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Collection Number: 20372

Collection Title: Southern Highland Handicraft Guild Collection, 1993-1995

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Collection Overview

Size 788 items (0.5 linear feet)
Abstract The Southern Highland Handicraft Guild is a non-profit educational organization with a focus on teaching people in the southern Appalachian mountains traditional handicrafts and providing market outlets for them. The Guild represents over 700 craftspeople in 293 counties of nine southeastern states. From 1993 to 1995, Georgia Wier, folklorist for the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild, with assistance from Ron Ruehl, Patience Bingham, and Betsy Baker, documented the handicraft work of individual, educational, and organizational members of the Guild in North Carolina. The documentation consisted of interviews with individual artists focusing on their craft and their association with the Guild and other folk art schools, organizations, or family businesses. The handicrafts of woodworking and weaving are particularly well represented, with a number of folk schools and artists documented. Also included are colonial knotting, pewter work, pottery, Hmong needlework, and dried flower arrangement.
Language English.
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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Information For Users

Restrictions to Access
Use of audio and video materials may require production of listening and viewing copies.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild Collection #20372, Southern Folklife Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Provenance
Received from Georgia Wier, 21 June 1995 (Acc. 99454).
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subject Headings

The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

These and related materials may be found under the following headings in online catalogs.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Historical Information

The Southern Highland Handicraft Guild traces its inception back to the late 1800s when Presbyterian missionary Frances Louisa Goodrich came to the mountains of North Carolina. Enchanted by the traditional woven coverlets the women were making, Goodrich started Allanstand Cottage Industries to assist mountain families economically while supporting the continuation of handicraft traditions. When Goodrich formed the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild with other leading members of the Southern Arts and Crafts Movement in 1930, she gave her business, now called the Allanstand Craft Shop, to the Guild to provide a retail outlet for the mountain crafts. Today the Allanstand Craft Shop is located in the Blue Ridge Parkway's Folk Art Center and is one of four shops operated by the Guild. The Southern Highland Handicraft Guild, a non-profit educational organization, focuses on training in and marketing of handicrafts by the people of southern Appalachia. It represents over 700 craftspeople in 293 counties of nine southeastern states.

In 1993, Georgia Wier, folklorist for the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild, started documenting some of the North Carolina artists in the Guild. The documentation project was funded by a grant from the Folklife Section of the North Carolina Arts Council with additional assistance from the John C. Campbell Folk School and the Christopher Mann Memorial Fund. The project, consisting of audio, video, and photographic documentation, was conducted from 1993 to 1995 primarily by Georgia Wier, with assistance from videographer Ron Ruehl, photographer Patience Bingham, and Betsy Baker.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Scope and Content

From 1993 to 1995, Georgia Wier, folklorist for the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild, documented the handicraft work of individual, educational, and organizational members of the Guild in North Carolina. The documentation consisted of interviews with individual artists focusing on their craft and their association with the Guild and any additional folk art school, organization, or family business. The artists were also audio and video recorded and photographed while working at their craft. The members of the Guild documented range from Nolan Beaver, a woodworker who joined the Brasstown Carvers in the 1930s, to Xee Yang, a Hmong needlework artist and recent member of the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild. Craft guilds and folk schools include the Brasstown Carvers at the John C. Campbell Folk School, the Weaving Room at Crossnore School, and the Nonah Craft Center. Family craft businesses include Woody's Chair Shop, ENDOFTHEROADCRAFTS, Pisgah Forest Pottery, and Riverwood Pewter Shop. The handicrafts of woodworking and weaving are particularly well represented, with a number of folk schools and artists documented. Also included are colonial knotting, pewter work, pottery, Hmong needlework, and dried flower arrangement.

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Contents list

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series Quick Links

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 1. Woodworking.

411 items.

Woodworking handicrafts documented consist primarily of carving, instrument making, and chair building. There is a particularly strong focus on the Brasstown Carvers, a carving association in Brasstown, N.C., with ties to the John C. Campbell Folk School. Many current and retired members of the Brasstown Carvers are documented. Artisans of the family-owned businesses Woody's Chair Shop and ENDOFTHEROADCRAFTS are interviewed and documented. Also included are individual artists: Frederick G. Smith, a Brasstown resident and woodworker, who is not a member of the Brasstown Carvers; Wade Martin, a woodworker in Swannanoa, N.C.' and Goingback Chiltoskey (G.B.) and Mary Chiltoskey, woodworkers in Cherokee, N.C.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.1. Brasstown Carvers.

