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UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries Catalog

What is the UNC-Chapel Libraries Catalog?

Search Types

Linguistic Features

What is the UNC-CH Libraries Catalog?
Use the catalog to search for materials owned by UNC-Chapel Hill libraries. Search for books, journals, government documents, magazines, newspapers, DVDs, videos, music CDs , etc. Identify which library owns the materials that you need or find links to available electronic journals and electronic books.

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Title Search
If you know the title of the material you want to find, type all or part of the title, starting at the beginning. Be sure to omit initial articles like "The", "An", and "A". If you are unsure of the title, try a Keyword search.

Search Example:

To find the book A Hacker Manifesto,
1. select Title from the list of search options on the left (it is the default search on the main library catalog page);
2. type as much of the beginning of the title as is likely to make the search close to unique, omitting the initial article: hacker mani;
3. then click the Search button.

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Journal Title Search
Search for any print Journal title, along with many (but not all) Journal titles owned in electronic format.

Search Example:

To find the Journal with the title Journal of Personality and Social Psychology,
1. select Journal Title from the list of search options on the left;
2. type as much of the beginning of the title as is likely to make the search close to unique: journal of personality and social p;
3. then click Search button.

From the record of this journal you can:

1. Click on Full text via UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries Web to see online coverage (in this case Holdings are1985 - present) and connect to the online journal.
2. Click on Latest Received to see recently received print issues.
3. Find the library Location that has the Journal (in this case Davis Library).
4. Find the Call No needed to locate bound volumes (in this case HM251 .J56). Some campus libraries alphabetize journals by title and do not use call numbers.

Note: Use spelled out form of title. Look up the full form of a title abbreviation.

Remember, not all electronic Journal titles are in the catalog. To check for additional electronic access to Journal titles use the E-Journals Search.

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Author Search
Search for an author, illustrator, artist or organization. For a person, type the last name first, followed by the first name or initial, if known. For an organization, type the full or partial name of the organization. You can ignore punctuation and capitalization.

Person Search Example:

To find works by the author Jose Saramago, 1. select Author from the list of search options on the left; 2. type the last name, followed by as much of the beginning of the first name as is likely to make the search close to unique: saramago j; 3. then click the Search button.

Organization Search Example:

To find works by authored by the North Carolina Academy of Trial Lawyers,
1. select Author from the list of search options on the left;
2. type as much of the organization's name as is likely to make the search close to unique: North Carolina academy of trial;
3. then click the Search button.

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Keyword Search
Choose the Keyword Search to search for words or phrases anywhere in the record of an item. You may enter a single word, such as impressionism, or a phrase, such as fluid mechanics. If you enter a phrase, the phrase will be searched exactly as you enter it.

You can restrict a word or a phrase to appear only in specific fields by adding qualifiers. For example:

You can combine words or phrases using the operators and, or, and not. For example:

You can combine several operators in a single statement. For example:

You can also broaden your Keyword Search by using truncation symbols.

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Subject Headings Search
Subject Headings help you find items about a topic even if the title of the item does not use words that clearly describe what it is about.

For example:

A keyword search for Rock Music History finds the book Girls Rock! Fifty Years of Women Making Music because a library cataloger added the Subject Heading, Rock Music History and Criticism. One way to do a subject search is to click on a subject heading found towards the bottom of a catalog record.

Search for Subject Headings by selecting one of two indexes. Arts & Sciences and Law Library catalogers use Library of Congress (LC) Subject Headings. Health Sciences Library cataloguers use MedicalSubject Headings (MeSH).

For example:

Find materials about Pollution
1. Select Subject Headings from the list of search options on the left
2. Select LC Subject Heading button
3. Type Pollution in the Search box
4. Click Search button
5. Click Pollution to browse items with that LC Subject Heading OR
6. Click on Pollution - 36 Related LC Subjects to find a related topic OR
7. Browse the list to click on a narrower topic: Pollution - Economic Aspects

Find materials about Bipolar Disorder
1. Select Subject Headings from the list of search options on the left
2. Select Medical Subject Heading button
3. Type Bipolar Disorder in the Search box
4. Click Search button
5. Click Bipolar Disorder to browse items with that MeSH Subject Heading OR
6. Browse the list to click on a narrower topic: Bipolar Disorder Drug Therapy

Note: To search the name of a person, organization or place as a subject you must search by Library of Congress Subject Heading.

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Call Numbers Search
Search for items by the number used to locate the item on the library shelf. Type all or only part of a call number.

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ISBN / ISSN and Other Numbers Search
Search by standard numbers such as:

ISBN (International Standard Book Number)
ISSN (International Standard Serial Number)
WorldCat (OCLC) number
Geographic classification code
GPO (Government Printing Office) number
ISRC (International Standard Recording Code) number
Library of Congress control number
Publisher number
STRN (Standard Technical Report Number)
and other numbers

1. Select ISBN / ISSN & Others from the list of search options on the left
2. Select a number category
3. For ISBN, ISSN, and WorldCat (OCLC) number searches, type the number (with or without hyphens). For other number searches, exact punctuation and spacing may be important. Try other combinations if the first search fails, or ask a librarian.
4. Click Search button

Search Examples:
ISBN 0807829218
ISSN 00377732
WorldCat 51763989
Publisher 6753 Henmar Press [or just] 6753
GPO 544
Tech report epa 100-b-98-001 [or] epa 100 b 98 001 [or] epa100b098001<

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Series Search
Search for materials published and/or cataloged as separate parts of a series or set

Search Example:
1. Select Series from the list of search options on the left
2. Type as much of the beginning of the title as is likely to make the search close to unique:

3. Click Search button

Please note that this search option does not include most journals, newspapers, and other periodicals. To find these materials, please choose a different Title search option from the Search options list.

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Punctuation and Symbols
As a general rule, punctuation can be left out when entering searches in the catalog. However, the punctuation mark must be replaced with a space.

Example:
"u.s. news" is treated the same as "u s news," but not "us news." The use of punctuation depends on the type of search being done.

In Advanced Search:

1. Generally omit punctuation marks and replace them with a space. The slash (/) and the hyphen (-) may be included or replaced with a space.
Example:
"pre schoolers" and "pre-schoolers" get the same results while "preschoolers" will retrieve different records.
An exception is the apostrophe ('), which is removed and not substituted with a space.
Example:
"can't" must be searched as "cant"
2. The plus sign (+) may be searched, for example "a+" will retrieve several records, including the title Mike Meyers' A+ Guide to Operating Systems.
3. The pound sign (#) should not be used, since it causes keyword searches to fail.
4. The ampersand (&) is automatically replaced with the spelled-out English word "and."
Example:
"comedy & tragedy" is searched as "comedy and tragedy"

In Title, Author, Subject, Call Number, and Additional Number Searches

1. Generally omit punctuation marks and replace them with a space in these searches.
An exception is the apostrophe ('), which is removed and not substituted with a space. Example:
"o'donnells" can also be searched as "odonnells"
A second exception is the ampersand (&) which should not be used in foreign-language titles, as it is automatically replaced with the spelled-out English word "and."
2. A few symbols are indexed and can be included in searches. They include the pound sign (#), the plus sign (+) and the slash (/).

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Diacritics and Special Characters

As a general rule:

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