Items Separated

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(Separated volumes (SV-))
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<c0x><did><container type="xopaperfolder">XOP-1234/Folder 1-2</container><unittitle>Maps of southern states showing barbeque restaurants</unittitle></did></c0x>
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'''Extra Oversize Paper Folder XOP-1234/Folder 1-2'''
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Maps of southern states showing barbeque restaurants
 
Maps of southern states showing barbeque restaurants
  
 
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<c0x><did><container type="xoimagefolder">XOP-P-1234/Folder 1-5</container><unittitle>Photographs of 1993 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Men's Basketball Team</unittitle></did></c0x>
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<c0x><did><container type="xoimagefolder">XOP-PF-1234/Folder 1-5</container><unittitle>Photographs of 1993 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Men's Basketball Team</unittitle></did></c0x>
 
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Photographs of 1993 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Men's Basketball Team
 
Photographs of 1993 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Men's Basketball Team
  

Revision as of 08:55, 25 March 2011

Back to Main Page

Back to How to Proceed Table of Contents

NAVIGATION
1. Introduction
2. Preparing to Process
3. Arranging
4. Describing
5. Housing and Preserving
6. Finishing the Job

Contents

Items Separated

General information

The Supply Location List will help you find the supplies you will need to house your items properly.

To determine where in the stacks you should store your separated items see Where to Put Away Materials

Numbering items separated

Each item separated receives an item number with the following three parts: a prefix indicating which type of item separated it is, the collection number, and a sequential number.

For example, a photograph could have the number P-4007/1. The P represents "photographs," the 4007 is the collection number, and 1 means it is the first separated photograph. The sequential number for each different type of item separated begins with 1.

See Container Types for a list of the items separated prefixes.

Housing "Z-Style"

Many of our items separated formats are housed "Z-style," which is our way of saying that items from several collections are housed in the same container, a la the Z collections. Z collections are collections that have five or fewer folders and are all housed together in document cases. That way we do not have half-empty document cases scattered through the stacks unnecessarily taking up space. The Z collections and Photograph Z folders are housed in collection number order. The rest of the formats that are housed Z style do not need to be housed in collection number order.

The principle behind housing Z-style is that you find the next available place for your materials in the run of boxes or drawers. Each box or drawer is numbered and this number is recorded in the location database. There will also be a place for you to record your item numbers, usually on the lid of the box or the front of the drawer, as a double-check.

Unlike the three-part item number, the box number or drawer number represents the item's physical location and is recorded in the location database, but not recorded in the finding aid. For example, an audio cassette may have the item number C-2504/3 and be housed in Audiocassette Box 25. Patrons would request the cassette using the number C-2504/3. Research and Instruction staff would check the database and see that that particular cassette can be found in Box 25.

Photograph Zs are housed in order.
Oversize papers and photographs are housed Z-style, but not necessarily in collection number order
The contents of the box are recorded on a label on the box lid.

Pictures in legal-size folders (P-)

Pictures that will fit in legal folders are stored in folders in document cases or records cartons in the same manner as papers. Do not overfill the folders. Overfilling folders with photographs is especially dangerous, since photographic emulsions are easily cracked.

You can describe each individual photograph (containertype="image") or in groups (containertype="imagefolder") in the finding aid.

Photograph folder containing photographs described individually
Photograph folder containing photographs described as a group
If you have five or fewer picture folders, file them with the Photo z run in collection-number order
If you have 6 or more picture folders, place them in a document case(s) or records cartons and file them at the end of your collection. Begin numbering the picture box(es) with "Image Box 1"

Oversize papers or photographs (OP-,OP-P-, or OB-)

IS11.jpg
Oversize materials KK-cropped.jpg

Oversize papers or photographs is our medium size designation for flat items. This designation is for items that are too large to fit in legal folders but small enough that they do not need to be stored in the very large map and print folders. Oversize papers or photographs can be described as individual items or as groups of items. Regardless, the items live in folders stored in flat, large, grey storage boxes. You may enclose multiple items in each folder, but do not overstuff the folder such that the materials are at risk of injury each time an unwieldy folder is removed from the grey boxes. We house oversize papers and photographs similarly so they are grouped together in our documentation, but do keep in mind that we do NOT mix papers and photographs in the same large grey flat box.

There are some occasions in which it is not feasible to house the materials in folders, and they can simply live in the large, flat, grey box on their own. In that case, your items will have the designation of "oversize box or (OB-)."

