Madge Hopkins:
I became aware of school desegregation and the issue when I was at Northwest and Dorothy Counts began integrating the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, and we all talked about it and everybody knew about it.

Pamela Grundy (interviewer):
When you say you all talked about it, what did you talk about? What did you all say about it?

Madge Hopkins:
What was going on and what was happening to her. You overheard teachers talking. Because I'm sure - I think Dorothy had been through Northwest and so we were all aware of that.

Pamela Grundy (interviewer):
Right. Because her parents worked at Smith, I believe.

Madge Hopkins:
Hm-hm. Yeah. And at one time, and we probably, yeah, we talked about it at church. Her father at one time had been, I don't think he . . . he had been a supply - I remember seeing her because her father had been a guest minister or supply minister at my church. Which is a Presbyterian Church, same church I still attend, and he was a Presbyterian minister. And I remember seeing her and her family so I could identify with her although she wasn't at Northwest.

Pamela Grundy (interviewer):
What were you thinking? Did that seem - I guess what were your feelings about that and maybe even related to yourself and this situation, changing situation.

Madge Hopkins:
I didn't relate to it in terms of myself, in terms of my attending a school other than Northwest, because at that time I was at Northwest. I thought she was brave and. . .not something that I wanted to do, didn't have any desire to do that.

- Madge Hopkins, West Charlotte High School, Class of 1961

Interview with Madge Hopkins by Pamela Grundy, October 17, 2000, Interview K-0481, in the Southern Oral History Program Collection #4007, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Full text of interview.