How to Proceed: Additions

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Back to [[XML at UNC: Additions]]
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Separately maintained additions are real time savers that work very well provided that the material in these additions is clearly described, its location within the collection identified, and access points for the new material provided when necessary.  
 
Separately maintained additions are real time savers that work very well provided that the material in these additions is clearly described, its location within the collection identified, and access points for the new material provided when necessary.  
  
If the finding aid for the collection to which you are adding has already been encoded in EAD, Addition(s) becomes a new series and each separate addition is a subseries under it. The abstract, administrative information, online catalog terms, scope and content note, and series list also are updated as appropriate. See the addition section of the EAD manual for step by step instructions
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If the finding aid for the collection to which you are adding has already been encoded in EAD, Addition(s) becomes a new series and each separate addition is a subseries under it. The abstract, administrative information, online catalog terms, scope and content note, and series list also are updated as appropriate.  
  
 
Additions typically are named by when they were received at the repository, not by when you are adding the material to the collection. In the example below, you'll note that the addition is referred to as the Addition of March 2008, meaning that the photograph was given to us in March 2008.
 
Additions typically are named by when they were received at the repository, not by when you are adding the material to the collection. In the example below, you'll note that the addition is referred to as the Addition of March 2008, meaning that the photograph was given to us in March 2008.
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Making additions to collections that have been microfilmed can be a complicated matter. The best plan of attack is to consult with your supervising archivist.
 
Making additions to collections that have been microfilmed can be a complicated matter. The best plan of attack is to consult with your supervising archivist.
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==Statement for Collections With Unprocessed Additions==
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The following statement should go in the '''Access Restrictions''' element for collections having unprocessed additions:
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''This collection contains additional materials that are not processed and are currently not available to researchers. For information about access to these materials, contact Research and Instructional Services staff. Please be advised that preparing unprocessed materials for access can be a lengthy process.''
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[[Category:How to Proceed]]

Latest revision as of 09:46, 10 January 2011

Back to XML at UNC: Additions

Back to How to Proceed Table of Contents

NAVIGATION
1. Introduction
2. Preparing to Process
3. Arranging
4. Describing
5. Housing and Preserving
6. Finishing the Job

Additions to existing collections come in many shapes and sizes. It can be the case that an addition consists of materials that can be dropped into appropriate places in an already established arrangement with little or no impact on the description. An addition of this type sometimes requires revision of several lines of the finding aid and/or some slight additional information. Possible changes include revision of the provenance/acquisitions information statement, the number of items or range of dates; slight revision of the abstract, online catalog terms, and/or series description(s); insertion of new folders in the list of existing folders. Often these kinds of revisions change so little in terms of description that it is not necessary to revise the existing MARC record.

For assistance in coding additions in your EAD finding aid see XML at UNC: Additions

If an addition contains materials that will significantly alter the description of the collection, we typically treat the new material as a separately maintained addition (read on).

Contents

Separately Maintained Additions

Separately maintained additions are real time savers that work very well provided that the material in these additions is clearly described, its location within the collection identified, and access points for the new material provided when necessary.

If the finding aid for the collection to which you are adding has already been encoded in EAD, Addition(s) becomes a new series and each separate addition is a subseries under it. The abstract, administrative information, online catalog terms, scope and content note, and series list also are updated as appropriate.

Additions typically are named by when they were received at the repository, not by when you are adding the material to the collection. In the example below, you'll note that the addition is referred to as the Addition of March 2008, meaning that the photograph was given to us in March 2008.

Typically, you will append your description of the addition to the end of the abstract and scope and content note as in the example below. Begin your sentence with "The Addition of." Capitalize the word Addition.

Example of a finding aid with a separately maintained addition:

William Borden Cobb Papers, 1908-1934

Collection Number 5266

Extent

Items: About 200

Linear Feet: 0.5

Abstract: William Borden Cobb of Goldsboro, N.C., served a sergeant in the Chemical Warfare Services section of the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I. Cobb was stationed in La Pallice and Saint Sulpice, France. When the war ended, he attended the American Expeditionary Forces University in Beune, France. Letters from William Borden Cobb to his parents William H. and Georgia Borden Cobb and to his brother Donnell B. Cobb provide detailed descriptions of military life in France away from the front including activities in Chemical Warfare Service camps, travels around France especially to Bordeaux and Paris, and experiences at the American Expeditionary Forces University in Beune. A few letters contain enclosures such as Cobb's records of military promotion and ephemera. There is also a very small amount of correspondence from Cobb and Borden family members. The Addition of March 2008 consists of a 1918 photographic portrait of William Borden Cobb in military uniform.

Administrative Information

Acquisitions Information Received from John C. Cobb of Goldsboro, N.C., in January 2006 (Acc. 100300) and in March 2008 (Acc. 100876).

Processing Information Processed by: Jackie Dean, April 2006 Encoded by: Jackie Dean, April 2006 Revisions: Finding aid updated in June 2008 by John Blythe.

Biographical Note William Borden Cobb served a sergeant in the Chemical Warfare Services section of the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I. Cobb was stationed in La Pallice and Saint Sulpice, France. When the war ended, he attended the American Expeditionary Forces University in Beune, France. Cobb was born 10 September 1894 in Goldsboro, N.C., and was graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1916. William H. Cobb Jr. and Georgia Borden Cobb were his parents, Dr. Donnell B. Cobb of Goldsboro was his brother, and Collier Cobb of Chapel Hill, N.C., was his uncle.

