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Collection Number: 04121

Collection Title: Springs Family Papers, 1772-1924

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the World Wide Web. See the FAQ section for more information.


Funding from the Watson-Brown Foundation, Inc., supported the encoding of this finding aid.

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Size 8.0 feet of linear shelf space (approximately 4,500 items)
Abstract The Springs family of Mecklenburg County, N.C., and York District, S.C., included John Springs III (1782-1853) and his son, Andrew Baxter Springs (1819-1886), both of whom resided at and managed Springfield Plantation, York District, S.C.; served in the South Carolina legislature; and were stockholders and directors of various banks, railroads, and manufacturing firms. Other family members included Mary Springs (1778-1834), the wife of John Springs III, and Julia Blandina Baxter Springs (1827-1902), the wife of Andrew Baxter Springs and daughter of Eli Harris Baxter (1778-1866) and Julia Richardson Baxter of Hancock County, Ga., and Cherokee County, Tex. The collection consists of family, personal, and business papers, chiefly 1845-1870, of the Springs and related families, including much Baxter family correspondence. Family and personal correspondence document daily activities and concerns of plantation life. Letters report news of family and friends, school life, social life and conditions, and frequently comment on politics. The lives of plantation women and children are particularly well documented. Business papers document various agricultural and financial ventures in which the Springs and Baxter families were involved, especially management of crops, slavery, and livestock at the family plantations in South Carolina, Georgia, and Texas. There are also papers concerning investments in railroads, including the Charlotte and South Carolina Railroad; South Carolina banks; and the Graniteville Manufacturing Company, a South Carolina textile firm. Civil War materials chiefly relate to service in the South Carolina First Cavalry and the Sixth Regiment of South Carolina Volunteers, and to Baxter Springs's work as commissioner of the board that provided relief to the families of York District soldiers. Post Civil War materials comment on Reconstruction politics, freedmen, and race relations in the South. Also included are letters from individuals who moved west that give fairly detailed accounts of life on the frontier before and after the Civil War.
Creator Springs family.
Language English
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Restrictions to Access
No restrictions. Open for research.
Copyright Notice
Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.
Preferred Citation
[Identification of item], in the Springs Family Papers #4121, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Alternate Form of Material
Microfilm copy (filmed 1978) available.
  • Reel 1: folders 1b-24
  • Reel 2: folders 25-48
  • Reel 3: folders 49-73
  • Reel 4: folders 74-99
  • Reel 5: folders 100-120
  • Reel 6: folders 121-151
  • Reel 7: folders 152-192
  • Reel 8: folders 193-208
  • Reel 9: folders 209-242
  • Reel 10: folders 243-262
Acquisitions Information
Manuscripts lent for filming by Mr. and Mrs. Eli Baxter Springs of Matthews, N.C., in 1977. Original manuscripts received from Katherine Springs of Charlotte, N.C., in October 1991.
Additional Descriptive Resources
Original finding aid is filed in folder 1a.
Sensitive Materials Statement
Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, the North Carolina Public Records Act (N.C.G.S. § 132 1 et seq.), and Article 7 of the North Carolina State Personnel Act (Privacy of State Employee Personnel Records, N.C.G.S. § 126-22 et seq.). Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g., a cause of action under common law for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill assumes no responsibility.
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The following terms from Library of Congress Subject Headings suggest topics, persons, geography, etc. interspersed through the entire collection; the terms do not usually represent discrete and easily identifiable portions of the collection--such as folders or items.

Clicking on a subject heading below will take you into the University Library's online catalog.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Biographical Information

The Springs family of North and South Carolina are descended from the Springsteens, a Dutch family who migrated to New York in the middle of the 17th century. One line of the Springsteens later shortened their name, moved to Delaware, and from there to Mecklenburg County, N.C., circa 1776. John Springs, who led the move to North Carolina, bought property near the Square in Charlotte, as well as property in the Providence area of the county. His sons, John Springs Jr. (1751-1818) and Richard Springs (1754-1833), both of whom served in the Revolution, together amassed much greater property holdings.

John Springs Jr. resided at his father's plantation in Providence, but acquired three plantations in Lincoln County, N.C., large tracts of land on Sugar and Steele Creeks, and additional lots near the Square in Charlotte and in what later became the Myers Park area of the city. He also obtained mineral rights for some of his Mecklenburg lands and later was involved in gold mining. His brother Richard bought a tract of land on Big Sugar Creek in Lancaster District, S.C., and moved there shortly after the Revolution.