105 items.

The Brasstown Carvers is one of the most successful programs of the John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown, N.C. Folklorist Georgia Wier documented this organization from 1993 to 1994. Brasstown Carver members and associates Nolan Beaver, Marylou Carpenter, Jack Carpenter, Martha Coffey, Helen Gibson, Abalee Ivester, Nell Lee, and Brandon Lee, Murrial Martin (Murray), James Morris, and Doris Reece are documented. Some of these individuals began carving with the Folk School in the 1930s. Murray Martin worked as a teacher and director of carving and weaving projects at the John C. Campbell Folk School starting in the 1930s. The Brasstown Carvers are video recorded at work at the John C. Campbell Folk School.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.1.1. Written Materials.

11 items.

Written materials consist of field notes, one interview transcript, and correspondence by folklorist Georgia Wier. The field notes cover Georgia Wier's first informational visit with a number of Brasstown Carvers at the John C. Campbell Folk School and a photograph session with carver James Morris. The transcript is of an interview with carver Helen Gibson, for which there is no corresponding audio recording included in the collection. The correspondence primarily consists of thank you notes from Georgia Wier to her consultants.

Folder 1

James Morris photo session field notes, 10 December 1993 #20372, Subseries: "1.1.1. Written Materials." Folder 1

Folder 2

Helen Gibson interview transcript, 15 November 1994 #20372, Subseries: "1.1.1. Written Materials." Folder 2

Folder 3

Brasstown Carvers general field notes, 9-11 December 1993 #20372, Subseries: "1.1.1. Written Materials." Folder 3

Folder 4

Correspondence #20372, Subseries: "1.1.1. Written Materials." Folder 4

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.1.2. Slides.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.1.3. Photographs.

1 item.

Photograph of Rabbit and Squirrel bookends carved by James Morris of the Brasstown Carvers.

P-4480 Rabbit and Squirrel bookends by James A. Morris, Brasstown Carvers, 10 December 1993 #20372, Subseries: "1.1.3. Photographs." Folder 12

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.1.4. Audio Recordings.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.1.5. Video Recordings.

8 items.

Ron Ruehl and Georgia Wier video recorded members of the Brasstown Carvers at work at the John C. Campbell Folk School, 25 March 1994. Both demonstrations and interviews were recorded. There is a complete video log associated with these video recordings. A small amount of additional footage of the grounds and shop at the John C. Campbell Folk School is also included at the beginning of VT-20372/9, the first video recording of Frederick G. Smith.

VT-20372/1-8 Brasstown Carvers at John C. Campbell Folk School, 25 March 1994 #20372, Subseries: "1.1.5. Video Recordings." Folder 12

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.2. Frederick G. Smith.

34 items.

Georgia Wier interviewed woodworker Frederick G. Smith in Brasstown, N.C., on 26 March 1994. Though he is a carver, his style is different enough from the Brasstown Carvers that he never considered joining, though he became a member of the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild and has worked at the John C. Campbell Folk School.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.2.1. Written Materials.

3 items.

The written materials consist of correspondence between folklorist Georgia Wier and Frederick G. Smith.

Folder 13

Correspondence #20372, Subseries: "1.2.1. Written Materials." Folder 13

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.2.2. Slides.

26 items.

Slides of Frederick G. Smith in his home and at an art fair, along with a number of examples of his carved trays, dishes, and figurines.

Folder 14

Slides of Frederick G. Smith, 26 March 1994, 17 September 1994 #20372, Subseries: "1.2.2. Slides." Folder 14

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.2.3. Photographs.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.2.4. Audio Recordings.

1 item.

Audio recording of an interview with Frederick G. Smith conducted by Georgia Wier. There is a tapelog associated with this recording.

FS-6465 Frederick G. Smith, 26 March 1994 #20372, Subseries: "1.2.4. Audio Recordings." Folder 14

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.2.5. Video Recordings.

3 items.

Georgia Wier and Ron Ruehl video recorded Frederick G. Smith working and talking about his craft in his home workshop. VT-20372/9 includes some footage of the grounds and shop at the John C. Campbell Folk School at the very beginning. There is a videolog associated with this recording.