Scope and Content Note Letters from William Borden Cobb of Goldsboro, N.C., to his parents William H. Cobb and Georgia Borden Cobb and to his brother Donnell B. Cobb provide detailed descriptions of military life in France away from the front including activities in Chemical Warfare Service camps, travel in France especially to Bordeaux and Paris, and experiences at the American Expeditionary Forces University. A few letters contain enclosures such as Cobb's records of military promotion and ephemera. There is also a very small amount of correspondence from Cobb and Borden family members. The Addition of March 2008 consists of a 1918 photographic portrait of William Borden Cobb in military uniform.

Arrangement of Collection

  • Letters from William Borden Cobb and other correspondence, 1919-1934
  • Addition of March 2008

Items Separated

  • Photograph (P-5266/1)

Contents List

Letters from William Borden Cobb and other correspondence, 1919-1934. About 200 items.

  • Folder 1-6 Letters to William H. Cobb Jr. and Georgia Borden Cobb, 1918-1919
  • Folder 7 Letter to William H. Cobb Jr. and Georgia Borden Cobb, 1929
  • Folder 8 Letters to Donnell B. Cobb, July 1918-March 1919

Addition of March 2008 (Acc. 100876)

  • Image P-5266/1 Photographic portrait of William Borden Cobb, 1918

Separately Maintained Additions with Series

In some cases you will have series in your addition. Unlike series and subseries in original deposits, those in additions typically do not receive numbers. In place of the number, we include the name of the addition, i.e. Addition of April 2003: Correspondence.

In days past, if we had a series in our addition that duplicated a series in the original deposit, we would give the addition's series the same number. We gave up this practice because it proved confusing to navigate finding aids with duplicate series numbers on the web.

Arrangements can be complicated and might not always work with these rules. See your supervising archivist for help with describing your series arrangement as a separately maintained addition.

The container list below is an example of a separately maintained addition with series. The latest addition described here does not include series.

Contents List

1.	Correspondence and related materials
Folder 1	Correspondence, 1901-1910
Folder 2	Correspondence, 1911-1920
		Folder 3	Correspondence, 1921-1945


2.	Diaries
Folder 4	Diary ,1925
Folder 5	Diary, 1942


Addition of March 2008 (Acc. 10452)

Addition of March 2008: Correspondence
	Folder 6	Correspondence, 1950s
	Folder 7	Correspondence, 1960s
	Folder 8	Correspondence, 1970s

Addition of March 2008: Diaries
	Folder 9	Diary, 1950
	Folder 10	Diary, 1951

Addition of March 2008: Financial Records

	Folder 11	Account book, 1901
	Folder 12 	Account book, 1902-1903


Addition of February 2009 (Acc. 200135)

	Folder 13	Account book, 1905
	P-6001/1	Photograph of Hetty Holdzkom, age 3

Alerting Researchers to Additions

With separately maintained additions, it's good practice to warn researchers that they will need to look in the collection's additions to find all the materials that they need. Include a note indicating this as the last paragraph of your scope and content note.

Example of scope content note alerting researchers about additions:

These papers consist chiefly of family letters from the 1790s through the early 1860s. Correspondence of the family with outsiders had been almost entirely excluded from the collection, but family letters were deliberately preserved as a "family record" (see Ellen Mordecai's letters of October-November 1854). The Addition of January 2007 includes personal letters between family members; 1816 letters by Maria Edgeworth and Richard Lovell Edgeworth responding to Rachel Mordecai Lazarus's letter concerning Edgeworth's literary treatment of Jews; and reminiscences, song lyrics, and fragements. The Addition of September 2007 includes letters written to and by Mordecai family members, 1865 and 1916-1917, and one poem dated 1945. The Addition of December 2007 contains the three-volume "A Memoir of Maria Edgeworth with a Selection from Her Letters by the late Mrs. Edgeworth" (unpublished) with accompanying notes tipped in.

Additions received after 1979 have not been integrated into the original deposits. Researchers should always check additions to be sure they have identified all files of interest to them

Finishing the Finding Aid with Additions

There are a few extra steps involved in finishing a finding aid with additions. It's important that we indicate what content has changed in this new version, so the departmental cataloger can update the collection's MARC record. Once you have finished adding your information to the finding aid, you will print out the finding aid and annotate your changes. For additions to long collections, there is no need to print out the pages that represent the original deposit if nothing has been changed here. You can print just the parts that have changed.

Please circle or otherwise annotate the following items on the printed copy. If any of the items in the list below have not changed as a result of your addition, please indicate this by writing "No Change" by the item.

  • Collection dates
  • Extent
  • Accessions Info/Provenance
  • Processing Information
  • Abstract
  • Subject headings
  • Biographical/Historical Note
  • Scope and Content Note
  • Organization of Collection
  • Items Separated: here indicate specifically what you have changed
  • Indicate what parts in the container list you have added.

REMEMBER there are sections in the EAD header that must be updated as well. See XML at UNC: Additions for specific instructions for this.

Labeling Boxes and Folders for Additions

See Boxes and Folders for Additions in the Housing and Preserving section of How to Proceed.

Additions to Collections That Have Been Microfilmed

Be sensitive to researcher needs when processing additions to collections that have been microfilmed. If the addition is to be physically integrated into the materials that have been microfilmed, make an item list for the control file so that researchers who use the collection on film can easily locate what is not on the film. A number of plantation collections that were filmed by UPA during the 1990s still get additions through donation and purchase. Among these are the Cameron Family Papers, the Lenoir Family Papers, and the Pettigrew Family.

Making additions to collections that have been microfilmed can be a complicated matter. The best plan of attack is to consult with your supervising archivist.

Statement for Collections With Unprocessed Additions

The following statement should go in the Access Restrictions element for collections having unprocessed additions:

This collection contains additional materials that are not processed and are currently not available to researchers. For information about access to these materials, contact Research and Instructional Services staff. Please be advised that preparing unprocessed materials for access can be a lengthy process.

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