Both brothers invested in business ventures. Richard, in particular, invested in bank stocks. His son and grandson, John Springs III (1782-1853) and Andrew Baxter Springs (1819-1886), continued his practice of investing, first in banks, then in railroads, cotton mills, and other kinds of companies.

John Springs III, at the time of his marriage to his cousin Mary Springs (1778-1834) in 1806, moved to the Indian Land section of York District, S.C., a short distance from his father's Lancaster plantation, and built Springfield. At his death in 1853, his property, including lands in York District, Lancaster District, Lincoln County, and downtown Charlotte, and most of his stocks were divided among his surviving five children: Richard Austin Springs (1807-1876), who served in the South Carolina Legislature; Leroy Springs (1811-1863), who went into the mercantile business; Laura Springs Davidson (1813-1872); Andrew Baxter Springs, who served in the South Carolina Legislature, developed extensive business investments, and succeeded his father at Springfield Plantation; and Sophia Springs Myers (1821-1883).

The Springs intermarried with several other early and prominent Mecklenburg County families, in particular the Alexanders, Baxters, Moores, and the Davidsons. The Baxters, who figure importantly in these papers, had migrated to Mecklenburg from Lancaster County, Penna., just prior to the Revolution. Richard Springs married Jean Baxter (1761-1804), whose brother Andrew Baxter (1759-1816) moved to Georgia following the Revolution. Andrew Baxter's oldest son, Eli Harris Baxter (1778-1866), established himself in Hancock County, Ga., where he was a judge and the owner of a large plantation called Cornucopia. Judge Baxter also acquired a great deal of land near Alto, Tex., early in the 1850s. From then until his death in 1866, he divided his time between the management of his Texas and Georgia plantations. One of Judge Baxter and Julia Richardson Baxter's daughters, Julia Blandina Baxter (1827-1902), married her cousin Andrew Baxter Springs in 1850.

The children of "Baxter" and "Blandie" Springs, in particular Eli Baxter Springs (1852-1933), Brevard Davidson Springs (1860-1936), and Leroy Springs (1861-1931), became active in business and politics. Eli Springs became mayor of Charlotte, N.C., and later a member of the New York Stock Exchange. Brevard Springs and Leroy Springs acquired a number of cotton mills that later became Spring Mills Inc., under the management of Leroy's son Elliott White Springs.

Biographical and genealogical information is derived from the following sources: Katherine Wooten Springs, The Squires of Springfield (Charlotte: William Loftin, 1965), and Julia Amanda Springs Gibson, Lineage and Tradition of the Family of John Springs III (Atlanta: Foote and Davies Company, 1921).

See also the original finding aid, filed in folder 1a, for genealogical charts and additional biographical information embedded in series descriptions.

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Scope and Content

The collection consists of family, personal, and business papers, chiefly 1845-1870, of the Springs and related families of Mecklenburg County, N.C., and York District, S.C., and the Baxter family of Hancock County, Ga., and Cherokee County, Tex. The papers are chiefly those of John Springs III (1782-1853), his first wife Mary Springs (1778-1834), his son Andrew Baxter Springs (1819-1886), and Baxter's wife, Julia Blandina Baxter Springs (1827-1902), and concern family; social life and conditions; politics; agricultural and financial ventures; the Civil War and Reconstruction; and frontier life. The papers were organized by the donor into two series, each arranged chronologically. The first series is comprised almost entirely of correspondence; the second series is much smaller and contains financial, legal, and military papers.

Series 1. Correspondence contains many family, personal, and business materials that document the daily activities and concerns of plantation life. Letters report news of family and friends, school life, social life and conditions, including improprieties and crimes, and frequently comment on politics. The lives of plantation women and children are particularly well documented. Business materials relate to various ventures in which the Springs and Baxter families were involved, especially the management of crops, slaves, and livestock at Springfield plantation in South Carolina, Cornucopia plantation in Georgia, and other family plantations in Texas.

Other business papers concern investments in banks, railroads, and manufacturing. Correspondence, mainly letters from officers, directors, and stockholders, begins in 1842 and continues throughout the papers. Some of these letters are very brief and routine, announcing dividends, stockholders meetings, etc., while others are extremely detailed and candid in their comments on individuals and on business conditions. The chief companies discussed are the Bank of Hamburg, Bank of Camden, Merchants Bank of Cheraw, and Bank of Chester, all of South Carolina; the Charlotte and South Carolina Railroad; and the Graniteville Manufacturing Company, a South Carolina textile firm.

