XML at UNC: Create New

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Contents

Create A New Finding Aid

UNCEAD2002 Templates

Open NoteTab. If you are asked if you want to accept revisions that have been made by another application or user, say yes. Your screen should look as noted in the NoteTab Tour.

Under Initiate New FAID, choose what kind of finding aid you want to initiate by double clicking on Create SHC Finding Aid, Create GM Finding Aid, Create SFC Finding Aid, or Create UA Finding Aid.

Your file name tab is NoName01.xml; that will change shortly. Note that the document window is now filled with the basic statements that make EAD go. You must never touch these statements (please). Floating in front of those statements, you should see a fill-in-the-blank dialog box with the title Template Wizard: Page001.xml, which politely requests that you fill in the template. There are just a few differences among these templates that generate the beginnings of SHC, SFC, UA, and GM finding aids. Examples in the templates dialog boxes are different. Some of the other differences are noted below; others just show up (e.g., the repository name is different for each section and the University Archives template doesn't include the copyright notice).

Fill in the template dialog box fields. You can click your cursor into each field or use the tab key to move forward (use shift + tab to move backwards) on a dialog box page. If you make a mistake after leaving a dialog box page, you can start over again (close the document and don't save it) or you can correct the mistake in the actual document when it displays after you finish with all the dialog box pages.

Type of FAID:
  • Use the drop box to select "Inventory" or "Preliminary Inventory." These will yield "Inventory to the Terry Sanford Papers" or "Preliminary Inventory to the Vice-Chancellor for Fiscal Crisis Records," a format that is slightly different from what we used in the pre-EAD era, but is compliant with NCEAD and national standards.
Collection title:
  • Give the full collection title. Include the appropriate term (papers, records, collection, etc.) at the end of the name.
Collection number:
  • Enter the collection number without # (whether 4 or 5 digits). If you are working on a z collection, add the z here (e.g., 4266-z).
File name:
  • This field creates the finding aid's file name; the extension .xml is automatically added. The file name is the collection number filled out to 5 digits (for the SHC, the first digit is always zero; SFC, UA, and GM always have 5 digits to begin with and so don't need to add a zero).
Beginning date for materials (yyyy):
  • Single dates: For a date that's a single day or a single year, enter the information in this field. The templates default to what you're going to want 99% of the time. See Modifying Template-Generated Date Information below for how to modify tags to reflect date singleness.
  • For a span of dates, enter the date(s) that should appear BEFORE the final hyphen in the date span. Remember that normalized dates can't accommodate "circa" or "s" or other modifiers. If you enter a date like "circa 1958" or "1920s" here, you'll have to remove the "circa" and/or the "s" from the normalized dates after you finish the template section. Normalized dates also can't accommodate interrupted date spans. For all non-normal stuff, see Modifying Template-Generated Date Information below.
Here are some variations:
  • 1900-1950:
  • Enter 1900 in this field
  • 1900, 1920-1950:
  • Enter 1900, 1920 in this field.
  • 1900-1930, 1950:
  • Enter 1900 in this field.
  • 1900-1930, 1940-1950:
  • Enter 1900-1930, 1940 in this field.
  • 1900-1950 (bulk 1923-1932):
  • circa 1900-1950s:
  • Enter circa 1900 in this field. Remember that normalized dates can't accommodate "circa" or "s" or other modifiers. If you enter a date like "circa 1958" or "1920s" here, you'll have to remove the "circa" and/or the "s" from the normalized dates after you finish the template section (see Modifying Template-Generated Date Information below).
Ending date for materials (yyyy):
  • For a date that's a single day or a single year, skip this field.
  • For a span of dates, enter the date(s) that should appear AFTER the final hyphen in the date span. Remember that normalized dates can't accommodate "circa" or "s" or other modifiers. If you enter a date like "circa 1958" or "1920s" here, you'll have to remove the "circa" and/or the "s" from the normalized dates after you finish the template section. Normalized dates also can't accommodate interrupted date spans. For all non-normal stuff, see Modifying Template-Generated Date Information below.
Here are some variations:
  • 1900-1950:
  • Enter 1950 in this field.
  • 1900, 1920-1950:
  • Enter 1950 in this field.
  • 1900-1930, 1950:
  • Enter 1930, 1950 in this field.
  • 1900-1930, 1940-1950:
  • Enter 1950 in this field.
  • 1900-1950 (bulk 1923-1932):
  • circa 1900-1950s:
  • Enter 1950s in this field.

CLICK Okay.

Name of the person who encoded the FAID:
  • Enter name of that person.
Date encoding was finished (month yyyy):
  • Enter month and year the finding aid was encoded. No comma between the month and year.
Name of the person(s) who processed the collection:
  • Enter the person(s) who processed the collection. It's perfectly legit to enter Library Staff here if there are an overabundance of past processors or it it's difficult to determine exactly who processed the collection. For University Archives, University Archives Staff is automatically entered.
Date processing was finished (month yyyy):
  • Enter month (if known) and year processing was finished. If the year's unknown, take a guess. No comma between the month and year.

CLICK Okay.

Number of items in the collection:
  • Enter the numeral only (e.g., 1 or 6,0000).
Number of linear feet:
  • When there are linear feet, enter the numeral only (e.g., 0.5 or 100.0).

CLICK Okay.

