 5, circa 1900 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/9

Image P-616/10

Judge Edward Turner, copy of a portrait, undated #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/10

Image P-616/11

General Robert E. Lee, carte-de-visite, undated #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/11

Image P-616/12

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Riches, Encino, Calif., 1980 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/12

Image P-616/13

Sketch of Monmouth, circa 1860s #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/13

Image P-616/14

Colored picture of the front view of Monmouth, circa 1900 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/14

Image P-616/15

Monmouth, front view, circa 1900 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/15

Image P-616/16

Monmouth, sundial, circa 1900 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/16

Image P-616/17

Monmouth, interior, dining room, circa 1900 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/17

Image P-616/18

Monmouth, interior, parlor, circa 1900 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/18

Image P-616/19

Monmouth, interior, library, circa 1900 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/19

Image P-616/20

Monmouth, front view, circa 1900 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/20

Image P-616/21

Monmouth, rear view and outbuilding, circa 1900 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/21

Image P-616/22

Monmouth, rear view and garden, circa 1900 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/22

Image P-616/23

Monmouth, side view, outbuilding and well, circa 1900 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/23

Image P-616/24

Monmouth, front porch, circa 1900 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/24

Image P-616/25

Monmouth, rose garden, circa 1900 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/25

Image P-616/26

Monmouth, front view, color, 1980 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/26

Image P-616/27

Monmouth, interior, dining room, 1980, restoration by Ronald Riches #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/27

Image P-616/28

Monmouth, interior, parlor, 1980, restoration by Ronald Riches #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/28

Image P-616/29

Orange Grove, Fla., residence of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Reed #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/29

Image P-616/30

Orange Grove, Fla., circa 1887 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/30

Image P-616/31

St. Johns River, Orange Grove, Fla., circa 1887 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/31

Image P-616/32

Mulberry Grove, Orange Grove, Fla., circa 1887 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/32

Image P-616/33

Somerset, residence of the Chotard family near Natchez, 1897 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/33

Image P-616/34

Gloucester, residence of the Sargent family, Natchez, undated #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/34

Image P-616/35

Carte-de-visite of an unidentified black woman, possibly a family servant, taken in Sewanee, Tenn., undated #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/35

Image P-616/36-37

P-616/36

P-616/37

Cabinet card of an unidentified woman, possibly A. Rosalie Quitman, taken in Philadelphia, circa 1855 #00616, Series: "5. Pictures, circa 1850-1980 and undated." P-616/36-37

Back to Top

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Items Separated

Back to Top

Processing Information

Processed by: Shonra Newman, Suzanne Ruffing, February 1996

Encoded by: Joseph Nicholson, April 2006

This inventory is based on an original inventory compiled in 1964 and prior to 1964. Most of the description, particularly for items dated after 1859, is an edited version of the original inventory.

This collection was processed with support from the Randleigh Foundation Trust.

Back to Top