There are numerous papers for the Civil War period, many of which relate to the 6th South Carolina Infantry Regiment and the 1st South Carolina Cavalry Regiment. Many members of these regiments were from York District, and many of them wrote to Baxter Springs, who was a commissioner for the board that provided relief to soldiers' families in York District. These letters and other correspondence document civilian wartime conditions in York District, S.C., at Springfield plantation and in Texas; camp life and battles in Virginia; Confederate politics; and slave wartime experiences. Post Civil War materials contain many comments on Reconstruction politics, on the system of freed labor, and on race relations in the South.

Also included is the fairly frequent correspondence of individuals of differing social classes who moved west to Alabama, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Texas before and after the Civil War. A number of these people were overseers who had worked for John Springs III and Baxter Springs. Many of their letters describe conditions in the places they settled and indicate the extent to which their hopes for prosperity were being realized or disappointed. There also are numerous letters about Texas from Baxter Springs' brother-in-law, William R. Myers of Charlotte, N.C., and father-in-law, Judge Eli H. Baxter of Hancock County, Ga., both of whom owned plantations in Texas where they spent part of their time.

Series 2. Other Papers contains financial, legal, and military papers that document slavery, cotton, livestock, medical care, plantation improvements, transfer of Native American land, estate settlements, investments in banks and railroads, raising and outfitting South Carolina troops, and the work of the Soldier's Relief Board. Materials include receipts, accounts, stocks, bonds, marriage agreements, wills, inventories, land surveys and plats, broadsides, and Confederate military and administrative papers.

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Contents list

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series Quick Links

expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated.

About 3,200 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Series 1 consists of family, personal, and business correspondence of the Springs and related families of Mecklenburg County, N.C., and York District, S.C., and the Baxter family of Hancock County, Ga., and Cherokee County, Tex.