Type of creator:
  • Select from drop box.
Name of creator:
  • Enter what you know of the creator's name. Please type personal names in inverted order (last name, first name). The cataloger will do authority work on the name before writing the MARC record(s).

CLICK Okay.

Language of materials in the collection:
  • Select from drop box. Select English unless almost all of the materials are in another language. If you select a language other than English, make sure that you include language information in the abstract and in the scope and content note. If you need to specify a language other than the ones you find in the drop box, contact Lynn.

CLICK Okay.

Provenance information:
  • Include all of the information you know. Make multiple statements as necessary, including them all in one paragraph in the dialog box. You don't have to say which materials came from whom.
  • For donated materials, use:
Received from whomever of wherever in whenever (Acc. accession number).
  • For transferred materials, use:
Transferred from whomever of wherever in whenever (Acc. accession number).
  • For purchased materials, use:
Purchased from whomever of wherever in whenever (Acc. accession number).
  • For University Archives, the following is automatically entered:
Periodic transfers from the offices that create these records.
  • Here's a complex example:
Received from Molly Maguire of Dublin, Ireland, in 1942; transferred from the Rare Book Collection, 
UNC-CH, in 1977; received from Minnie Maguire of Wilmington, N.C., 
in November 1996 (Acc. 98111) and January 1999 (Acc. 99003).

CLICK Okay to complete the dialog box.

Note that:

  • Your file name has changed from uncead.tpl to the file name you specified with the .xml extension. The file has been saved as c:\notetab\ead2002\filename.xml.
  • You have a document that begins with
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="no"?>
and ends with
</archdesc>
</ead>

In between, you have a lot of essential EAD tagging (the stuff that makes the document go) and lots of places you're going to fill in. The parts to fill in chiefly appear as commented-out areas (the technical term for those grayed-out parts) in the finding aid. The good news is that you've got the basic outline of the finding aid, with valid beginning and ending tags, right there from the start. There isn't much bad news.

Modifying Template-Generated Date Information

Single dates: The templates are set to default to inclusive dates. When you have a collection-level single date, you'll have to make a few modifications after you've finished the template section.

There are three places where the template will insert your single date into a normal attribute. At those same three places, you'll find that the date (or unitdate) also has type="inclusive." You can make all the changes you need for a single date in one pass. Search for the word normal. You will find three instances: one is the <date> tag set in <filedesc>; another is the <date> tag set in <frontmatter>; the third is in the <unitdate> tag set in the <unittitle> section of <archdesc>. In each case, delete the / in the normal attribute; the type="inclusive"; and the - after the single date:

<date normal="1999/" type="inclusive">1999-</date>

becomes:

<date normal="1999">1999</date>

and


<unitdate normal="1999/" type="inclusive">1999-</unitdate>

becomes:

<unitdate normal="1999">1999</unitdate>

Circa, s, etc.: Normalized dates can't accommodate "circa" or "s" or other date modifiers. If you enter a date like "circa 1958" or "1920s," you'll have to remove the "circa" or the "s" from the normalized dates after you finish the template section. Search for the word normal. You will find three instances: one is the <date> tag set in <filedesc>; another is the <date> tag set in <frontmatter>; the third is in the <unitdate> tag set in the <unittitle> section of <archdesc>. In each case, delete the "circa" or "s" or whatever you've added from the normal attribute:

<date normal="circa 1920/" type="inclusive">circa 1920-1950s</date>

becomes:

<date normal="1920/1950" type="inclusive">circa 1920-1950s</date>

and

<unitdate normal="circa 1920/1950s" type="inclusive">circa 1920-1950s</unitdate>

becomes:

<unitdate normal="1920/1950" type="inclusive">circa 1920-1950s</unitdate>

Interrupted date spans: Normalized dates can't accommodate interrupted date spans like "1795, 1822-1865, 1920" or variations thereof. If you enter dates like that, you'll have to edit the normalized dates after you finish the template section to make them into a simple date span. Search for the word normal. You will find three instances: one is the <date> tag set in <filedesc>; another is the <date> tag set in <frontmatter>; the third is in the <unitdate> tag set in the <unittitle> section of <archdesc>. In each case, edit the normal attribute to make a simple date span:

<date normal="1795/1822-1865,1920" type="inclusive">1795, 1822-1865, 1920</date>

becomes:

<date normal="1795/1920" type="inclusive">1795, 1822-1865, 1920</date>

and

<unitdate normal="1795/1822-1865,1920" type="inclusive">1795, 1822-1865, 1920</date>

becomes:

<unit date normal="1795/1920" type="inclusive">1795, 1822-1865, 1920</date>

Bulk dates: If you want bulk dates, you'll only want them in the <archdesc> <unittitle label="Title" encodinganalog="245"> section. Since the template can't accommodate two sets of dates, you'll have to add a bulk dates set of <unitdate> tags by hand after you complete the template. Here's an example of bulk dates added. Note the non-breaking space ( ) between the two sets of <unitdate> tags, which is necessary when you want to display a space between two tags that butt up against one another . Note also that the bulk dates are enclosed in parenthesis with the word "bulk":

<unittitle label="Title" encodinganalog="245">E. J. Hale Papers, <unitdate normal="1815/1936" 
type="inclusive">1815-1936</unitdate> <unitdate normal="1890/1920" type="bulk">(bulk 1890-
1920)</unitdate></unittitle>

Save, Parse, View

An important step in producing EAD-encoded finding aids is parsing (or validating) your document. When you parse a document, you are checking that it's in compliance with the rules set out in the EAD DTD. One of the wonderful things about creating finding aids in NoteTab is that (largely because NoteTab is smart about adding closing tags) you can parse your document as you go along. You can also very easily view your document in IE for proof-reading and display checking. Frequent parsing and viewing means that you don't have to deal with massive corrections at the end of the process and that you can proceed with confidence from section to section.

