The Story: New Democrat

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I think the action of Governor Wallace is saying that the politics have raised. The politics that we knew during the 50s and 60s is gone. If it's not gone completely, it's on its deathbed. I think that's what it symbolizes.

John Lewis


"They can count"
- John Lewis

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Selma to Montgomery

While the majority of black voters are voting for democratic candidates, white southern voters have voted two to one for Republicans over Democrats in presidential elections since 1984 (Bullock 14). Therefore, with the majority of white southerners voting Republican, the success of Democratic campaigns depends on strong voter turnout among African Americans. As a result, Democratic candidates are often more attuned to the issues affecting the black community and may alter their message to address these issues more frequently than many of their political counterparts (Bullock 16).

"The politics have raised"
- John Lewis

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For example, southern Democrat George Wallace drastically changed his campaign strategy between the 1968 and 1972 presidential elections. In the 1968 election, Wallace ran as the American Independent Party candidate. Throughout the campaign, he accused both his opponents, Democrat Hubert Humphrey and Republican Richard Nixon, of planning to radically desegregate the South. Wallace’s segregationist strategy won him five southern states (Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, and Mississippi) and nearly ten million popular votes. In the 1972 primaries, Wallace announced his Democratic candidacy and asserted that he was no longer a segregationist. However, his 1972 campaign would be disrupted when on May 15th he was shot and paralyzed by a mentally unstable man wishing to gain fame as a political assassin.