1797-1829 Papers are chiefly those of Mary Springs (1778-1834), and consist of letters from her husband John Springs III (1782-1853), their children, and other Springs and Alexander family members. Topics include family and local news, the availability and price of slaves, business conditions in Philadelphia, quilting, and whooping cough.
1830-1844 Papers chiefly involve John Springs III and several of his and Mary's children, including Mary Laura Springs (1813-1872), Leroy Springs (1811-1863), Sophia Springs (1821-1883), Richard Austin Springs (1807-1876), and especially Andrew Baxter Springs (1819-1886). Letters discuss family, including Leroy's mercantile business; school life; the estate of Eli Springs; plantation concerns, including slave health and productivity, crops, and raising and exhibiting livestock; and investments and business dealings with the Bank of Hamburg and other companies. Letters also provide fatherly advice; impressions of Philadelphia, Charlotte, N.C., and various warm springs resorts in North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia; and commentaries on the tariff controversy, nullification, currency, the U.S. Bank, and South Carolina politics. Also mentioned briefly are gold mining; crime, including a theft committed against a free African American and a murder committed by a runaway slave; prices and politics in Alabama; and warfare with Native Americans in Perry County, Ala.
1845-1853 Papers are a mixture of family and personal correspondence and John Springs III's business correspondence. Letters comment on family news; politics, including secession and the affairs of the South Carolina legislature; general business and economic conditions; investments in North Carolina and South Carolina banks and railroads, including the Bank of Hamburg, Bank of Camden, Merchants Bank of Cheraw, Bank of Cape Fear, the Charlotte and South Carolina Railroad and other railroads; the Graniteville Manufacturing Company; cotton prices and speculation; and slave health, crops, and livestock at Springfield plantation. Other topics briefly mentioned include the affairs of single women; Cornucopia plantation matters; travel to and society in North Carolina, South Carolina, and northern cities; the slave trade; a slave suicide and attempted slave infanticide; sexual promiscuity and prostitution in Charleston, S.C.; and crimes, including patricide, larceny, and arson.
Beginning is this time period and continuing through the years following the Civil War, the collection includes a number of letters that describe conditions in Arkansas, Monroe County, Miss., Shelby County, Tenn., Perry County, Ala., and Cass County, Tex., where former Springs overseers had relocated and other family members, including Baxter Springs' brother-in-law, William R. Myers of Charlotte, N.C., and father-in-law, Judge Eli H. Baxter of Hancock County, Ga., had acquired additional property. These letters remark on crops, prices, land, farming methods, and slave violence, and indicate the extent to which their hopes for prosperity were being realized or disappointed.
1854-1860 Papers, 1854-1860, are a mixture of family, personal, and business correspondence, chiefly addressed to Baxter Springs and his wife Blandie Springs. Letters discuss the settlement of the estate of John Springs III, including the difficulties of transferring stock to married women; the affairs of Richard Clark Springs, half brother of John Springs III, at Cedar Spring Asylum for deaf and mute students; improvements to Springfield and to property in Statesville, N.C.; plantation affairs at Cornucopia, Marietta, and Mt. Zion in Georgia; hard times, illness, and labor needs at the family plantations in Texas; cotton crops and markets; politics and campaigns, including the Know Nothing party in Georgia, the Texas House of Representatives, and the Kansas controversy; and the administration of the Charlotte and South Carolina Railroad and Blue Ridge Railroad, the banks in Chester, Cheraw, Hamburg, and Newberry, the Graniteville Manufacturing Company, and various other stock investments. Other topics briefly mentioned include anticipation of war; runaway slaves; slave punishment; roads and river transportation; improper administration of a Native American land treaty; slavery and the possibility of reopening the African slave trade; and the arrest of a white family rumored to have aided the planning of slave rebellion.
1861-1865 Papers include many letters sent to Baxter Springs by members of the 6th South Carolina Infantry Regiment, Company B, and the 1st South Carolina Cavalry Regiment because of his service as a commissioner for the distribution of relief to soldiers' families in York District. There are also a number of letters from Frank B. Sexton, a friend and distant relative of the Springs and the Baxter families, who lived near San Augustine, Tex., and who served in the Confederate Congress. These letters and other family, personal, and business correspondence document civilian wartime conditions in York District, S.C.; camp life and battle conditions in Virginia; raising troops and procurement of food and supplies; defense of the South Carolina coast; political races; and internal struggles of the Confederate government, including public debt and scarcity of commodities. Other topics mentioned briefly include rumors of crimes against white women by slaves and against slave women by Yankee soldiers; providing food for Confederate soldiers passing Springfield and encamped near Texas Plantation; exemptions from military service; refugees in Shreveport; slaves at James Island and Sullivans Island; troop morale and desertion; political rights and civil liberty for former slaves; and postwar race relations at Springfield plantation. Correspondence regarding Springs' investments and the affairs of various banks, railroads, and the Graniteville Manufacturing Company is diminished for this period, though it does not cease entirely. Likewise, the volume of family correspondence is decreased, but there are occasional letters from relatives in Cedar Spring, S.C., Georgia, and Texas, and from family serving in the 28th Texas Cavalry Regiment and 34th North Carolina Infantry Regiment, Company G.
1866-1870 Papers, 1866-1870, include family and personal letters with news of children at school, settlement of estates, and the sale of Cornucopia. There also are many business letters relating to investments; the cotton market, per J. D. Aiken and Company of Charleston, S.C.; the development of property in Statesville, N.C.; the condition of various banks, especially with regard to the banks' wartime circulation; Graniteville Manufacturing Company; railroads, including Mississippi Central Railroad and the Columbia and Hamburg Railroad; and the Southern Famine Relief Commission operating in York District. Both family and business correspondence contain a great deal of discussion about the system of freed labor; race relations, including miscegenation, jury composition, and the Ku Klux Klan; Reconstruction politics; and social and economic conditions.
1871-1873, 1884 Papers are scant and rather miscellaneous correspondence.
Folder 1a

Original finding aid #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 1a

Includes detailed chronological analysis of series 1 and 2 and an index of selected proper names. There are genealogical charts and additional biographical information is embedded in series descriptions.