Here is the quick and easy way to parse and view. First you must save the file.

Save the file: When a file has been altered and those alterations have not yet been saved, the icon on the filename tab is red. Click on the disk icon (save file) in the icon bar. After you click on the disk icon (save file), the red icon on the file name tab is grayed. The file has been saved as c:\notetab\ead2002\filename.xml. As soon as you change anything in the file, the icon on the file name tab will turn red again, alerting you to fact that there's unsaved data in the file.

Parse the finding aid: Under Finalize FAID, double click on Parse FAID. The parser window will flash, and a error.txt file name tab will appear. The parser has created a file called error.txt to hold the results of its activity. The contents of error.txt will appear in the document window.

If you have no errors, the contents of error.txt will display as:

C:\notetab\ead2002\filename.xml is valid

Congratulations! You are parsed and ready to view.

If you have one or more errors, you'll see something like this:

C:/notetab/ead2002/00325.xml [108:17] : Error: element content invalid. Element 'p' is not
 expected here, expecting 'abbr', 'address', 'archref', 'bibref', 'blockquote', 'chronlist', 
'corpname', 'date', 'emph', 'expan', 'extptr', 'extref', 'famname', 'function', 'genreform',
 'geogname', 'lb', 'linkgrp', 'list', 'name', 'note', 'num', 'occupation', 'origination', 
'persname', 'ptr', 'ref', 'repository', 'subject', 'table', 'title', 'unitdate', 'unittitle' or 
'</p>'
  Line   108: <p>Send help.<p></userestrict>
  Col     17: ----------------^

This message tells you that the <p> before </userestrict> is not right (the parser's so polite that it tells you that the <p> is "unexpected"). Any of the tags offered will either start a new element that could occur here or end the <p> statement. It also tells you that the problem happens at line 108, position (column) 17. Sometimes those line/position numbers can be misleading (if the error is really caused by something a bit further back, but the parser only realizes that there's something wrong when it gets to the point indicated), but many times they're useful. In this case, the </p> is, of course, the right choice.

Go back to your document and correct the error. Here's where line numbers and the W icon come into play. The W icon toggles word wrap on and off in the document window. When you're working on your document, you'll want word wrap on so that you can see what you're doing. You needn't turn word wrap off to run the parser. However, because the parser reads the document window as though word wrap WERE turned off, you'll need to turn word wrap off to find the line on which the parser has discovered an error.

After you've corrected the first error, save the file and parse again. The parser will inform you of one error at a time. Keep going until you are error-free.

Note that one of the most frequent parsing errors is failure to use the code for special characters. Your document won't parse with characters like & or é writ plain. You can easily insert good code for these characters from pull-down menu in the Special Characters Dialog Box under Other Elements on the sidebar.

You'll know that there are no more errors when error.txt reads:

C:\notetab\ead2002\filename.xml is valid

View the finding aid: Making sure that you've got your document in the document window (not error.txt), click on that weird rattle/world-on-a-stick icon (view in browser). This will cause IE to load and display your document. The way the document looks is determined by a stylesheet that tells the browser how to display the document. The stylesheet automatically creates a menu at the top of the document with entries that are hot-linked to various parts of the document. It also automatically adds links back to the menu from those lower parts.

The document you're working on (the xml document) is only viewable with Internet Explorer 6 (that's your default viewer in NoteTab) and above. Eventually, your document will be served up on our website along with an html version that is created at the end of the editing process. Printed pdf-versions, too.

Lovely, no?

After you've saved, parsed, and viewed, you know that all's well with what you've done so far.

The following is one way of proceeding with the finding aid; you'll probably come up with variations that suit your own style. Whatever you do to produce a completed finding aid, know that frequent saving, parsing, and viewing is NOT optional. You're responsible for completing a saved, parsed, viewable finding aid. Don't be shy about asking for help if things get bogged down.

Also remember that you must ALWAYS work on files on the c: drive, but save them at the end of each NoteTab session to the g: drive. See File Management above for how to do this.

The Rest of the Finding Aid

Now you're ready to go through the finding aid, adding data as needed and required. You can do this by looking for commented-out areas in the finding aid. They will tell you what information is required and what is optional. Here's how to use those commented-out areas.

Commented-out areas don't display on the web (hence the name). They typically contain instructions, notes, etc., that are not for public consumption. Commented-out areas begin and end with special code. They begin with:

<!--space

and end with

-->

Remove the <!--space and the --> and whatever's between them is activated. You can see this easily in NoteTab because commented-out areas are gray. When you remove the <!--space and the -->, the tags that were gray turn blue. Note that you MUST remove both the <!--space and the -->. If you forget to remove the -->, you get a parsing error like this:

C:/notetab/ead2002/efo~1.xml [51:1] : Error: unexpected character content within element 
'eadheader'
  Line    51: </eadheader>
  Col      1: ^

The parser thinks that there's something weird before </eadheader>. There is; it's the --> that should have been deleted.

