Jacqueline Hall:
How did you get this sense that the men in SCLC, Dr. King and Abernathy and the other men, didn't value women's work or want to work with them on a basis of equality? How was that manifested?

Septima Poinsette Clark:
Well, I felt that usually, when they had executive meetings, if we had anything to say, maybe we could get to say it at the end of the session, but we never were able to put ourselves on the agenda to speak to the group.

Jacqueline Hall:
Did you try?

Septima Poinsette Clark:
I did. I wanted to tell them about. . . . Well, I sent him two or three letters, and the last letter-I wish he'd listened to me-I not only spoke to him, but I spoke to one or two of the other persons around, and I told them about him going, being the head of everything. I just felt that he had disciples in Memphis and in some parts of Georgia, Albany, and those people could go and lead a march. He didn't have to lead them all. And so he read the letter to the executive group, and there was a secretary sitting there, two other women, and I had spoken to them, too. But not a one of them said one word. And a young man who was in our office, but not a one of them supported me in that at all.

- Septima Poinsette Clark, educator and civil rights activist

Interview with Septima Poinsette Clark by Jacqueline Hall, July 25, 1976, Interview G-0016, in the Southern Oral History Program Collection #4007, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
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