Here are the specifics on handling oversize papers or photographs:

Oversize materials in the finding aid

Oversize materials are described in the finding aid as follows:

Individual items

EAD: <c0x><did><container type="opaper">OP-1234/1</container><unittitle>Map of North Carolina showing barbeque restaurants</unittitle></did></c0x>

Display: Oversize Paper OP-1234/1 Map of North Carolina showing barbeque restaurants

EAD: <c0x><did><container type="oimage">OP-P-1234/1</container><unittitle>Photograph of Serge Zwicker, 1993</unittitle></did></c0x>

Display: Oversize Image OP-P-1234/1 Photograph of Serge Zwicker, 1993

Groups of items housed in folders

EAD: <c0x><did><container type="opaperfolder">OP-1234/Folder 1-2</container><unittitle>Maps of southern states showing barbeque restaurants</unittitle></did></c0x>

Display: Oversize Paper Folder OP-1234/Folder 1-2 Maps of southern states showing barbeque restaurants

EAD: <c0x><did><container type="oimagefolder">OP-P-1234/Folder 1-5</container><unittitle>Photographs of 1993 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Men's Basketball Team</unittitle></did></c0x>

Display: Oversize Image Folder OP-P-1234/Folder 1-5 Photographs of 1993 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Men's Basketball Team


Groups of items housed in boxes

EAD: <c0x><did><container type="obox">OB-1234/1</container> <unittitle>Sheet music for various University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill fight songs</unittitle></did></c0x>

Display: Oversize Box OB-1234/1 Sheet music for various University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill fight songs

Note: At the moment, we do not designate in Oversize Box between a paper box and a photograph box. In general, we should not house photographs in the flat, gray boxes without folders. This container type is used for sturdy materials that will not be damaged if they are not placed in folders.

Labeling individual oversize items

Do your labeling neatly and in pencil in the top right hand corner on the back of the item with OP-0000, where OP is for oversize papers or OP-P-0000 where OP-P is for oversize photographs followed by the collection number. If you are describing your oversize items as a group, you do not need to label each individual oversize item. The label on the folder will suffice.

Labeling an oversize photograph
Oversize paper label
Oversize photograph label

Labeling oversize folders

Labeling a folder
With the fold at the top of the folder, do your labeling on the bottom right edge so that it is easy to see collection numbers as you flip through the folders in the map cases and flat boxes.
  • Label folders for oversize papers (individually described) with OP-0000, where the OP indicates oversize papers and is followed by the collection number.
  • Label folders for oversize papers (described as a group) with OPF-0000, where the OPF indicates oversize paper folder(s) and is followed by the collection number.
  • Label folders for oversize photographs (individually described) with OP-P-0000, where the OP-P indicates oversize photographs and is followed by the collection number.
  • Label folders for oversize photographs (described as a group) with OP-PF-0000, where the OP-PF indicates oversize photograph folder(s) and is followed by the collection number.

Number the folders according to how many are in each run (e.g., #1 of 1; #3 of 6). Restricted items should be isolated in their own folders. Stamp or write "RESTRICTED" in red on folders that contain restricted items in a clearly visible place near your other labeling.

Example of oversize folder containing individually described items; note that the "1-3" in OP-5600/1-3 means that this folder contains the individually numbered items, 1-3. The phrase "Folder 1 of 4" indicates that there are four paper folders in this collection and this is the first of the four
Example of oversize folder containing items described as a group the "F" in the prefix OPF differentiates these from the individually described items. Note that here items are not individually numbered, the "1 of 2" in OPF-5600/1 of 2 means that this is folder 1 of the 2 oversize paper folders in the collection
Example of oversize folder containing individually described items
Example of oversize folder containing items described as a group (The "F" in the prefix OPF differentiates these from the individually described items)

Housing oversize materials

Instead of separate runs for boxes of oversize folders (OPs), boxes of oversize photographs (OP-Ps), and boxes with other items, such as oversize photo-albums housed in the large flat boxes, these all live together in the same run. Collections are not housed in numerical order in this run; locations are tracked in the location table.

Note: There are two sizes of flat, gray boxes. The 16" x 20"s and the 2' x 3' (a.k.a. Jackie's Folly). Both sizes are represented with same container type (OP, OP-P, OB); in the finding aid, we do not distinguish between the two. The larger flat gray boxes are better for lighter materials since these boxes are difficult to maneuver on and off of the shelves.