You will find commented-out areas that relate to optional tags (tags that are used only under certain circumstances) and required tags (tags that you'll definitely activate). If an optional tag is not being used, you needn't delete it. In fact, you shouldn't delete it because your finding aid may be revised in future, and those optional tags may then be needed.

If you delete a commented-out area by mistake, don't worry. The tags can always be added at some later date. If you activate a commented-out area that you don't want to use, simply replace the commented-out tags. Make sure there's a

<!--space

at the left margin at the beginning of the area and a

-->

at the left margin at the end of the area.

Finding Aid Revision Statements

Starting from the top of the finding aid, the first commented-out area relates to finding aid revisions. These tags are about revising EAD-encoded finding aids. If you're creating a new finding aid, you won't use these tags. If you're revising a finding aid that has never been EAD-encoded, you won't use these tags. If you're revising a finding aid that was already EAD-encoded, these tags should be activated and filled in. See Revisions to EAD-Encoded Finding Aids.

Abstract The next commented-out areas are the two required tags that generate the two parts of the abstract. These tags, however, don't get filled in until the scope and content note is written. Don't do anything with them now.

Access Restrictions, Usage Restrictions, Alternative Forms, Processing Information, Additional Descriptive Resources

The first two of the next six commented-out areas need to be dealt with; the last four are optional.

The first is where you spell out the access restriction(s). If you do not have access restrictions, remove the comment tags.

<accessrestrict>
<head>Restrictions to Access</head>
<p>Use of audiotapes or videotapes may require production of listening 
or viewing copies.</p></accessrestrict>

The second is where you spell out the usage restriction(s). If you do not have usage restrictions, remove the comment tags.

<userestrict>
<head>Usage Restrictions</head>
<p>Photocopying in Series 1 restricted as follows: no more than three consecutive pages 
may be copied; no more than ten pages from any one novel may be copied. 
</p></userestrict>

The third is activated when there's an alternative form of the materials in the collection in the form of microfilm. Finding aids for collections with microfilm have to include reel lists. That's what this area is about.

<altformavail encodinganalog="530">
<head>Alternate Form of Material</head>
<p>Microfilm copy (filmed August 2004) available.
<list type="simple">
<item>Reel 1: Folders 1-14</item>
<item>Reel 2: Folders 15-28</item>
</list></p>
</altformavail>

The fourth is used when there's an alternative form of the materials in the collection that's anything BUT microfilm.

<altformavail encodinganalog="530">
<head>Alternate Form of Material</head>
<p>Typescripts of all letters, 1900-1902, are available.</p>
</altformavail>

The fifth is used for significant processing information. You'll find that you've already turned this section on in the course of entering data in the templates about who processed the collection and when. When you first see this section, it'll look something like this:

<processinfo>
<head>Processing Information</head>
<p>Processed by: Carolyn Wallace, William Auman, Roslyn Holdzkom, 1969, 1985, 1996</p>
<p>Encoded by: Roslyn Holdzkom, January 2004</p>
<!-- other processing info (e.g., grant supported) 
<p>Other processing info</p>
-->
</processinfo>
If you have other processing information to add (e.g., information on revising EAD-encoded finding aids, some weird and unavoidable arrangement scheme, you're revising an EAD-encoded finding aid), simply delete the lines beginning with
<!--space and -->
and enter your information between however many sets of

tags you need.

<processinfo>
<head>Processing Information</head>
<p>Processed by: Carolyn Wallace, William Auman, Roslyn Holdzkom, 1969, 1985, 1996</p>
<p>Encoded by: Roslyn Holdzkom, November 2003</p>
<p>This collection was processed with support from the National Endowment for the
 Humanities.</p>
<p>The Addition of November 2001 is arranged in the same way as, but has not been incorporated
 into, the original deposit of materials.</p>
<p>Additions received after February 1995 have not been integrated into the original deposits. 
Researchers should always check additions to be sure they have identified all files of
 interest to them.</p>
<p>Finding aid updated in January 2004 by Roslyn Holdzkom because of addition.</p>
</processinfo>

The sixth is where you can refer to additional guides (card files, dealers' or donor lists, etc.) for the materials in your collection.

<otherfindaid>
<head>Additional Descriptive Resources</head>
<p>A card file listing Series 1 correspondents is available in the repository.</p>
</otherfindaid>

Note on adding support information to the <eadheader>: If a grant or other funding source has supplied the funding for processing your collection (your supervising archivist should let you know) you'll need to add sponsor information to the <eadheader>. Having that information in <eadheader> will allow us to sort by supporting agency/individual, which will produce useful statistics for new grant applications, year-end reports, etc. To do this, add <sponsor> tags within the <titlestmt> tags right after </author>:

<titlestmt>
<titleproper encodinganalog="title">Inventory of the Hetty Holdzkom Papers,
<date normal="1994/2000">1994-2000</date> (3531)
</titleproper>
<author encodinganalog="creator">Processed by: Roslyn Holdzkom; machine-readable finding aid
 created by: Roslyn Holdzkom</author>
<sponsor>This collection was processed with support from the National Endowment for the
 Humanities.</sponsor>
</titlestmt>

Now's a good time to Save, Parse, View.

Subject Headings The next commented-out area deals with subject headings. This is a required area, but should not be tackled until the abstract is written. Don't do anything with it now.

