Pamela Grundy (interviewer):
Did people talk when you were in high school, did the students talk among themselves at all about integration or anything like that? Or was that simply not really an issue?

William Hamlin:
Well, yes, we did talk about it. And I think our dialogue was basically centered around the fact that we were just as good as any other students at Charlotte-Mecklenberg if we were given the opportunity to really compete. There was always an itching that we wanted the opportunity to meet our counterparts, whether it be in academics or sports or whatever, head to head, to sort of see who was best. And you know, I guess that was the only way that we felt that we could get some parity. You had to have a competitive- you had to have an event that would generate an outcome as to who is the best now. So, there was a lot of talk about, "Boy, I sure would like to see us sing at a competition that involved them. I sure would like to see them debate with us. I sure would like to see them compete with us athletically," or whatever it was. That was basically the dialogue we picked up. We just wanted the opportunity to show that we were as good as we knew we were.

Pamela Grundy (interviewer):
Did that opportunity ever come around at all, or the possibility of that, when you were in school?

William Hamlin:
No, not during the time that I was in school. No, it didn't.

- William Hamlin, West Charlotte High School, Class of 1963

Interview with William Hamlin by Pamela Grundy, May 29, 1998, Interview K-0169, in the Southern Oral History Collection #4007, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Full text of interview.