16" x 20" boxes
2' x 3' boxes (a.k.a. Jackie's Folly)

Oversize papers in folders

The flag indicates that there is room for more folders
We house oversize papers Z-style, i.e. we fill each box before moving on to the next. When oversize papers are housed in folders, collections can intermingle, and can stretch across boxes. (e.g. oversize box 85 can hold 1 folder for collection number 5202, 2 folders for collection number 5124, and 3 folders for collection number 20405; the remaining 3 folders for collection 20405 can be in box 86). We put an indicator on the last box of oversize paper folders. You should fill that box before a new oversize paper box is started.

Oversize photographs in folders

The stickers on box 71 and 89 indicate that they are oversize photograph boxes
As with the oversize papers in folders, we want to fill an oversize photograph box before moving to the next. We put an indicator on the last box of oversize photograph folders. You should fill up that box before a new oversize photograph box is started. Just like with oversize papers, we can intermingle collections of oversize photographs in folders.

Oversize items not in folders

These should get their own box(es). Loose items from different collections, e.g. posters not in folders, should not be intermingled with items from other collections.

Putting folders in boxes

Boxes should only hold six to eight folders. If they have too many folders, it's difficult for Research and Instruction staff to flip through to find the folders they need to retrieve. Record the collection number on the sticker on the box's lid; the box number should also be recorded on the sticker. As a double-check, record the box number on the folder.

The sticker on the top of the box includes the box number and lists all the collections housed in that box
The box number is also recorded on the folder

Making a new oversize box

Pre-printed labels for new boxes can be found on the grey bookshelf in front of the vault in the manuscripts processing room.

There are sticky labels for recording collection numbers on the lid and "Photographs" labels for boxes with photographs.

Check the Supply Location List to find empty boxes.

Folder containing oversize box labels
Pre-printed labels

Extra-oversize papers or photographs (X-OP, X-OP-P-)

Map case1.jpg
IS12.jpg

The extra-oversize designation refers to our largest papers and photographs. These live in very large folders (typically called map and print folders) in map case drawers. Like oversize papers and photographs, extra-oversize papers or photographs can be described individually or in groups. Note that these materials are quite awkward for our Research and Instruction staff to page, so it is important to describe them thoroughly in the finding aid.

The extra-oversize designation is a relatively new development in the history of oversize papers at the SHC. In the past, all oversize papers were numbered OP-0000/n, regardless of whether they were housed in the grey boxes or in the map cases. A filing system and a coded list of oversize papers with Series A (map cases) and Series B (grey boxes) assignations steered Research and Instruction staff to the location of the item. This system became increasingly unwieldy and is superseded by the OP/XOP runs.

Extra-oversize materials in the finding aid

Extra-oversize materials are described in the finding aid as follows:

Describing individual items

EAD: <c0x><did><container type="xopaper">XOP-1234/1</container><unittitle>Map of North Carolina depicting historic sites</unittitle></did></c0x>

Display: Extra Oversize Paper XOP-1234/1 Map of North Carolina depicting historic sites

EAD: <c0x><did><container type="xoimage">XOP-P-1234/1</container><unittitle>Photograph of 2005 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill mens' basketball team</unittitle></did></c0x>

Display: Extra Oversize Image XOP-P-1234/1 Photograph of 2005 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill mens' basketball team

Describing groups

EAD: <c0x><did><container type="xopaperfolder">XOPF-1234/Folder 1-2</container><unittitle>Maps of southern states showing barbeque restaurants</unittitle></did></c0x>

Display: Extra Oversize Paper Folder XOPF-1234/Folder 1-2 Maps of southern states showing barbeque restaurants

EAD: <c0x><did><container type="xoimagefolder">XOP-PF-1234/Folder 1-5</container><unittitle>Photographs of 1993 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Men's Basketball Team</unittitle></did></c0x>

Display: Extra Oversize Image Folder XOP-PF-1234/Folder 1-5 Photographs of 1993 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Men's Basketball Team

Labeling extra-oversize items

Do your labeling neatly and in pencil in the top right hand corner on the back of the item with XOP-0000, where XOP is for oversize papers or with XOP-P-0000 where XOP-P is for oversize photographs followed by the collection number. As with oversize papers or photographs, if you are describing the the items as a group, you do not have to label each individual item. The folder label will suffice.