Related Material

Use to cite closely related materials whether within the Manuscripts Department or elsewhere. This is has to be CLOSELY related material.

<relatedmaterial encodinganalog="544">
<head>Related Collection</head>
<list type="simple">
<item>Duncan Donald McColl Papers, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina</item>
</list>
</relatedmaterial>

Biographical/Historical Note

The biographical/historical note, a required tag, is next. Even if information is scant, you can surely say something about who the people were or what the organization did. Remember to chose either Biographical or Historical for your heading.

f you wish to create a biographical/historical note that includes a chronological list, you can use the <chronlist> tags and the <chronitem> dialog box that are available from the clip library sidebar. You can also type the tags yourself or use the <chronlist> tags and the <chronitem> dialog box from the sidebar to generate the first tags, then copy and paste as explained in the component section below.

Here are examples of a short bio notes. Do NOT content tag biographical/historical notes (<title> tags are okay, since part of their job is to format text with italics or quotation marks).

<bioghist encodinganalog="545">
<head>Biographical Note</head>
<p>Chang and Eng Bunker (1811-1874), the original Siamese twins, were born in Meklong, Siam, and
 were brought from Bangkok to Boston in 1829. After extensive tours in North America and Europe,
 they settled in Wilkes County (later Surry County), N.C., were naturalized, and received the 
surname Bunker by act of the legislature.</p>
<p>In 1843, Chang and Eng Bunker married Sarah and Adelaide Yates, daughters of David Yates of 
Wilkes County, N.C. Chang had ten children; Eng had nine children. They continued to make 
exhibition tours until about 1870.</p>
</bioghist>

<bioghist encodinganalog="545">
<head>Biographical Note</head>
<chronlist>
<chronitem>
<date>1966</date>
<event>He was born</event>
</chronitem>
<chronitem>
<date>1997</date>
<event>He died</event>
</chronitem>
</chronlist>
</bioghist>

Now's a good time to Save, Parse, View.

Scope and Content Note Next comes the scope and content note, also called the collection overview. This, like the abstract and the subject headings areas has to wait. It should not be done until the series/subseries descriptions are written. Don't do anything with it now.

Items Separated

The <separatedmaterial> information appears right below the Scope and Content Note, a more logical placement than its previous position at the end of the finding aid. Use when there's material that's part of the collection, but stored separately.

<separatedmaterial>
<head>Items Separated</head>
<list type=”simple”>
<item>Oversize papers (OP-4776/1-15)</item>
<item>Photographs (P-4776/Folders 1-48)</item>
<item>Photograph albums (PA-4776/1-4)</item>
</list>
</separatedmaterial>

Detailed Description of the Collection (components)

Now comes the biggie.

REMEMBER TO Save, Parse, View FREQUENTLY (like after every series/subseries or considerable dollops thereof).

All of your nicely nested c0x tags will go where Enter Description Information Here appears:

<!-- REQUIRED: DETAILED COLLECTION INFORMATION GOES HERE.
<dsc type="combined">
<head>Detailed Description of the Collection</head>

Enter Descriptive Information Here

</dsc>
-->

Delete the <!-- and the -->. Delete Enter Descriptive Information Here.

Go to the Component Information section of the clip library sidebar.

If you have only one series, double click on Series Tags (one series). Activate the tags and add/modify information as needed.

<!-- Type the series title after <unittitle> and before the comma; delete tags that are not used

<c01 level="collection"><did><unittitle> , <unitdate normal="YYYYMMDD/YYYYMMDD" type="inclusive">
</unitdate>.</unittitle>
<physdesc><extent> items.</extent></physdesc>
</did>
<arrangement><p>Arrangement: .</p></arrangement>
<scopecontent>
<p></p>
</scopecontent>

ADD FILES OR ITEMS HERE

</c01>

If you have more than one series, double click on Series Tags (multiple series). Activate the tags and add/modify information as needed.

<!-- Replace the ? after <unittitle> with the series number; type the series title before the 
comma; delete tags that are not used; in rare instances, you may need to change the c01 level

<c01 level="series"><did><unittitle>?. , <unitdate normal="YYYYMMDD/YYYYMMDD"
 type="inclusive">
</unitdate>.</unittitle>
<physdesc><extent> items.</extent></physdesc>
</did>
<arrangement><p>Arrangement: .</p></arrangement>
<scopecontent>
<p></p>
</scopecontent>

ADD SUBSERIES, FILES, OR ITEMS HERE

</c01>
-->

Replace ADD SUBSERIES, FILES, OR ITEMS HERE with the appropriate level tags. Subseries Tags are available from the clip library sidebar. Activate the tags and add/replace information as needed.

<c0x level="subseries"><did><unittitle>?.?. , <unitdate type="inclusive"></unitdate>.</unittitle>
<physdesc><extent> items.</extent></physdesc>
</did>
<arrangement><p>Arrangement: .</p></arrangement>
<scopecontent>
<p></p>
</scopecontent>

ADD SUBSERIES, FILES, OR ITEMS HERE

</c0x>
-->

Within series and subseries, you'll be listing files and items that may or may not have containers affiliated with them. See Container Types for how to code the various types of containers.

Files and items may also vary as to whether or not there's scope and content information requiring the use of <scopecontent> tags. Standard practice is to include title, date, and extent information between the <unittitle> tags. Any other descriptive information goes between the <scopecontent> tags. There will be judgment calls here; when in doubt, use the <scopecontent> tags.

