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Death Mask of Napoleon Bonaparte "Capture at Fort Fisher" (detail), from the Civil War Image Portfolio

North Carolina Collection: Online Exhibits

A Right to Speak and to Hear: Academic Freedom and Free Expression at UNC

An exploration of events that tested the University's commitment to academic freedom and free expression from the 19th Century to the 21st. "A Right to Speak and to Hear" is a digital version of an exhibit that appeared in the North Carolina Collection Gallery from February 21 to June 2, 2013.

North Carolina Postcards

This online collection contains a wide-ranging selection of postcards depicting scenes from all over North Carolina throughout the twentieth century.

The North Carolina Election of 1898

This primary source toolkit introduces students and researchers to one of the most significant elections in North Carolina history. This site includes many original sources, including controversial and influential editorial cartoons from the News and Observer.

The Evolution Controversy in North Carolina in the 1920s

This online exhibit examines the controversy over the teaching of evolution in North Carolina public schools and universities in the 1920s. Focused primarily on the events around the 1925 "Poole Bill," the website contains an introduction, timeline, and key primary sources introducing the topic.

Civil War Image Portfolio

Drawn from the rich resources of the North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, the Civil War Image Portfolio contains photographs and engravings documenting battles and military and civilian life during the Civil War in North Carolina.

Ah Lahk Ike, campaign button, 1952 Campaign button, 1952, from Campaigns and Causes

Picturing the New World: The Hand-Colored De Bry Engravings of 1590

This online exhibit displays images from a rare, hand-colored 1590 volume in the North Carolina Collection containing the earliest published illustrations of North Carolina.

What's In a Name? Why We're All Called Tar Heels

Historian William S. Powell delves into the origins of North Carolinians' unique nickname.

Rufus Morgan Stereographs

This site displays many of the stereographs taken by Rufus Morgan, a photographer active in North Carolina in the nineteenth century.

Variety Vacationland

This online exhibit displays 29 promotional postcards published by the North Carolina Division of State Advertising in 1939.

Talk Like a Tar Heel

Learn to talk like a native North Carolinian -- listen to recordings of place names and read a guide to pronunciations.

Eng & Chang Bunker, the "Original" Siamese Twins

The conjoined twins Eng & Chang Bunker, who were known worldwide in the nineteenth century, spent most of their later years in Wilkes County, N.C. This brief discussion of their lives is drawn from a permanent exhibit in the North Carolina Collection Gallery.

Campaigns and Causes: Political Memorabilia in North Carolina

This online exhibit showcases a selection of campaign buttons and other materials from the North Carolina Collection Gallery's holdings of political memorabilia.

Tar Heel Ink

"Tar Heel Ink" presents a selection of student publications from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1844-2005. Based on an exhibit in the North Carolina Collection Gallery.

Train Near Old Fort "Train Near Old Fort" (detail), from Rufus Morgan Stereographs

Carolina Quotables

A selection of quotations -- good and bad -- about the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Death Mask of Napoleon Bonaparte

A plaster copy of the death mask of Napoleon Bonaparte was given to UNC in 1894, and is now held in the North Carolina Collection Gallery.

Carolina Elephant Token

This site discusses the curious and often confusing history of the 1694 Carolina Elephant token.

Gladys Hall Coates University History Lecture Series

The full text of these annual lectures on University History is available on this site. Topics include student writings and William Richardson Davie.

Preliminary Map Showing Location of Principal Gold Deposits in North Carolina

From the records of the state Geological Survey. [Raleigh]: N.C. Geological Survey, 1896. (Baltimore, Md. : Lith. by A. Hoen & Co.). NCC call number Cm912g G618n.