Labeling extra-oversize folders

Labeling a folder
With the fold at the top of the folder, do your labeling on the bottom right edge so that it is easy to see collection numbers as you flip through the folders in the map cases and flat boxes.
  • Label map case folders for extra-oversize papers (individually described) with XOP-0000, where the XOP indicates extra large oversize papers and is followed by the collection number.
  • Label map case folders for extra-oversize papers (described as a group) with XOPF-0000, where the XOPF indicates extra large oversize paper folder(s) and is followed by the collection number.
  • Label map case folders for extra-oversize photographs (individually described) with XOP-P-0000, where the XOP-P indicates extra large oversize photographs and is followed by the collection number.
  • Label map case folders for extra-oversize photographs (described as a group) with XOP-PF-0000, where the XOP-PF indicates extra large oversize photograph folder(s) and is followed by the collection number.

The collection creator is added under the collection number. Number the folders according to how many are in each run (e.g., #1 of 1; #3 of 6). Restricted items should be isolated in their own folders. Stamp or write "RESTRICTED" in red on folders that contain restricted items in a clearly visible place near your other labeling.


An extra-oversize folder containing individually described papers; note that the "1-3" in XOP-5600/1-3 means that this folder contains the individually numbered items, 1-3. The phrase "Folder 1 of 4" indicates that there are four extra-oversize paper folders in this collection and this is the first of the four
An extra-oversize folder containing papers described as a group; the "F" in the prefix XOPF differentiates these from the individually described items. Note that here items are not individually numbered, the "1 of 2" in XOPF-5600/1 of 2 means that this is folder 1 of the 2 extra-oversize paper folders in this collection
An extra-oversize folder containing individually described photographs
An extra-oversize folder containing photographs described as a group

Separated volumes (SV-)

Volume in folder.jpg
This volume fits into a legal size folder and can be housed in a document case or records center carton. It will NOT be treated as a separated volume.

Any volume that cannot be foldered and housed in document cases or records center cartons is a separated (SV) volume. Separated volumes should be marked clearly with SV-0000/n, where SV (for separated volume) is followed by the collection number and the individual volume number. Some separated volumes have custom boxes, but most are wrapped in alkaline paper and tied with linen tape to keep out dust and reduce abrasion. Separated volumes that likely will be used frequently may sit naked on the shelf because frequent use prevents dust from settling for too long on the volume. Separated volumes that are too large for wrapping or not valuable enough for custom boxes may be housed in a flat box (more than one volume may be housed in one box) or, as a last resort, sit naked on the shelf. Ask your supervising archivist if you are unsure of the best method to house and store your separated volumes.


Wrapping separated volumes

Separated volumes should be wrapped with archival paper. Because these volumes will be repeatedly wrapped and unwrapped, tape is not used. Instead, linen tape is used to keep the wrapping together. However, this does not mean that you can practice your boy/girl scout ties. A simple bow will suffice.

Just like wrapping a present...maybe without the weights.
The tying process: step 1.
The tying process: step 2.
The finished product.

Write the volume number on the wrapper so that it is clearly visible when the volume is placed on the shelf (typically on the edge of the package). Also write the volume number on the wrapper covering the top of the volume to reduce confusion when the volume is unwrapped and re-wrapped. For restricted volumes, stamp or write "RESTRICTED" in both places on the wrapper.

Wrapped volumes are labeled on the side so the label is clearly visible when the volume is placed on the shelf; they are also labeled on the top
A wrapped volume is on its way to shelf

Unwrapped volumes

Unwrapped volumes on shelves
Some volumes are too large or unwieldy to wrap or box. Generally, these are sturdy enough that they should not face too much harm sitting naked on the shelf.

You can pencil the SV number on the inside front cover of the volume, or write the number on strips of acid-free paper tucked into the volume. If you have a restricted volume, write "RESTRICTED" on the strip of paper, do not write RESTRICTED on the volume itself.

Volumes in boxes

Volumes may need the stability provided by a box. We typically have a supply of clamshell boxes that can be used for this purpose.

10" x 15" Clamshell boxes
Use the same box labels as for document cases or records center cartons; a box label for a volume looks like this
Occasionally, a volume may warrant a special box made by the Conservation Department


Special cases: oversize volumes in oversize boxes

Oversize volumes in oversize materials box
It's possible to use the flat, gray boxes for volumes. You may place more than one volume in a box, being mindful that the Research and Instruction staff will have to maneuver the boxes off and on the shelves.

You can pencil the SV number on the inside front cover of the volume, or write the number on strips of acid-free paper tucked into the volume. If you have a restricted volume, write "RESTRICTED" on the strip, do not write RESTRICTED on the volume itself.

These boxes will live in the same run as the other oversize materials and are treated in the same manner. See Housing Oversize Materials for specifics on housing volumes in flat, gray boxes.