VT-20372/9-11 Frederick G. Smith, 26 March 1994 #20372, Subseries: "1.2.5. Video Recordings." Folder 14

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.3. Woody's Chair Shop.

56 items.

Woody's Chair Shop in Spruce Pine, N.C., is a family-owned business. Arval Woody, fifth generation chairmaker and owner of Woody's Chair Shop, his wife Nora Woody, and woodworkers James Marcus, Ricky Hollifield, and Richard Hollifield were interviewed and documented at work by Georgia Wier in May and June 1994.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.3.1. Written Materials.

10 items.

The written materials include promotional materials about Woody's Chair Shop and thank-you letters from folklorist Georgia Wier.

Folder 15

Promotional Materials #20372, Subseries: "1.3.1. Written Materials." Folder 15

Folder 16

Correspondence #20372, Subseries: "1.3.1. Written Materials." Folder 16

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.3.2. Slides.

36 items.

Slides include shots of James Marcus, Ricky Hollifield, and Arval Woody making chairs in the workshop as well as chairs and other items for sale in the showroom of Woody's Chair Shop.

Folder 17

Slides of Woody's Chair Shop, 5 May 1994 #20372, Subseries: "1.3.2. Slides." Folder 17

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.3.3. Photographs.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.3.4. Audio Recordings.

2 items.

The audio recording includes Georgia Wier interviewing Arval Woody and Nora Woody as well as shop woodworkers James Marcus, Ricky Hollifield, and Richard Hollifield. There is a tape transcript associated with this recording.

FS-6466 Arval and Nora Woody, 5 May 1994 (tape 1 of 2) #20372, Subseries: "1.3.4. Audio Recordings." Folder 17

FS-6467 Arval and Nora Woody, 5 May 1994, continued (tape 2 of 2) #20372, Subseries: "1.3.4. Audio Recordings." Folder 17

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.3.5. Video Recordings.

6 items.

Recorded by Georgia Wier and Ron Ruehl on 2 June 1994, the videos show all the processes and stages involved in making a chair at Woody's Chair Shop. There is a videolog associated with these recordings.

VT-20372/12-17 Woody's Chair Shop, 2 June 1994 #20372, Subseries: "1.3.5. Video Recordings." Folder 17

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.4. Wade Martin.

35 items.

Woodcarver Wade Martin comes from a family of woodworkers. His son, Bruce Martin, also carves. His father, Marcus Martin, was an instrument maker. One of his brothers, Fred Martin, built furniture and operated Martin's Craft Shop. Georgia Wier interviewed Wade Martin in the company of his wife Frances Martin and sister Zenobia Parks to talk about his family's woodworking history on 27 October 1994.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.4.1. Written Materials.

5 items.

The complete transcript of Georgia Wier's interview with Wade Martin, Zenobia Parks, and Frances Martin is included, although no corresponding audio recording was received with the collection. Correspondence includes Georgia Wier's thank-you letters as well as a Christmas story about a poor woodcarver by Wade Martin.

Folder 18

Transcription of interview with Wade Martin, Zenobia Parks, and Frances Martin, 27 October 1994 #20372, Subseries: "1.4.1. Written Materials." Folder 18

Folder 19

Correspondence #20372, Subseries: "1.4.1. Written Materials." Folder 19

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.4.2. Slides.

30 items.

Slides include shots of Wade Martin, his wife Frances, and a variety of instruments and carvings made by members of the Martin family in their home.

Folder 20

Slides of Wade Martin and family, 27 October 1994 #20372, Subseries: "1.4.2. Slides." Folder 20

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.5. ENDOFTHEROADCRAFTS.

119 items.

Baxter Presnell, a woodcarver from Banner Elk, N.C., comes from a family of woodworkers. His father, Edd Presnell, was a dulcimer maker. Baxter taught his wife, Reva Presnell, to carve. They run a craft shop, ENDOFTHEROADCRAFTS, which employs various extended family members as carvers. Georgia Wier documented Baxter and Reva Presnell, as well as the extended family at work. Tangentially related documentation on Lorena Roberts and Vaughn Roberts is included, as originally received, with this material. Lorena Roberts is not a woodcarver or a member of the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild, but a distant relative and neighbor of Baxter and Reva Presnell, who does a number of handicrafts including quilting and corn shuck dolls.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.5.1. Written Materials.

