George LeMaistre:
There was a great deal more movement toward integration than you would infer from the fact it was kept out of the political races.
Interviewer:
It was beneath the surface.
George LeMaistre:
Yeah, it was under the surface more than anything else.
Interviewer:
But you had the FEPC [Fair Employment Practices Committee] during World War II that a—then it was a very controversial issue after the war.
George LeMaistre:
And if you look through the record, and the speeches that were made by the candidates from the South, almost without exception they found some reason to be against FEPC--an unwarranted interference with free enterprise, keeping people from making rightful business decisions that they ought to be entitled to, whatever the argument. Most of the time it was a specious argument of some kind, but they never said, "I'm against it because it helps the blacks." There was never anyone of them that I know of who said, "I'm just for a white democracy."

- George LeMaistre, former professor of law and chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

Interview with George LeMaistre by Allen Going, April 29, 1985, Interview A-0358, in the Southern Oral History Program Collection #4007, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
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