There are four clips in the clip library sidebar for the four permutations of these tags. Here are the tag sets with examples of each.

c0x w/Cont. No.: For files and items with container numbers, but without scope and content information:

<c0x><did><container type="?"></container>
<unittitle></unittitle></did></c0x>

<c04><did><container type="folder">9</container>
<unittitle>Correspondence, <unitdate type="inclusive">1919</unitdate>
</unittitle></did></c04>

c0x w/o Cont. No.: For files and items without container numbers and without scope and content information

<c0x><did><unittitle></unittitle></did></c0x>

<c04><did><unittitle>Volume 9, <unitdate type="inclusive">1888-1889</unitdate>,
 486 pp.</unittitle></did></c04>

c0x w/Cont. No., s/c: For files and items with container numbers and with scope and content information:

<c0x><did><container type="?"></container>
<unittitle></unittitle></did>
<scopecontent><p></p></scopecontent></c0x>

<c04><did><container type="folder">9</container>
<unittitle>Speech: <title render= "doublequote">How Are We Doing?</title> <unitdate
 type="inclusive">1919</unitdate></unittitle></did>
<scopecontent><p>Present to the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Greensboro, N.C.</p></scopecontent>
</c04>

c0x w/o Cont. No., s/c: For files and items without containers, but with scope and content information:

<c0x><did><unittitle></unittitle></did>
<scopecontent><p></p></scopecontent></c0x>

<c04><did><unittitle>American Forestry Society, <unitdate type="inclusive">1979</unitdate>
</unittitle></did>
<scopecontent><p>Correspondence with Fern Apple</p></scopecontent></c04>

Use these as required. A good way to proceed with numerous c0x's is to use the clips to establish the format you want, then copy and paste to replicate the tags.

Here's an example of a fully marked-up series with subseries, items without containers, and files with containers. Note the content tagging.

<c01 level="series"><did><unittitle>3. Personal Materials, <unitdate normal="1977/1990" 
type="inclusive">1977-1990s</unitdate>.</unittitle>
<physdesc><extent>About 55 items.</extent></physdesc></did>

<c02 level="subseries"><did><unittitle>3.1. Journals, <unitdate 
type="inclusive">1977-1980</unitdate>.</unittitle>
<physdesc><extent>5 items.</extent></physdesc></did>
<arrangement><p>Arrangement: chronological.</p></arrangement>
<scopecontent>
<p>Personal journals of Anne Romaine. <genreform>Journal</genreform> entries mostly deal with her
feelings about the status of her work and her <subject>romantic relationships</subject>, 
particularly difficulties relating to being a <subject>divorced woman</subject> pursuing a 
career.</p>
</scopecontent>
<c03><did><container type="folder">122</container>
<unittitle>Journals</unittitle></did></c03>
</c02>

<c02 level="subseries"><did><unittitle>3.2. Astrology and Related Materials, <unitdate 
type="inclusive">1980s-1990s</unitdate>.</unittitle>
<physdesc><extent>About 50 items.</extent></physdesc>
</did>
<arrangement><p>Arrangement: chronological.</p></arrangement>
<scopecontent>
<p>Personalized horoscopes and notes and audiotapes of psychic readings. Anne Romaine had a 
strong interest in astrology and visited psychics to consult about her future. The notes were 
taken during consultations with psychics, and the tapes are recordings of these consultations.</p>
</scopecontent>
<c03><did><unittitle>FS-4279: Reading with Bambi Barrett, <unitdate>17 December 1991</unitdate>
</unittitle></did></c03>
<c03><did><container type="folder">123</container>
<unittitle>Horoscope</unittitle></did>
<scopecontent><p>Includes several versions of charts</p></scopecontent></c03>
<c03><did><container type="folder">124</container>
<unittitle>Psychic readings notes</unittitle></did></c03>
</c02>
</c01>

A note about adding restriction or processing information at the series or subseries level: If there's information that should be added at the series or subseries level, insert the necessary tags before the series or subseries <scopecontent> tag. You'll find the tags you probably want in the Other Elements section of the clip sidebar. Here's how they display:

<accessrestrict>
<p>Restriction: Enter Restrictions Note.</p>
</accessrestrict>

<processinfo>
<p>Processing Note: Enter Note.</p>
</processinfo>

<userestrict>
<p>Use Restriction: Enter Restrictions Note.</p>
</userestrict>

And here's an example of use:

<c01 level="series"><did><unittitle>2. Administrative Materials, <unitdate normal="1920/1988"
 type="inclusive">1920-1988</unitdate>.</unittitle>
<physdesc><extent>About 9,000 items.</extent></physdesc>
</did>

<arrangement><p>Arrangement: alphabetical, then chronological.</p></arrangement>

<accessrestrict>
<p>Restriction: Closed until 2099.</p>
</accessrestrict>
<processinfo>
<p>Processing Note: Unprocessed.</p>
</processinfo>

<scopecontent>

Now's DEFINITELY a good time to Save, Parse, View.

You're almost done!

Scope and Content Note for Real

Now do the scope and content note. If you're following recommended procedure (see "How to Proceed"), you've written the individual series/subseries scope and content notes so that you can easily write the scope and content note from them (copying, pasting, and editing for conciseness and smoothness is encouraged).