7 items.

Tapelog and transcript of interviews conducted by Georgia Wier with Baxter Presnell and Reva Presnell and members of their extended family who work at ENDOFTHEROADCRAFTS. There are no audio recordings corresponding to these interviews in the collection. The interview with Lorena Roberts and Vaughn Roberts is tangentially related. It is included, as originally received, because Lorena Roberts, though not a woodcarver or a member of the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild, is a distant relative and neighbor of Baxter and Reva Presnell, who does a number of handicrafts including quilting and corn shuck dolls. Correspondence consists of thank-you letters from Georgia Wier to her consultants.

Folder 21

Tapelog of interview with Baxter and Reva Presnell, 29 September 1994 #20372, Subseries: "1.5.1. Written Materials." Folder 21

Folder 22

Transcript of interviews with Baxter Presnell, Reva Presnell, Marthana Ward, Jeff Ward, Beverly Ward, and Rosanna Napier at the ENDOFTHEROADCRAFTS workshop and with Lorena Roberts and Vaughn Roberts at their home, 3 December 1994 #20372, Subseries: "1.5.1. Written Materials." Folder 22

Folder 23

Correspondence #20372, Subseries: "1.5.1. Written Materials." Folder 23

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.5.2. Slides.

112 items.

Slides show Baxter Presnell and Reva Presnell in their home, samples of furniture and carvings made by members of the family, Baxter Presnell, Reva Presnell, Marthana Ward, Jeff Ward, Beverly Ward, and Rosanna Napier working at the ENDOFTHEROADCRAFTS workshop and their booth at a Southern Highland Handicraft Guild art fair. Slides of Lorena Roberts and her corn shuck dolls are included here as well.

Folder 24

Slides of the Presnell extended family, 29 September 19, 23 October 1994, 3 December 1994 #20372, Subseries: "1.5.2. Slides." Folder 24

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.6. Goingback (G. B.) and Mary Chiltoskey.

62 items.

Goingback Chiltoskey (G. B.) and Mary Chiltoskey are woodcarvers in Cherokee, N.C. Besides separate interviews with G. B. and Mary Chiltoskey, a tangentially related interview with Molly Blankenship is included, as received, with this material. Georgia Wier interviewed Molly Blankenship in the company of G. B. and Mary Chiltoskey to address concerns among Cherokee craftspeople that Cherokee craft designs and techniques not be copied. Wier wanted to make sure that the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild documentation project would pose no problem to Cherokee artists whom she hoped to include in her documentation.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.6.1. Written Materials.

5 items.

Correspondence includes letters between Georgia Wier and Goingback (G. B.) and Mary Chiltoskey. The interview with Molly Blankenship was not audio recorded. Georgia Wier's field notes for the interview include information about Lula Owl Gloyne, Molly Blankenship's mother, who was a weaver.

Folder 25

Correspondence #20372, Subseries: "1.6.1. Written Materials." Folder 25

Folder 26

Field notes of interview with Molly Blankenship, 1 November 1994 #20372, Subseries: "1.6.1. Written Materials." Folder 26

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.6.2. Slides.

51 items.

Pictures of Goingback (G. B.) Chiltoskey and Mary Chiltoskey at home, work, and at a Southern Highland Handicraft Guild fair. Also samples of their carvings, including a violin made by G. B. Chiltoskey.

Folder 27

Slides of Goingback (G. B.) and Mary Chiltoskey, 18 July 1993, 16 May 1994 #20372, Subseries: "1.6.2. Slides." Folder 27

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.6.3. Photographs.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 1.6.4. Audio Recordings.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 2. Weaving.

106 items.

Documentation of weavers in the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild focuses on two educational centers: the Weaving Room of Crossnore School in Crossnore, N.C., and the Nonah Craft Center in Franklin, N.C. Interviews particularly highlight 1998 North Carolina Folk Heritage Award winner Ossie Clark Phillips and Eleanor Hjemmet (Ellie) at the Weaving Room of Crossnore School and Sally Kesler at the Nonah Arts Center.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.1. The Weaving Room at Crossnore School.

47 items.