Folder 1b

1797-1800 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 1b

Folder 2

1801-1808 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 2

Folder 3

1809-1818 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 3

Folder 4

1820-1829 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 4

Folder 5

1830 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 5

Folder 6

1831 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 6

Folder 7

1832-1834 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 7

Folder 8

1835 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 8

Folder 9-10

Folder 9

Folder 10

1836 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 9-10

Folder 11-12

Folder 11

Folder 12

1837 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 11-12

Folder 13-14

Folder 13

Folder 14

1838 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 13-14

Folder 15-16

Folder 15

Folder 16

1839 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 15-16

Folder 17

1840 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 17

Folder 18

1841 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 18

Folder 19-21

Folder 19

Folder 20

Folder 21

1842 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 19-21

Folder 22-23

Folder 22

Folder 23

1843 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 22-23

Folder 24

1844 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 24

Folder 25-30

Folder 25

Folder 26

Folder 27

Folder 28

Folder 29

Folder 30

1845 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 25-30

Folder 31-40

Folder 31

Folder 32

Folder 33

Folder 34

Folder 35

Folder 36

Folder 37

Folder 38

Folder 39

Folder 40

1846 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 31-40

Folder 41-48

Folder 41

Folder 42

Folder 43

Folder 44

Folder 45

Folder 46

Folder 47

Folder 48

1847 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 41-48

Folder 49-56

Folder 49

Folder 50

Folder 51

Folder 52

Folder 53

Folder 54

Folder 55

Folder 56

1848 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 49-56

Folder 57-65

Folder 57

Folder 58

Folder 59

Folder 60

Folder 61

Folder 62

Folder 63

Folder 64

Folder 65

1849 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 57-65

Folder 66-69

Folder 66

Folder 67

Folder 68

Folder 69

1850 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 66-69

Folder 70-73

Folder 70

Folder 71

Folder 72

Folder 73

1851 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 70-73

Folder 74-79

Folder 74

Folder 75

Folder 76

Folder 77

Folder 78

Folder 79

1852 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 74-79

Folder 80-85

Folder 80

Folder 81

Folder 82

Folder 83

Folder 84

Folder 85

1853 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 80-85

Folder 86-90

Folder 86

Folder 87

Folder 88

Folder 89

Folder 90

1854 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 86-90

Folder 91-95

Folder 91

Folder 92

Folder 93

Folder 94

Folder 95

1855 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 91-95

Folder 96-99

Folder 96

Folder 97

Folder 98

Folder 99

1856 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 96-99

Folder 100-102

Folder 100

Folder 101

Folder 102

1857 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 100-102

Folder 103-106

Folder 103

Folder 104

Folder 105

Folder 106

1858 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 103-106

Folder 107-110

Folder 107

Folder 108

Folder 109

Folder 110

1859 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 107-110

Folder 111-115

Folder 111

Folder 112

Folder 113

Folder 114

Folder 115

1860 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 111-115

Folder 116-120

Folder 116

Folder 117

Folder 118

Folder 119

Folder 120

1861 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 116-120

Folder 121-128

Folder 121

Folder 122

Folder 123

Folder 124

Folder 125

Folder 126

Folder 127

Folder 128

1862 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 121-128

Folder 129-134

Folder 129

Folder 130

Folder 131

Folder 132

Folder 133

Folder 134

1863 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 129-134

Folder 135-143

Folder 135

Folder 136

Folder 137

Folder 138

Folder 139

Folder 140

Folder 141

Folder 142

Folder 143

1864 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 135-143

Folder 144-150

Folder 144

Folder 145

Folder 146

Folder 147

Folder 148

Folder 149

Folder 150

1865 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 144-150

Folder 151

1861-1865: Undated #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 151

Folder 152-160

Folder 152

Folder 153

Folder 154

Folder 155

Folder 156

Folder 157

Folder 158

Folder 159

Folder 160

1866 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 152-160

Folder 161-170

Folder 161

Folder 162

Folder 163

Folder 164

Folder 165

Folder 166

Folder 167

Folder 168

Folder 169

Folder 170

1867 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 161-170

Folder 171-182

Folder 171

Folder 172

Folder 173

Folder 174

Folder 175

Folder 176

Folder 177

Folder 178

Folder 179

Folder 180

Folder 181

Folder 182

1868 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 171-182

Folder 183-192

Folder 183

Folder 184

Folder 185

Folder 186

Folder 187

Folder 188

Folder 189

Folder 190

Folder 191

Folder 192

1869 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 183-192

Folder 193-204

Folder 193

Folder 194

Folder 195

Folder 196

Folder 197

Folder 198

Folder 199

Folder 200

Folder 201

Folder 202

Folder 203

Folder 204

1870 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 193-204

Folder 205

1871-1873, 1884 #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 205

Folder 206-208

Folder 206

Folder 207

Folder 208

Undated #04121, Series: "1. Correspondence, 1797-1873, 1884, and undated." Folder 206-208

Includes a brief history of Springfield Plantation

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expand/collapse Expand/collapse Series 2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated.