Photograph albums (PA-)

Photograph albums are a special type of separated volume and receive item numbers starting with the prefix PA-0000/1. They receive this special designation because we want to be able to identify all photographic materials in case we have the opportunity to move all of our photographs to cold storage. See the Separated Volumes section for information on how to wrap or box photograph albums.

Photograph albums in boxes
Photograph albums wrapped

Special format photographs (SF-P-)

Special format photographs such as daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, and tintypes receive item numbers starting with SF-P-0000/1.

Special format photographs are placed in an alkaline envelope labeled with the item number; one or two envelopes then go into a small box
The small boxes are labeled with the item numbers
The small boxes are placed in larger grey boxes, which are labeled and placed on the shelves with the other special format photographs

Audiocassettes (C-)

Cassettes must have cases before they can be housed. Audiocassettes frequently arrive in their own containers and, typically, it is fine to use these.

Every audiocassette receives an item number starting with C-0000/1.

Audiocassettes are labeled on the tape itself
and on the spine of the J-card
Audiocassettes are housed Z-style in audiocassette boxes
and live in the AV aisle

Reel to reel audio tapes (T-)

Audiotapes must have boxes before they can be housed. Audiotapes frequently arrive in their own containers and typically, it is fine to use these.

Audiotapes receive item numbers starting with T-0000/1, where T (for tape) is followed by the collection number and the number of the individual audiotape.

Label the spine of the audiotape box but do not label the tape itself
Audiotapes live in their box on the shelf in the AV aisle; you do not need to house the tapes in collection number order

Audiodiscs (D-) (a.k.a. records or vinyl)

Audiodiscs should be stored in record jackets. If they have no jackets, place them in alkaline jackets. Audiodiscs receive item numbers starting with D-0000/1, where D (for disc) is followed by the collection number and the number of the individual disc.

Write the item number in the upper right corner of the jacket
Audiodiscs are housed Z-style in boxes corresponding to their size

Film (F-)

Films receive item numbers starting with F-0000/1, where F (for film) is followed by the collection number and the number of the individual film.

We decide how to provide housing for film on case-by-case basis. Consult with your supervising archivist on the available options.

Note: If a strange and unpleasant odor emanates from the film, you may be dealing with nitrate-based film. If you can detect the unpleasant odor before the canister is opened, DO NOT OPEN THE CAN. This film, used between 1915 and 1950, is highly unstable and can be dangerous. If you think that you have nitrate-based film, consult with a supervising archivist immediately.

Videotapes (VT-)

Videotapes must be stored in cases. Videotapes typically arrive in their own cases and it is typically fine to use these.

Label the videotape and videotape case with VT-0000/1, where VT (for videotape) is followed by the collection number and the individual item number.

You may have to create labels for the tape and the case.

The item number is recorded on the tape itself
and on the spine of the case
Videotapes generally live on the shelves standing vertically in their cases. Occasionally, if there are many videotapes for a collection, we will box them together

Discs: CDs and DVDs (CD-, DCD-, DVD-)

We distinguish between data compact discs (DCD), music compact discs (CD), and digital video discs (DVD), but they are all treated in much the same way.

Discs usually arrive with their own jewel cases and it is fine to use these.

Number each disc with item numbers starting with the prefix, for example DCD-0000/1, where DCD is followed by the collection number and the number of the individual item.

Record the item number on the disc's spine
and write the item number on the inner plastic part the disc with a special CD marking pen
Discs are housed Z-style with other discs of their like format

Floppy Discs (FD-)

Floppy discs are handled on a case by case basis. See your supervising archivist for help with floppy discs. If your supervising archivist decides that the content should not be migrated, you may follow this procedure:

Number each floppy on the disk label starting with FD-0000/1, where FD (for floppy disc) is followed by the collection number and the number of the individual item.


Place floppy disk(s) in an artifact box.
The artifact box is labeled with the item numbers
Place artifact box(es) in the next available document case
The document case should be appropriately labeled.

Rolled items (R-)

Rolled items
Rolled items should be marked clearly, starting with R-0000/1, where R (for rolled item) is followed by the collection number and the individual item number. Several drawers at the end of the extra-oversize papers in the map cases have been reserved for items that cannot or should not be unrolled. Consult with you supervising archivist about whether or not to unroll a questionable item.

Other formats

Items separated can also include wire recordings, microforms, digital audio tape (DAT), computer tapes, and framed items. See your supervising archivist for help with housings these items.

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