The Weaving Room at Crossnore School was founded by Mary Martin Sloop in 1923 to provide training, work, and income for local mountain women. The Weaving Room is an organizational and Charter Member of the Southern Highland Handicrafts Guild. Ossie Clark Phillips, manager of the Weaving Room from the early 1960s to 1986, is featured in the video recordings. Ossie Clark Phillips started weaving at age nine and became a weaver at the Weaving Room at age 13. Eleanor (Ellie) Hjemmet, then manager of the Weaving Room, was also interviewed in audio and video recordings.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.1.1. Written Materials.

16 items.

Written materials include promotional materials and newspaper articles about Crossnore School and the Weaving Room and Georgia Wier's thank-you letters to her consultants.

Folder 28

Promotional Materials #20372, Subseries: "2.1.1. Written Materials." Folder 28

Folder 29

Articles #20372, Subseries: "2.1.1. Written Materials." Folder 29

Folder 30

Correspondence #20372, Subseries: "2.1.1. Written Materials." Folder 30

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.1.2. Slides.

23 items.

Slides show the weavers at the Weaving Room at Crossnore School and some samples of their work.

Folder 31

Slides of the Weaving Room, 11 May 1994 #20372, Subseries: "2.1.2. Slides." Folder 31

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.1.3. Photographs.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.1.4. Audio Recordings.

2 items.

Georgia Wier interviewed Eleanor (Ellie) Hjemmet, then manager of the Weaving Room at Crossnore School, and weavers  Virginia Coffey, Shirley Gragg, Sheila Clark, and Cynthia Coffey while working on 11 May 1994. There is an accompanying tape log for this interview.

FS-6471 Eleanor (Ellie) Hjemmet and weavers at the Weaving Room, Crossnore School, 11 May 1994 (tape 1 of 2) #20372, Subseries: "2.1.4. Audio Recordings." Folder 31

FS-6472 Eleanor (Ellie) Hjemmet and weavers at the Weaving Room, Crossnore School, 11 May 1994, continued (tape 2 of 2) #20372, Subseries: "2.1.4. Audio Recordings." Folder 31

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.1.5. Video Recordings.

4 items.

Ossie Clark Phillips, former manager of the Weaving Room who started weaving there when she was thirteen years old, and Eleanor (Ellie) Hjemmet, then manager, were video recorded by Betsy Baker and Ron Ruehl on 2 May 1995. There is no accompanying video log for these recordings.

VT-20372/18-19 Interview with Ossie Clark Phillips, 2 May 1995 #20372, Subseries: "2.1.5. Video Recordings." Folder 31

VT-20372/20 Interview with Eleanor (Ellie) Hjemmet, 2 May 1995 #20372, Subseries: "2.1.5. Video Recordings." Folder 31

VT-20372/21 The Weaving Room at Crossnore School, 2 May 1995 #20372, Subseries: "2.1.5. Video Recordings." Folder 31

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.2. Nonah Craft Center.

59 items.

The Nonah Craft Center in Franklin, N.C., was founded in 1947 by Reverend Rufus Morgan, brother of Lucy Morgan, the founder of Penland School of Handicrafts. The Center became an education center member of the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild in 1959. Sally Kesler, a weaver and silk screen artist who trained at Penland School of Handicrafts, became the Director of the Nonah Craft Center in 1952. Georgia Wier interviewed Sally Kesler and her weaving students on 28 June 1994.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.2.1. Written Materials.

10 items.

Prior to conducting this documentation project for the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild, Georgia Wier had interviewed Sally Kesler on 27 June 1993. Wier included a copy of the transcript for that interview with her Guild documentation because of its useful background information. There is no accompanying audio recording in this collection. Also included in the written materials are newspaper articles about Sally Kesler and her silk screening and weaving work and correspondence between Georgia Wier and her consultants.

Folder 32

Transcript of interview with Sally Kesler, 27 June 1993 #20372, Subseries: "2.2.1. Written Materials." Folder 32

Folder 33

Articles #20372, Subseries: "2.2.1. Written Materials." Folder 33

Folder 34

Correspondence #20372, Subseries: "2.2.1. Written Materials." Folder 34

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.2.2. Slides.

47 items.

Slides show the weavers of the Nonah Craft Center, working in the weaving shop, and Sally Kesler's silk screen prints.

Folder 35

Slides of Nonah Craft Center, 28 June 1994 #20372, Subseries: "2.2.2. Slides." Folder 35

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 2.2.3. Audio Recordings.