Recommended procedure will have you using the scope and content note in writing the abstract. The abstract, of course, gives rise to the access points (subject headings) that allow for retrieval of the collection. Therefore, remember to write the scope and content note so that you can create a scope and content abstract that will give rise to the right subject headings.

The scope and content note is required, but the arrangement note, which lays out the series/subseries and falls within the scope and content note's <scopecontent> tags, is optional. Delete the <arrangement> tags when there's only one series. Use the <arrangement> tags when there's more that one series.

Here's an example of a scope and content note with an arrangement note.

<scopecontent>
<head>Scope and Content</head>
<p>The J. Taylor Doggett collection consists of audio cassettes and printed 
materials that document Doggett's research on the 1950s R&B singing group 
the 5 Royales.</p>
<p>Audio cassettes consist of an air-check of a radio documentary about the group, a sampler
tape of related recordings made by the group for different recording labels, and a log of the
sampler tape annotated by Doggett. Musicians also heard on these recordings are Pee Wee 
Burris, Clarence Paul, EL Pauling, Curtis Pauling, the Royal Sons, EL Pauling and the 
Royalton, and the Charlie <emph render="doublequote">Little Jazz</emph> Ferguson Orchestra. 
Among the printed materials are two self-published books on the 5 Royales that J. Taylor 
Doggett wrote in the 1990s. The books include a pictorial history of the group, a song-by-song 
analysis of vocal lead and part singing on their related recordings, and Doggett's extensive 
notes. Also included are several in-depth articles on the 5 Royales for U.S. and U.K. 
publications, Doggett's published interview with the group, and three long articles written 
about the group for North Carolina newspapers in the early 1990s.</p>

<arrangement encodinganalog="351">
<head>Arrangement of Collection</head>
<list type="simple">
<item>1. Audio Cassettes</item>
<item>1.1. 5 Royales</item>
<item>1.2. Other Artists</item>
<item>2. Printed Material</item>
<item>Addition of December 1999</item>
<item>Addition of January 2001</item>
</list>
</organization>
</scopecontent>

Now's a good time to Save, Parse, View.

Abstracts and Subject Headings

You can take a stab at the abstracts and the subject headings, even though the departmental cataloger will most likely revise some of what you do. Abstracts come in two flavors: the biographical/historical section and the scope and content section. They are constructed as separate abstracts so that the different MARC21 encoding analogs can be used. The first abstract has encodinganalog="545"; this refers to the MARC21 field for biographical/historical information. The second abstract has encodinganalog="520"; this refers to the MARC21 field for scope and content information. Subject headings can be taken from either abstract, so try not to repeat information. These two abstracts will display as one paragraph under the heading Abstract, which is included in the first abstract's tag:

<abstract label="Abstract" encodinganalog="545"></abstract>

The biographical/historical abstract should be brief, but needs to have enough information to clearly identify the creator(s). Remember that you've had the chance to elaborate on this information in <bioghist>, so you needn't elaborate too much here.

If you've been following recommended procedure, you should be able to copy the scope and content note into the scope content abstract, delete any content tags (<abstract> can't include any internal tagging except for <title> and <emph>), perhaps edit it down a bit, and call it done. The scope and content abstract often starts with "The collection includes …" or words to that effect.

<abstract encodinganalog="520"></abstract>

The access points to the collection (subject headings) are derived from both abstracts. The commented-out instructions let you opt out of authority work here. In fact, whether or not you write authorized versions of names and subjects, the departmental cataloger will do authority work on the names and review/select authorized subject headings.

If you want to do the full <controlaccess> tagging, you should use the Item tags dialog box found under Control access information in the clip sidebar. The dialog box will supply the source and encoding analog information you need. If you're just suggesting headings or don't want to mess with actual terms, simply put your suggestions between <item> tags in the list. The example below shows the suggested headings mode.

<controlaccess>
<head>Subject Headings</head>
<list type="simple">
<item>make sure to include something about part-time missionaries</item>
<item>Sonja Henie</item>
</list>

If you're going to do actual terms, get the full tag sets from the Item Tags Dialog Box under Control Access Information in the clip library side bar; the tags in the Frequently Used Tags section won't give you the source or encodinganalog attributes. Note that all subject heading terms end with a period. Note the use of double dashes in the example below.

Here's an example of abstracts and real subject headings (a hefty example for a hefty collection):

<abstract label="Abstract" encodinganalog="520$a">The Penn School on Saint Helena Island, S.C.,
 was founded during the Civil War by northern philanthropists and missionaries for former 
plantation slaves in an area occupied by the United States Army. Over the years, with continuing
 philanthropic support, it served as school, health agency, and cooperative society for rural 
African Americans of the Sea Islands. The name was changed to Penn Community Services in 
1950.</abstract>
<abstract encodinganalog="520">The collection includes papers, chiefly 1900-1964, mainly office 
files from the Penn School, primarily the correspondence of the directors and of the trustees, 
treasurers, and publicity workers located elsewhere. Topics include African American education,
 Reconstruction, political and social change in South Carolina, agricultural extension work, 
public health issues, damage from hurricanes, World War I, the boll weevil and the cotton 
industry, the effects of the Great Depression on the school and the local population, changes in 
the school leading to a greater emphasis on social action in the outer world, and the end of the
 school and the turn to community service. Volumes include diaries, extracts from letters, 
recollections, minutes of the board of trustees, ledgers, cashbooks, inventories, financial 
records, registers of students and teachers, and minutes of various clubs and societies. Printed
 materials consists of newspapers clippings, pamphlets, promotional literature, school materials,
 administrative circulars, and annual reports. There are also about 3,000 photographs in the 
collection, dating from the 1860s to 1962 (bulk 1905-1944), documenting school activities, Island
 scenes and Islanders, classes and teachers, baptisms, agricultural activities, parades, fairs, 
and special events at the Penn School.</abstract>