About 1,300 items.

Arrangement: chronological.

Largely legal and financial papers. Included here are various receipts from and accounts with merchants; receipts for the sale of cotton; bills of sale for slaves; tax receipts; tuition receipts; bills for the services of midwives and physicians; bills for work done on houses and barns; receipts for newspaper subscriptions; post office accounts; marriage agreements; wills; property valuations and inventories; lists of debts due; land surveys and plats, including a few pertaining to the transfer of Native American land; lists of livestock exhibited; and lists of monetary gifts given to slaves at Christmas. Also included are papers relating to estate settlements for William Pettus, Frederick Dinkins, David Spratt, Eli Springs, Richard Springs, and Henry Kimbrell; the purchase of various stocks and bonds, chiefly those of the Columbia and South Carolina Railroad; proceedings of various railroad meetings and circulars (some printed); and the condition of various banks. Confederate military and administrative papers document mustering of troops in the Fort Mill, S.C., area in 1861; food supplies and provisions for South Carolina troops, including Forrest's Cavalry Brigade, and the 8th Texas Cavalry (Texas Rangers); orders issued from the Quartermaster's Office, Armstrong's Division; and the work of the Soldier's Relief Board.

Folder 209

1772-1806 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 209

Folder 210

1807-1816 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 210

Folder 211

1817 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 211

Folder 212

1818 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 212

Folder 213

1819-1825 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 213

Folder 214

1826-1829 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 214

Folder 215

1830-1832 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 215

Folder 216-217

Folder 216

Folder 217

1833 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 216-217

Folder 218-219

Folder 218

Folder 219

1834 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 218-219

Folder 220

1835 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 220

Folder 221

1836 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 221

Folder 222

1837 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 222

Folder 223

1838 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 223

Folder 224-225

Folder 224

Folder 225

1839 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 224-225

Folder 226

1840 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 226

Folder 227-228

Folder 227

Folder 228

1841 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 227-228

Folder 229

1842 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 229

Folder 230

1843 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 230

Folder 231

1844 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 231

Folder 232

1845 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 232

Folder 233

1846 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 233

Folder 234

1847 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 234

Folder 235-236

Folder 235

Folder 236

1848 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 235-236

Folder 237-238

Folder 237

Folder 238

1849 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 237-238

Folder 239

1850 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 239

Folder 240

1851 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 240

Folder 241

1852 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 241

Folder 242

1853 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 242

Folder 243

1854 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 243

Folder 244

1855 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 244

Folder 245-248

Folder 245

Folder 246

Folder 247

Folder 248

1856 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 245-248

Folder 249

1858 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 249

Folder 250

1859 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 250

Folder 251

1860 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 251

Folder 252

1861 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 252

Folder 253-254

Folder 253

Folder 254

1862 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 253-254

Folder 255

1863-1864 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 255

Folder 256-257

Folder 256

Folder 257

1865 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 256-257

Folder 258

1866-1867 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 258

Folder 259

1868-1870 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 259

Folder 260

1871-1924 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 260

Folder 261-262

Folder 261

Folder 262

Undated #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 261-262

Folder 263

United States documents, 1850, 1853, 1858 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 263

Includes a "Lecture on Texas"

Folder 264

United States documents, 1859-1860 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 264

Folder 265

Confederate documents, 1862 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 265

Folder 266-267

Folder 266

Folder 267

Confederate documents, 1863 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 266-267

Folder 268-270

Folder 268

Folder 269

Folder 270

Confederate documents, 1864 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 268-270

Folder 271

Confederate documents, undated #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 271

Folder 272

South Carolina Senate documents, 1865 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 272

Folder 273

South Carolina House documents, 1865 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 273

Folder 274

South Carolina documents, 1865 #04121, Series: "2. Other papers, 1772-1924, and undated." Folder 274

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Processing Information

Processed by: Susan Ballinger, 1978, and Roslyn Holdzkom, 1991

Encoded by: Nancy Kaiser, November 2005

Funding from the Watson-Brown Foundation, Inc., supported the encoding of this finding aid.

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