2 items.

Georgia Wier interviewed Sally Kesler, her weaving students, and Don and Frances McLean on 28 June 1994. Frances McLean is the daughter of Rufus Morgan, the founder of Nonah Craft Center. There is a tape log associated with this interview.

FS-6473 Interview with Sally Kesler, 28 June 1994 (tape 1 of 2) #20372, Subseries: "2.2.3. Audio Recordings." Folder 35

FS-6474 Interview with Sally Kesler, continued (tape 2 of 2) #20372, Subseries: "2.2.3. Audio Recordings." Folder 35

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 3. Other Handicrafts.

271 items.

Other handicrafts documented by folklorist Georgia Wier for the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild include pottery, pewter work, colonial knotting, dried flower art, and Hmong needlework. Businesses included are Pisgah Forest Pottery and Riverwood Pewter Shop. Interviews with individual artists focused on Thomas Case, Ralph Morgan, Carmalee Craig, Hazel Whittington, and Xee Yang.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.1. Pisgah Forest Pottery.

67 items.

Pisgah Forest Pottery has been a member of the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild since 1932. It is renowned for its crystalline glazed pots and cameo ware both developed by Stephen Case. Thomas Case, step-grandson of Walter Stephens, the founder of Pisgah Forest Pottery, and his wife, Dorothy Case, were the focus of Georgia Wier's documentation.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.1.1. Written Materials.

4 items.

Promotional materials produced by the Pisgah Forest Pottery and Georgia Wier's field notes for a photo session at the pottery shop. The 21 June 1993 date on the field notes appears to be a typographical error as the slides that appear to correspond with the field notes are from 21 June 1994 and the rest of Wier's documentation is dated 1994.

Folder 36

Promotional materials #20372, Subseries: "3.1.1. Written Materials." Folder 36

Folder 37

Photo session field notes, 21 June 1993(4) #20372, Subseries: "3.1.1. Written Materials." Folder 37

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.1.2. Slides.

56 items.

Slides of Pisgah Forest Pottery show the workshop, showroom, and Thomas Case and Grady Ledbetter at work turning pots.

Folder 38

Slides of Pisgah Forest Pottery, 17 June 1994, 21 June 1994 #20372, Subseries: "3.1.2. Slides." Folder 38

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.1.3. Photographs.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.1.4. Audio Recordings.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.1.5. Video Recordings.

3 items.

Betsy Baker and Ron Ruehl video recorded pottery workshop demonstrations and conducted interviews at the Pisgah Forest Pottery on 11 May 1995. There is no video log associated with this material.

VT-20372/22-24 Pisgah Forest Pottery, 11 May 1995 #20372, Subseries: "3.1.5. Video Recordings." Folder 38

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.2. Riverwood Pewter Shop.

62 items.

Ralph Morgan was an early member of the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild. He began crafting hand-hammered pewter household items in 1930 when he was in his last year of high school. The craft business financed his way through the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill and then the University of Chicago. When he returned to North Carolina as a doctor, he taught the craft to local folks. The present Riverwood Pewter Shop in Dillsboro, N.C., was started by Mrs. Morgan and is managed by the Morgans's eldest daughter, Ruth McConnell.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.2.1. Written Materials.

2 items.

Correspondence consists of Georgia Wier's thank-you letters to her consultants.

Folder 39

Correspondence #20372, Subseries: "3.2.1. Written Materials." Folder 39

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.2.2. Slides.

57 items.

Slides show the Riverwood Pewter Shop, samples of pewter household items, Ralph Morgan, Ruth McConnell, and pewter workers Leo Franks, Ouida Gold, and Dee Shook making pewter pieces.

Folder 40

Slides of Riverwood Pewter Shop, 27 May 1994, 30 June 1994 #20372, Subseries: "3.2.2. Slides." Folder 40

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.2.3.Audio Recordings.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.3. Colonial Knotting.

37 items.

Carmalee Craig in Blowing Rock, N.C., learned how to do colonial knotting, a form of needlework, from Bertha Cook, a Southern Highland Handicraft Guild member. Her aunt, Georgia Coffey, also taught her how to tie fringe. At the time Georgia Wier interviewed Carmalee Craig in 1993 and 1994, she was the only member of the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild doing colonial knotting.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.3.1. Written Materials.