<controlaccess>
<head>Subject Headings</head>
<list type="simple">
<item><subject source="lcsh" encodinganalog="650">African Americans--Education--South Carolina--
History.</subject></item>
<item><subject source="lcsh" encodinganalog="650">African Americans--South Carolina--History.
</subject></item>
<item><subject source="lcsh" encodinganalog="650">African Americans--Services for--South Carolina.
</subject></item>
<item><subject source="lcsh" encodinganalog="650">African Americans--South Carolina--Social life
and customs.</subject></item>
<item><subject source="lcsh" encodinganalog="650">African Americans--Societies, etc.</subject>
</item>
<item><subject source="lcsh" encodinganalog="650">Agricultural extension work--South Carolina.
</subject></item>
<item><subject source="lcsh" encodinganalog="650">Agriculture--South Carolina--Photographs.
</subject></item>
<item><subject source="lcsh" encodinganalog="650">Boll weevil--South Carolina--History.</subject>
</item>
<item><subject source="lcsh" encodinganalog="650">Cotton--South Carolina--History.</subject>
</item>
<item><subject source="lcsh" encodinganalog="650">Freedmen--South Carolina.</subject></item>
<item><subject source="lcsh" encodinganalog="650">Human services--South Carolina--History.
</subject></item>
<item><subject source="lcsh" encodinganalog="650">Hurricanes--South Carolina--History.</subject>
</item>
<item><corpname source="lcnaf" encodinganalog="610">Penn Community Services.</corpname></item>
<item><corpname source="lcnaf" encodinganalog="610">Penn School (Saint Helena Island, S.C.).
</corpname></item>
<item><subject source="lcsh" encodinganalog="650">Public health--South Carolina--History.
</subject></item>
<item><subject source="lcsh" encodinganalog="650">Reconstruction--South Carolina.</subject></item>
<item><geogname source="lcsh" encodinganalog="651">Saint Helena Island (S.C.)--History.</geogname>
</item>
<item><subject source="lcsh" encodinganalog="650">Schools--South Carolina--History.</subject>
</item>
<item><subject source="lcsh" encodinganalog="650">Schools--South Carolina--Photographs.</subject>
</item>
<item><subject source="lcsh" encodinganalog="650">Schools--South Carolina--Records and 
correspondence.</subject></item>
<item><geogname source="lcsh" encodinganalog="651">Sea Islands--Photographs.</geogname></item>
<item><geogname source="lcsh" encodinganalog="651">Sea Islands--Social life and customs.
</geogname></item>
<item><geogname source="lcsh" encodinganalog="651">Sea Islands--Social conditions.</geogname>
</item>
<item><geogname source="lcsh" encodinganalog="651">South Carolina--Economic conditions--20th 
century.</geogname></item>
<item><geogname source="lcsh" encodinganalog="651">South Carolina--History--1865- .</geogname>
</item>
</list>
</controlaccess>

Abstracts and Scope and Content Notes

Here's an example of the scope and content abstract and the collection overview for a small collection. Note that the same information appears in both, but that the wording in the scope and content note has been slightly modified to include the name of the family and its location.

<abstract encodinganalog="520">The collection consists of family correspondence, chiefly 1830s 
and 1840s. Included are letters, late 1830s, written by Richard Parish, his wife, and other 
relatives to Parish's daughters Lydia and Julia at school in Sparta, Ga., and correspondence of 
the Parishes with relatives in Tuscaloosa, Ala., and Wilmington, N.C. Most letters deal with 
family affairs; some relate to the girls' schooling, and there are brief references to Indians in 
Florida.</abstract>

<scopecontent>
<head>Scope and Content Note</head>
<p>Papers of the Parish family of Leon County, Fla., consist of family correspondence, chiefly 
1830s and 1840s. Included are letters, late 1830s, written by Richard Parish, his wife, and 
other relatives to Parish's daughters, Lydia Parish and Julia Parish, at school in Sparta, 
Ga., and correspondence of the Parishes with relatives in Tuscaloosa, Ala., and Wilmington, 
N.C. Most letters deal with family affairs; some relate to the girls' schooling, and there are 
brief references to Indians in Florida.</p>
</scopecontent>

DEFINITELY Save, Parse, View.

Last Steps

Proofread.

Spell check as appropriate (you may have too many names to make this an effective check, but give it a try).

Check for extra spaces, especially around tags. Remember that we never use two spaces in a row in web documents. Sometimes this can be hard to detect, especially around tags, as in:

<persname>William A. Carrigan </persname> is dead.

There's a space inside the </persname> tag and one outside the tag. This will show as a double space on the web. The space should ONLY be outside the tag.

Check punctuation, abbreviation, capitalization, format, etc., against the style guide (included in this manual).

Save, Parse, View.

Save to g: drive if you're done with your NoteTab session.

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