Herman Talmadge:
'Course, the route that we should have gone, when they passed the Fourteenth Amendment, that really was the basis of all these so-called rights and still is. At that time, we ought not to have ever had segregated schools, segregation in the South. Once you adopt a pattern and a mold of conduct with all of the laws involved, including your Constitution, and it's been in being for over a hundred years, people don't change their habits.
Interviewer:
They really don't. I've done some reading, too, back in that period of time, and the laws really came into place between about 1877 and the turn of the century.
Herman Talmadge:
Right. As a matter of fact, we didn't have the white primary law in Georgia, I don't think, until about 1917.
Interviewer:
Yeah, it was after the turn of the century.
Herman Talmadge:
Called Neill Primary Act.
Interviewer:
Right.

- Herman Talmadge, Georgia's governor from 1948 to 1955 and senator from 1957 to 1981

Interview with Herman Talmadge by John Egerton, November 8, 1990, Interview A-0347, in the Southern Oral History Program Collection #4007, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Click here to access the full interview.