1 item.

Written materials consist of Georgia Wier's field notes for an unrecorded interview with Carmalee Craig on 2 August 1993.

Folder 41

Field notes, 2 August 1993 #20372, Subseries: "3.3.1. Written Materials." Folder 41

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.3.2. Slides.

33 items.

Slides show Carmalee Craig doing colonial knotting, samples of her work, and her fringe loom made by her husband Lank Craig with work in progress.

Folder 42

Slides of Carmalee Craig, 3 August 1993, 10 May 1994 #20372, Subseries: "3.3.2. Slides." Folder 42

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.3.3. Photographs.

1 item.

Photograph of a bedspread in a sunflower pattern made by Georgia Coffey (knotting) and Carmalee Craig (fringe).

P-4491 Bedspread by Georgia Coffey and Carmalee Craig, 10 May 1994 #20372, Subseries: "3.3.3. Photographs." Folder 42

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.3.4. Audio Recordings.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.4. Dried Flower Arrangement.

19 items.

Hazel Whittington grows and gathers decorative plants, which she arranges into wreaths, swags, and centerpieces. She lives with her husband Clyde on their farm in the Mills River Valley of Henderson County, N.C.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.4.1. Written Materials.

3 items.

Written materials consist of Georgia Wier's field notes for an unrecorded interview and a photo session with Hazel Whittington and a thank-you note from Georgia Wier.

Folder 43

Field notes, 7 December 1994, 17 September 1994 #20372, Subseries: "3.4.1. Written Materials." Folder 43

Folder 44

Correspondence #20372, Subseries: "3.4.1. Written Materials." Folder 44

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.4.2. Slides.

15 items.

Hazel Whittington and Clyde Whittington with samples of Hazel Whittington's dried flower arrangements at a Southern Highland Handicraft Guild fair.

Folder 45

Slides of Hazel Whittington, 17 September 1994, 23 October 1994 #20372, Subseries: "3.4.2. Slides." Folder 45

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.4.3. Photographs.

1 item.

Portrait of Hazel Whittington with one of her wreaths.

P-4492 Hazel Whittington, 23 October 1994 #20372, Subseries: "3.4.3. Photographs." Folder 45

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.5. Hmong Textile Arts.

86 items.

Xee Yang does Hmong needlework, including pandau, cross-stitch, embroidery, and reverse applique in flower designs and story cloths. She came to the United States in 1979. When Georgia Wier interviewed her in 1994, she had been an active member of Southern Highland Handicraft Guild for eight years.

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.5.1. Written Materials.

14 items.

The tapelog is for an interview with Xee Yang, with translation assistance from her son Frankie Lo, on 6 October 1994. Additional field notes cover a photo session on 22 October 1994 and the Hmong New Year Southeast celebration on 26 November 1994. There are no associated audio recordings for any of these dates in this collection. Promotional material includes fliers about the Hmong New Year Southeast celebration and textile resources for Hmong needleworkers. The correspondence between Georgia Wier and Xee Yang is also included.

Folder 46

Tapelog and field notes, 6 October 1994, 22 October 1994, and 26 November 1994 #20372, Subseries: "3.5.1. Written Materials." Folder 46

Folder 47

Promotional materials #20372, Subseries: "3.5.1. Written Materials." Folder 47

Folder 48

Correspondence #20372, Subseries: "3.5.1. Written Materials." Folder 48

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.5.2. Slides.

71 items.

Slides show Xee Yang at home and at the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild fair, samples of her work, and the traditional clothing, games, and food preparation at the Hmong New Year Southeast celebration.

Folder 49

Slides of Xee Yang, 6 October 1994, 26 November 1994, 23 October 1994 #20372, Subseries: "3.5.2. Slides." Folder 49

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Subseries 3.5.3. Photographs.

1 item.

Xee Yang's son Frankie Lo in traditional Hmong clothing at the Hmong New Year Southeast celebration.

P-4493 Frankie Lo in traditional Hmong clothing, 26 November 1994 (negative only) #20372, Subseries: "3.5.3. Photographs." Folder 49

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Items Separated

Items separated include photographs (P-4480 - P-4493), audio recordings (FS-6458 - FS-6481), and video recordings (VT-20372/1 - VT-20372/24).

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