Tobacco Bag Stringing
Carrie Wyatt

WYATT, MISS CARRIE; single, lives with sister; age 20 years; resides in Wilkes County, N.C.

INCOME: None.

HOME CONDITIONS: Mother dead ten years and father about three months, leaving her and a sister with a fifteen-months old baby. They have a two-room house and a small patch of ground which is used as a garden. The house is very badly constructed, the walls being only boards nailed to the upright rafters and having many wide cracks in them, which makes it very hard to keep warm in winter. The only furniture is two beds, a couple of chairs, a small table and dresser. Her sister's husband has left with nothing. They both do the gardening and supply themselves with vegetables. They have no electricity, running water or inside toilet facilities. Cooking is done by wood stove, as is the heating. All the wood is gathered form the forests. Water is gotten from the creek. She earns about $10.00 a month on bags and it all goes for food and personal necessities, clothes being made at home out of bag cloth and other which is given her. She and her sister say they enjoy sitting down after the housework is done and stringing the bags. If the bags are taken away they will go hundry [sic], she says, because she has been unable to find work of any kind.

[Source: "Tobacco Bag Stringing Operations in North Carolina and Virginia." Richmond, Va.: 1939. North Carolina Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.]